D&D General RP style Problem solver?


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Yora

Legend
I'll admit, this is a bit of a head-scratcher for me because I think of adventurers as, well, travelling problem-solvers. But perhaps this player is more motivated by discovery and exploration. Those are, after all, also part of adventure.
The problem of "What actually is an adventurer?" had been hounding me for probably 10 years. The typical image of an adventurer makes sense as a videogame character or a third-rate anime protagonist, but it very quickly starts falling apart if you try imagining a plausible work inhabited by plausible people that doesn't run on game mechanic logic. It can work perfectly as a game, but doesn't hold up as plausible fiction. Ultimately I gave up on the idea altogether. The Hero for Hire who goes from town to town asking if there's any monsters that need slaying or kittens to rescue doesn't work for me.

  • Guardsmen who have a permanent job to be on standby to deal with dangers to the community work.
  • Mercenaries who take high risk jobs for high pay from powerful people works. They do it for the money, and the people hiring don't try to ask for charity.
  • Treasure hunters who go into dangerous places to loot riches work. If they happen to kill some beasts that have been bothering locals recently, that's a positive side effect, but not why they are doing it.
  • Wasteland Wanderers who are searching for resources to stay alive and better protect themselves work.
 


I will say 6 sessions with no issues is weird though. That game for us would most likely have had a few arguments for us to defuse and maybe some mystery to solve like “why DID that adventurer retire?” Or even “is that farmers daughter sleeping with the help?”

Last campaign we played in under her had us go months with out a real fight. All of our encounters were social or intrigue.
that does sound cool... but even that is 'problem solving' and 'discovery' as I see it
 

UngainlyTitan

Legend
Supporter
The problem of "What actually is an adventurer?" had been hounding me for probably 10 years. The typical image of an adventurer makes sense as a videogame character or a third-rate anime protagonist, but it very quickly starts falling apart if you try imagining a plausible work inhabited by plausible people that doesn't run on game mechanic logic. It can work perfectly as a game, but doesn't hold up as plausible fiction. Ultimately I gave up on the idea altogether. The Hero for Hire who goes from town to town asking if there's any monsters that need slaying or kittens to rescue doesn't work for me.
The adventurer is an escapist construct. It is a vehicle for escapism. I do not there think there is anything wrong with escapism but it is not about any real world concerns.

  • Guardsmen who have a permanent job to be on standby to deal with dangers to the community work.
  • Mercenaries who take high risk jobs for high pay from powerful people works. They do it for the money, and the people hiring don't try to ask for charity.
  • Treasure hunters who go into dangerous places to loot riches work. If they happen to kill some beasts that have been bothering locals recently, that's a positive side effect, but not why they are doing it.
  • Wasteland Wanderers who are searching for resources to stay alive and better protect themselves work.
And realistically any of the above will retire to something safer is they make a big payoff.
 


UngainlyTitan

Legend
Supporter
There are people in the real world (usually bored rich people) who do dangerous things just for the adrenalin rush.
But usually dangerous thing where they have a high degree of control of the level of danger.

Penetrating dangerous trap filled tombs populated by unspeakable horrors and foul soul destroying magic is pretty much certain death. At least at the typical unit size of the average adventuring party. As a world building exercise it makes little sense.
 

But usually dangerous thing where they have a high degree of control of the level of danger.
I wouldn't say so. I mean look at Steve Irwin. Go back a hundred years and you have Robert Falcon Scott. A hundred years before that and you have a whole bunch of professional adventures. Some were in it for the money (Robert Clive), some are in it for God (David Livingstone), some for glory (Howard Carter) and some are in it because that's the job (Henry Stanley). All going into dangerous situations where death was a more than likely outcome.

The idea that people won't get off their backsides if there isn't money in it, and even then won't take risks is very 21st century.
 

he also told us about (and no offensive to him, he is awesome this sounded boring) a campaign where they spend 6 sessions (it was monthly so 6 months out of game time) in a farming area where the family farm had a dozen workers and the DM had names personalities, even pictures for 20ish NPCs ranging from the 6year old to the old man who used to be an adventurer and now just wanted to pick vegies. they talked to them and no one attacked and no one had anything to hide and no one had a quest... but they got to RP interacting with them and getting to find out about each other (the characters the players had) by role playing dinner with different groups of them and games.
another player told him that sounded more like a session of down time to us, a few hours of rp, not multi sessions... and he agreed that was what he found weird we would spend months fighting or problem solving then 'skip' the real RP part of the role playing game calling it down time...
Sounds like he imprinted on a frankly pretty bizarre way to run a game. Nothing you can really do about that. Either he realizes there's value in different kinds of GMs and campaigns—and also just how unlikely he is to find that oddball approach again—or he's basically out of the hobby. Not sure even Yazeba's Bed and Breakfast would scratch the itch he's developed.

I do think there are some GMs who skip potentially interesting RP scenes/opportunities. But identifying when to fast forward, when to hard frame, how to balance straight RP and RP-with-rolls, that's all more of an art than a science, and varies across every game and table. And more importantly, it doesn't sound like you were rushing or depriving the players of fun RP. This one player just wants nothing but slice-of-life RP. Best of luck to him finding much of that.
 

