• Resources are back! Use the menu in the main navbar. If you own a resource, please check it for formatting, icons, etc.

5E New Eberron Book Details From WotC

WotC’s Jeremy Crawford appeared on Twitch last night with Bart Carroll, discussing the upcoming D&D setting book Eberron: Rising from the Last War. Lots of details within!

ED746060-9834-4FFF-A8DB-F1B39F19E486.jpeg


- Overview of Eberron, emphasized potentials for adventure and post-WWI pulp style of setting.

- Dragonmarked Houses as fantasy Corporations, playable Dragonmarked characters as race rules in the book

- Rules and stories for playing, Warforged, Changlings, Kalsthar, Shifters, Goblins, Hobgoblins, Bugbears, Orcs. Playable Orc is different fro mthe Volo's Guide rules to reflect the different story (no intelligence malus, few other tweaks, still usable for other worlds, these are PC Orcs as opposed to Monster Manual Orcs like Volo's).

- Full rules for the Artificer, including a new feature in this book for making Common and Uncommon magic items

- Aberrant Dragonmark Feats are in the book

- Group patron rules for organizations the late 19th-early 20th century style: newspapers, criminal syndicates, universities, spy rings: fourth choice after Race-Class-Background that the party makes together, has new fluff background features to give characters and adventure hooks

- Possibility of the party becoming their own patron, example being creating your own Crime Syndicate

- All of the above is Chapter 1 material

- Chapter 2 is a Gazeeter of Korvaire and the world: delves into great nations, the religions, touches on otehr continents

- Chapter 3 is a zoom in on Sharn, a microcosm of the setting, great place for Noir intrigue

- Chapter 4 is a 100 page adventure creation toolkit comparable to Guildmaster's Guide to Ravnica: wealth of adventure building tables, maps, organization information, first level adventure set in Sharn. Reveals brand new information about the Mournland, for instance, during the war they created not just regular Warforged and Warforged Titans but also Warforged Colossi the size of skyscrapers: one of the maps is of a fallen Warfored Colossi as a dungeon @doctorbadwolf

- Section in "massive" chapter for creating adventures about Eberron's cosmology, and how it relates to Great Wheel multiverse, left to DM to decide how sealed off Eberron is by the Progenitor Dragons

- There are extended magical item economy rules in chapter 5, Common magical items are plentiful: buying, selling, crafting rules and price lists.

- Eberron specific monsters and NPCs in the sixth and final chapter, covering things like Daelkyr, Living Spells (3 different Living Spells in the book including Living Cloud Kill, and a template for making more) and various specific NPCs

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Comments

Parmandur

Legend
That sounds awesome! 8D

But I am confused how this book compares to the other Eberron release from last year.
That was a playtest with some new rules, and a fair amount of fluff totalling ~50,000 words. This takes the finalized rules elements, and adds a ton more, coming in at ~200,000 words. New monsters, new maps, etc.
 
I haven't really sent it discussed much, but I feel like monster design has improved tremendously since the MM. Both MToF and GGtR had some really good, deep monsters with interesting abilities.
I think a lot of it is that the MM is built with new/casual gamers/DM's as one of (if not the) primary audience, and thus monsters are pretty straightforward. Later books are geared more for more dedicated gamers/DM's, and the monsters are more interesting. AP's tend to split the difference with a couple of interesting monsters and a lot of MM monsters.
 

SkidAce

Adventurer
I think a lot of it is that the MM is built with new/casual gamers/DM's as one of (if not the) primary audience, and thus monsters are pretty straightforward. Later books are geared more for more dedicated gamers/DM's, and the monsters are more interesting. AP's tend to split the difference with a couple of interesting monsters and a lot of MM monsters.
This makes sense, I wonder if it was planned or grew organically?
 

R_J_K75

Explorer
That was a playtest with some new rules, and a fair amount of fluff totalling ~50,000 words. This takes the finalized rules elements, and adds a ton more, coming in at ~200,000 words. New monsters, new maps, etc.
So if one disregards the mechanical rules would it be a safe assumption to say it would be worth buying the Wayfarers Guide for the fluff not in the upcoming book, if youre going to run an Eberron campaign?
 

Parmandur

Legend
So if one disregards the mechanical rules would it be a safe assumption to say it would be worth buying the Wayfarers Guide for the fluff not in the upcoming book, if youre going to run an Eberron campaign?
Unknown, honestly: it has been confirmed that it is not all in the new book, but details are light at this point.
 

R_J_K75

Explorer
Unknown, honestly: it has been confirmed that it is not all in the new book, but details are light at this point.
Kind of figured that was the answer, suppose theres no way to know until it comes out. Makes me wish I didnt get rid of my 3E copies of the campaign setting.
 

JohnLynch

Explorer
Damn. I have pretty low expectations for 5e products, but this might just entice me to let my players decide if they prefer PF2e or 5e.
 

R_J_K75

Explorer
Damn. I have pretty low expectations for 5e products, but this might just entice me to let my players decide if they prefer PF2e or 5e.
Havent read or played PF2e but I bet it wouldnt be too hard to adapt Eberron to it if you dont want to run 5E. Id think you could always take a little from both systems.
 

DEFCON 1

Legend
If you want the fluff of Eberron you shouldn't buy either Wayfinders Guide or Rising for it, you should buy the original Eberron Campaign Setting book from 3.5. You'll get more comprehensive information about the entirety of Khorvaire than anything you're going to get in the two 5E books. And then after that, pick up the other 3.5 expansion books like Five Nations, Dragonmarked, and Faiths of Eberron to get even more useful information.
 

R_J_K75

Explorer
If you want the fluff of Eberron you shouldn't buy either Wayfinders Guide or Rising for it, you should buy the original Eberron Campaign Setting book from 3.5. You'll get more comprehensive information about the entirety of Khorvaire than anything you're going to get in the two 5E books. And then after that, pick up the other 3.5 expansion books like Five Nations, Dragonmarked, and Faiths of Eberron to get even more useful information.
That was the impression I got too from reading these posts here. I had most of the 3.5 material at one time but sold alot of my collection a couple of times over the years out of necessity. I did like the original campaign setting and ran a few short campaigns which were fun. Im leery these days to invest in more than a campaign setting book such as the supplemental campaign setting books because it seems the older I get the harder it is to keep a gaming group together when everyday life interferes.
 
If you want the fluff of Eberron you shouldn't buy either Wayfinders Guide or Rising for it, you should buy the original Eberron Campaign Setting book from 3.5. You'll get more comprehensive information about the entirety of Khorvaire than anything you're going to get in the two 5E books. And then after that, pick up the other 3.5 expansion books like Five Nations, Dragonmarked, and Faiths of Eberron to get even more useful information.
Literally the only 3.5 book I still own is the ECS. It's a great book with lots of depth. I use it to supplement the Wayfarers guide in my current casual weekly game.
 

DM Howard

Explorer
I don't think I'll be doing Eberron for a while, it's one of those settings that I like so much I don't think I could do it justice.

I'll be buying this day one at my LGS to show WotC that there is a market for setting books.
 
Putting detailed magic item economy rules in a setting guide is a great idea. It gives those who have been asking for such rules a place to get them while alleviating my concerns that publication of such rules would make them become players' default assumptions for the game. As long as they stay in setting books, they become just another option alongside the DMG version and Xanathar's version.
 

Advertisement

Latest threads

Advertisement

Top