D&D General Player Responsibilities

Reynard

Legend
I tried the search function because I thought we have discussed this before, but alas.

What responsibilities do you think players have in the game? As players, in regards to the social contract, even economically if we are talking about things groups have to buy?

One thing that came up in another thread that I was actually surprised at my own vehemence of was this: players need to.show the GM the respect of actually paying attention and engaging the game enough to remember important events and people and things. Not every detail of all the lore, just things that actually happen in play. Take notes.

What do.you think the player responsibilities are?
 

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James Gasik

Legend
Supporter
The players and the referee have a responsibility to make the game fun for everyone. All stop. Anything that makes the game more fun is worthy, and anything that isn't....isn't.

If that means take notes so the DM doesn't have to keep recapping every session, or make sure there's an extra PHB around, or that you know the rules regarding your character abilities, so be it.

But that's not always necessary at every table.

Being the referee is a tough job, and often it feels like the players aren't giving you your due. And sometimes, the players feel like the ref is trying too hard to challenge them, and turning the game into an unfun slog.

In my experience, what should happen here, in the interests of shared enjoyment, is that the group should talk this out like adults. If they can't, well, not all people are meant to play together. Everyone is free to back out and create a new group, after all.
 

DND_Reborn

The High Aldwin
1. Be respectful to the DM and other players.
2. Be prompt or contact if you'll be late.
3. Provide your share of the refreshments. -- No moochers, please. ;)
4. Know your character and the PC's features, spells, etc..
5. Put your phone on vibrate (I prefer more low-tech games).
6. Express your views/concerns freely, but understand two things: a) game time is not the time for lengthy discussions and b) the DM has final say.
7. Pay attention when it isn't your turn. As DM, I do NOT want to recap what is going on when you are present!
8. Contribute to the conversation/discussion/etc. Please don't be completely passive.
9. HAVE FUN!

EDIT: FWIW, I recommend at least one player be a note-taker as I really don't want to repeat information constantly, but if something was overlooked, etc. I have no issue reminding players occasionally.
 



overgeeked

B/X Known World
In meatspace games, share the cost of refreshments and food when you can. Bring enough for yourself and some to share, if you can. If you can’t, take what you need. The rest of us over buy for a reason. Try to show up a few minutes early in case the host needs help setting up. Stay a few minutes after the game in case the host needs help tearing down. Keep cross talk to a minimum at the table. If you need to discuss things, step away from the table. Don’t talk over other players.

In online games, minimizes ambient noise as much as possible and turn off any music. Jump on the game 5-10 minutes early to catch any technical problems. Mute your mic when it’s not your turn. Don’t talk over other players. Use text or chat for table talk during combat.

In all games, pay attention as much as you can. If you know you need accommodations, speak up. If you can’t speak up at the table, speak up between games. We’re all here to play with you. If we need to tweak things to keep you at the table, let us know. If your memory is bad, take notes. If the story is complex, take notes. If you have trouble with names, take notes. Basically, take notes. Know the basics of the game well enough to not slow things down. Know the mechanics of your class well enough to not slow things down too much. Everyone’s gotta learn sometime...just try to make it happen between sessions, not during your turn. Have a default action. If you don’t know what to do in the first 20-30 seconds of your turn, use the default action.

Kindness, respect, Wheaton’s Law, etc.
 

tetrasodium

Legend
Supporter
Learn the rules. Prepare for the game. D&D is a cooperative team game so be ready to cooperate & Don't hog the spotlight. Learn how their character's abilities work & double check when odd edge cases come up. Plan before your turn so the whole group isn't stuck watching to suddenly try to decide what you are doing for the first time now that their turn is up. Communicate with the other players at the table about the game. Pay attention to the GM & other players even when it's not your turn. K eep notes.
 

bloodtide

Adventurer
1. Be respectful to the DM and other players.
2. Be prompt or contact if you'll be late.
3. Provide your share of the refreshments. -- No moochers, please. ;)
4. Know your character and the PC's features, spells, etc..
5. Put your phone on vibrate (I prefer more low-tech games).
6. Express your views/concerns freely, but understand two things: a) game time is not the time for lengthy discussions and b) the DM has final say.
7. Pay attention when it isn't your turn. As DM, I do NOT want to recap what is going on when you are present!
8. Contribute to the conversation/discussion/etc. Please don't be completely passive.
9. HAVE FUN!
This is a good list.

Though in most cases as GM I still need to put down the iron fist.

