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WOIN N.O.W. Reputation Proposal

ruy343

Explorer
I felt that this was different enough to warrant its own thread related to N.O.W.

The attribute of "Reputation" isn't really explored very much in the "Action Careers" book, nor is it really touched upon in the "Modern Core" book. I'd like to propose some ideas before its published in hardcover, based on my experience with the GUMSHOE system and other sources. And to be frank, what I'm proposing might not be "new rules", per se, but it might help GMs and players understand how reputation might be used in the game. Please understand - this isn't a criticism, but rather an attempt to help make the rules even more awesome.

1. Since the game takes place in a modern setting, it wouldn't be too hard for people to write down the location where they did a "career" block, giving a player specific ties to that city or region of the world.

2. Reputation checks could be called upon to ask for favors from friends that a character might know from their previous careers in those locations.

  • For example: a player might have done a stint as a mercenary. After noting the changes to their character sheet listed in that section, the GM would ask them to note the place they did it as well. For this example, we'll say that he wrote "Saudi Arabia". Later on in the game, when uncovering clues in Sudan that indicate that they need to travel to England with haste, the player might tell the GM, "I used to work for a Sheikh in Saudi Arabia, and I protected his daughter from human traffickers. May I ask him to pick us up with his private jet?", and the GM sets an appropriate difficulty for the task (11, given it’s relatively nearby, isn’t a permanent piece of equipment, and only asking for something that shouldn’t be life-threatening for the friend). Additionally, the player might want to write down that detail for later, so that this NPC can be a consistent source of help and information.
  • Another example: After arriving in the UK after the previous example, the players need to stage an attack on the enemy compound, but they have no way to know the layout before they arrive – a dangerous situation indeed. However, the nerd in the group might know someone at Google Earth from their time as a geologist, and be able to call upon them to take a photo of the compound given GPS coordinates with a successful reputation roll. However, this one might be more difficult, because it puts that contact’s career on the line (16). Additionally, that contact may fail or be caught at the GM’s discretion, which could prompt other actions for the PCs.

3. I propose that a player could choose to either roll luck or reputation in addition to the normal roll for determining starting equipment. If you're well-connected, you should get some nice toys.

I think that including rules like this, or at least, explanations of reputation that give it additional power, that it would make the character concept of a well-connected individual both fun and rewarding to play. Also, it makes the idea of someone who's known among certain circles, but not to the public at large fit in with the mentality of the game (not everyone who's influential in the world is a celebrity). However, I'm not the game designer, and I humbly understand if these ideas don't fall in line with your idea for the game system.
 

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Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
That’s pretty much how REP works already. You can use REP to achieve tasks just like you can any other attribute. You might get into a club with a CHA or a REP check, for example.
 

ruy343

Explorer
Ah, then it sounds like I wasn't too far off then!

That said, some more explicit guidance in the book about this sort of thing would be helpful to first-time GMs. Writing the locations of previous careers might also give more adventure hooks to the GM, should he want to use them. It also means that a player could have a kind of "home turf advantage" should the adventure go to a country where they did multiple jobs in the past, which is something that could make a modern setting particularly poignant.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
When I run it, I ask players to write a sentence or two about each career as they take it. That forms their backstory. Different GMs might have different styles though.
 

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