UngainlyTitan

Legend
Supporter
I wouldn't say so. I mean look at Steve Irwin. Go back a hundred years and you have Robert Falcon Scott. A hundred years before that and you have a whole bunch of professional adventures. Some were in it for the money (Robert Clive), some are in it for God (David Livingstone), some for glory (Howard Carter) and some are in it because that's the job (Henry Stanley). All going into dangerous situations where death was a more than likely outcome.

The idea that people won't get off their backsides if there isn't money in it, and even then won't take risks is very 21st century.
Well Irwin and Scott both went back to the river one time too many and died in action, so to speak. Clive was the guy hiring adventurers not the adventurer per se. Livingstone and Stanley I will grant you but how many others at the time, doing similar things died in unmarked graves.

Carter is another of the well funded expedition in a relatively safe area.
 

Well Irwin and Scott both went back to the river one time too many and died in action, so to speak.
As adventurers do. Danger is an addiction.
Clive was the guy hiring adventurers not the adventurer per se.
He started out doing it himself, then sent out others once he had accumulated enough (usually by killing people and stealing their stuff).
Livingstone and Stanley I will grant you but how many others at the time, doing similar things died in unmarked graves.
Lots, especially the women.
Carter is another of the well funded expedition in a relatively safe area.
An awful lot of fatalities for a "relatively safe area"!
 
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payn

Legend
he also told us about (and no offensive to him, he is awesome this sounded boring) a campaign where they spend 6 sessions (it was monthly so 6 months out of game time) in a farming area where the family farm had a dozen workers and the DM had names personalities, even pictures for 20ish NPCs ranging from the 6year old to the old man who used to be an adventurer and now just wanted to pick vegies. they talked to them and no one attacked and no one had anything to hide and no one had a quest... but they got to RP interacting with them and getting to find out about each other (the characters the players had) by role playing dinner with different groups of them and games.
another player told him that sounded more like a session of down time to us, a few hours of rp, not multi sessions... and he agreed that was what he found weird we would spend months fighting or problem solving then 'skip' the real RP part of the role playing game calling it down time...
I got this thing called Saturday nights at the tavern so I dont need to role play this in a game. To each their own.
 

DEFCON 1

Legend
Supporter
I'm sure there's a happy medium found between six sessions of just talking with a farming community and a dozen plot hooks handed out one after the other every time you arrive in town.

Heck, a standard trope that splits the difference is a village where the party interacts with the townsfolk on all kinds of simple, menial things, and then there is a job board the group can view and then "go get" a plot hook that sounds interesting to them. You don't plop a whole bunch of hooks at their feet, but you make them easy to find a few when the group is ready to get up and about.
 


UngainlyTitan

Legend
Supporter
As all adventurers do. Danger is an addiction.

He started out doing it himself, then sent out others once he had accumulated enough (usually by killing people and stealing their stuff).
Two things here, before 1900 or so journeying anywhere was inherently dangerous. Even staying at home was dangerous. There were diseases you could catch and playing around with horses could kill you. Journeying to India was dangerous in and of its self in that one might not make it there or back but Clive was operating for and behalf of the East India Company. His biggest risks were disease and the voyages too and from. The odd battle now and again but he was a gentleman and disease was much more a risk than battle anywhere.

Still not as insane as the kind of stuff D&D characters get up to.

Re Carter
An awful lot of fatalities for a "relatively safe area"!
While I have never looked closely at the Carter expedition, how much worse was it compared the fatalities in the average construction project at the time.
Health and Safety in the nineteenth and early twentieth century was pretty much non existent.

I do agree that there are adrenaline junkies out there but I am not convinced that they will high and unknown levels of risk.
 


iserith

Magic Wordsmith
A friend pointed out to me that there are definitely Discord servers this player could join that really specialize in the sort of play they are describing. It might be worth recommending that to them. I've seen this on other servers I've been on where you'd know when the DM posts the game it's really more about this sort of thing than bold adventurers confronting deadly perils for gold and glory. This would tend to be sequestered in certain "Heavy RP" or "Deep Lore" channels from what I saw. Some people were definitely into it.
 


I'm sure there's a happy medium found between six sessions of just talking with a farming community and a dozen plot hooks handed out one after the other every time you arrive in town.

Heck, a standard trope that splits the difference is a village where the party interacts with the townsfolk on all kinds of simple, menial things, and then there is a job board the group can view and then "go get" a plot hook that sounds interesting to them. You don't plop a whole bunch of hooks at their feet, but you make them easy to find a few when the group is ready to get up and about.
I mean it sounds like I plopped them all down when I sumerize... but it was a town with almost 30 labeled places of interest, they only found out plots as they went...

its not like they walk in and just get told " here are the troubles" if they had not talked to the 'kid' who they saw looking moppy and kicking rocks by teh dried up well they would not have found out he was trying to get married...
 

payn

Legend
I mean it sounds like I plopped them all down when I sumerize... but it was a town with almost 30 labeled places of interest, they only found out plots as they went...

its not like they walk in and just get told " here are the troubles" if they had not talked to the 'kid' who they saw looking moppy and kicking rocks by teh dried up well they would not have found out he was trying to get married...
Yeah I dont think you are doing anything wrong. The more I hear this it sounds like disparate playstyle and its likely best to split.

Are you still concerned about adding folks to your group?
 

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