-For Two: show up on time, or don't bother coming. Any excuse less then "my house exploded" will not be accepted. If you have a "crazy busy" life, then you should have NEVER even said you were coming to the game.
 

DND_Reborn

The High Aldwin
This is a good list.
Thanks. It has been my list for decades LOL!

Though in most cases as GM I still need to put down the iron fist.
Sometimes it comes to that, yes. ;)

-For Two: show up on time, or don't bother coming. Any excuse less then "my house exploded" will not be accepted. If you have a "crazy busy" life, then you should have NEVER even said you were coming to the game.
Stuff happens, so I don't mind if it happens on occasion, but if it becomes an issue, either make a change or drop out until you commit again.
 


Our game is probably less serious than most, and we tend to digress from the game more than others. This is because there's currently only three of us playing, but I generally agree with most of what was already said. Bring your own beer/pop/ snacks and throw in for food whether we order out or grill/cook. This has never been a problem even on the rare occasion a player isn't financially able to contribute everyone else will carry them if need be.

One thing I will add is supplies. I think all players and the DM should share the cost for things such as printer ink, paper, pens, pencils, wet/dry erase markers, mostly the consumable stuff that runs out. As I've primarily been the DM over the years the very few times I've actually asked players to put money in for these things they were always willing to.
 

cbwjm

Legend
I totally blanked on a game just yesterday, also missed my friends text asking if I was joining until an hour or more later.

I like it when players take some notes, and I like to try and take some for at least our quests. However, I also like it when I run or play a game session when we have that initial convo about what has happened. It's all part of the friends catch-up when we play.

About the only thing I sort of require of players though is that they know what their class features do, because I will often ask what it does so someone needs to know. Dndbeyond helps immensely with this since all the info is right there.
 

Prepare for the game.
I don't prep that much these days, I do more of a general outline and let the game progress organically, but I'm always ready to improvise. As a player though I do get aggravated if the DM shows up unprepared and doesnt have the chops to improv. Usually when this happens it shows, the game suffers and just isn't fun. In those cases, I think to myself that was a waste of time, I could have done something else and consider whether I want to keep playing in this person's game.

-For Two: show up on time, or don't bother coming. Any excuse less then "my house exploded" will not be accepted. If you have a "crazy busy" life, then you should have NEVER even said you were coming to the game.
This is a little harsh especially if playing amongst friends, but I do agree if it becomes the norm with a player then yes they should drop out or I will ask them not to play until they can commit. I don't mind if a player is late or has to cancel on occasion as long as they give us notice, if possible, but hey sometimes houses explode unexpectedly.
 

tetrasodium

Legend
Supporter
I don't prep that much these days, I do more of a general outline and let the game progress organically, but I'm always ready to improvise. As a player though I do get aggravated if the DM shows up unprepared and doesnt have the chops to improv. Usually when this happens it shows, the game suffers and just isn't fun. In those cases, I think to myself that was a waste of time, I could have done something else and consider whether I want to keep playing in this person's game.


This is a little harsh especially if playing amongst friends, but I do agree if it becomes the norm with a player then yes they should drop out or I will ask them not to play until they can commit. I don't mind if a player is late or has to cancel on occasion as long as they give us notice, if possible, but hey sometimes houses explode unexpectedly.
I was talking about players needing to prepare for the game. Don't show up & start leveling your character after a week long break. Dopn't show up & ask me to rule on a questionable interaction you noticed days ago while leveling up/reviewing your abilities/etc & weren't sure about but would like a ruling on right now before we start when you could have asked in chat at any point. Don't show up & declare that you couldn't print your character sheet because your printer was .dead this week to five people who could have printed it for you had you asked before we were starting the game. So on & so forth
 

There’s only two things I really care about as a GM when it comes to player responsibilities,
1. Know what to roll and what to add to the rolls
2. Put in effort to participate in the game instead of passively waiting for me to ask you if you do something.

I play with friends, so the respect stuff and refreshments stuff goes without saying. But sometimes I just want to hit the end session button after being asked EVERY TURN, what the player needs to roll and what to add. We implemented proficiency dice at the start of the new campaign and all but one of five players remember to add a D4 to their rolls. I thought maybe the proficiency dice thing was too complicated, and that we should just go back to the static +2, but they’d just forget to add the bonus.
 

John Lloyd1

Explorer
Knowing the rule & character abilities is an interesting one. As a DM I want the players to know their characters so I don't need to even have to know those rules. But, being accessible for new players means accepting players don't know them.

I play in a game store which manages the tables. When I'm DMing, I might get a need to take people extra people if needed. This changes the way you manage expectations.
 





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