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So what are you reading this year 2021?

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Then “Perdido Street Station” will follow. My wife got it for me for Christmas. My reading of China Mieville is limited to some of his comic work and I’ve meant to get to this book for some time, but for some reason my local B&N never had a copy.
Will be interested in hearing your opinion of Perdido.
 

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Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Late coming to the party, but I've finally started reading Malazan Book of the Fallen series. I'm just a bit into Gardens of the Moon.

My immediate TBR pile includes The Riddlemaster of Hed by Patricia A. McKillip, Syd Field's Screenplay: The Foundations of Screenwriting, and The City We Became by N.K. Jemisin. Oh, and I started and put aside The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. with holiday hectic-ness that I should pick back up - but it wasn't quite engaging me.

I see several mentions of Bridge of Birds. Really enjoyed it, and I saw a used copy of all three books in one cheap so I picked it up even though I own the first. Anyone have any experience with the other books in the series? It doesn't seem set up for a sequel.
 

Nellisir

Adventurer
Finished Agatha H and the Voice of the Castle, by Phil and Kaja Foglio. I'm going to go ahead and say 5/5, because it's a really good/fun read and compelling enough that I'm going to search out the one I (think) I have and get whatever I'm missing. PROBABLY the most Pratchett-like voice I've read aside from Pratchett himself (not the social satire side, just the humor and asides). It's a hefty book (good paper) and 484 pages, so it took me quite a bit longer than expected. On the down side, I have no idea who some of the characters were towards the end. They all just blurred.

My gf gets bookstore credit from her mother every year. Like, a really large amount. And she finally realized that she doesn't have to buy certain books anymore (unlike her previous job, which required a lot of reading according to certain criteria), and can buy ANYTHING. So she's also getting ME books. (I'm starting to get freaked out by how many books I've gotten in the past few months. Even for me it's insane. I've lost track. All half-price/gifts/used.)

Anyways, I'm closing in on the complete collection of Andrew Lang fairy books; got Noir by Christopher Moore, and the three most recent Arkady Renko books by Martin Cruz Smith: Three Stations; Tatiana; The Siberian Dilemma.
 

Nellisir

Adventurer
I see several mentions of Bridge of Birds. Really enjoyed it, and I saw a used copy of all three books in one cheap so I picked it up even though I own the first. Anyone have any experience with the other books in the series? It doesn't seem set up for a sequel.
I wrote a reply, but it didn't post or something?
Anyways, I love the Riddlemaster of Hed and NK Jemisin.

The sequels to Bridge of Birds are, basically, forgettable. It was lightning in a bottle, I guess. Barry Hughart apparently had an appalling time with his publishers (and hated that he was lumped in the fantasy genre), and quit writing after those three just so he wouldn't have to deal with them. He recently died, alas.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Finished Agatha H and the Voice of the Castle, by Phil and Kaja Foglio. I'm going to go ahead and say 5/5, because it's a really good/fun read and compelling enough that I'm going to search out the one I (think) I have and get whatever I'm missing. PROBABLY the most Pratchett-like voice I've read aside from Pratchett himself (not the social satire side, just the humor and asides). It's a hefty book (good paper) and 484 pages, so it took me quite a bit longer than expected. On the down side, I have no idea who some of the characters were towards the end. They all just blurred.

My gf gets bookstore credit from her mother every year. Like, a really large amount. And she finally realized that she doesn't have to buy certain books anymore (unlike her previous job, which required a lot of reading according to certain criteria), and can buy ANYTHING. So she's also getting ME books. (I'm starting to get freaked out by how many books I've gotten in the past few months. Even for me it's insane. I've lost track. All half-price/gifts/used.)

Anyways, I'm closing in on the complete collection of Andrew Lang fairy books; got Noir by Christopher Moore, and the three most recent Arkady Renko books by Martin Cruz Smith: Three Stations; Tatiana; The Siberian Dilemma.

Ok, just ducked (alternate search engine duckduckgo) "Andrew Lang Fairy" and 🤯
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Still reading Exploring Eberron by Keith Baker.

Still reading Searching for Bobby Fischer.

Still reading White Night by Jim Butcher.

Still reading The Companions by R. A. Salvatore.

Still reading Rhythm of War by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance.

Finished reading Killing Crazy Horse: The Merciless Indian Wars in America by Bill O'Reilly & Martin Dugard.

Started reading The Battle of Salamis by Barry Strauss.
 

I finished Leiber's The Swords of Lankhmar. I was honestly surprised at how much I enjoyed it. My general feeling is that the latter you go in the series and the longer the story, the worse in quality. Yet Swords never dragged, kept that snappy dialog and action that the best Fafhrd and Grey Mouser tales have.

Next up is Hannes Bok's The Sorcerer's Ship.
 



I finished Bok's The Sorcerer's Ship. Quite enjoyable, with an unexpected ending that made me love it even more. And even though it's not in Appendix N, it feels like it should be. There's illusion and healing magic, even sort-of clay golems. The illusion magic especially feels like an influence on D&D. It's specifically called out that an illusion of flame generated no heat.

Next up, Anthony A. Barrett's Rome Is Burning: Nero and the Fire That Ended a Dynasty.
 

Nellisir

Adventurer
I finished Bok's The Sorcerer's Ship. Quite enjoyable, with an unexpected ending that made me love it even more. And even though it's not in Appendix N, it feels like it should be. There's illusion and healing magic, even sort-of clay golems. The illusion magic especially feels like an influence on D&D. It's specifically called out that an illusion of flame generated no heat.

Next up, Anthony A. Barrett's Rome Is Burning: Nero and the Fire That Ended a Dynasty.
I haven't found my copy yet. Sad face. But that's a great review to hear!
 

dragoner

Dying in Chargen
Just finishing The Fall of the Towers by Samuel Delany, thinking about Oath of Fealty by Niven, supposedly the origin of the "Feudal Technocracy" thrown around so much in sci-fi of that era, including Traveller's Third Imperium setting. Not super excited about that book though. I did get an Amazon card, so thinking about getting Bone Silence by Alastair Reynolds, the final one of his Revenger trilogy, or Agent of the Imperium, by Marc Miller, of Traveller fame.
 

I finished up Venus of Dreams and I can't really say I enjoyed it much. The main character, Iris, was somebody you could really root for when she was young, but as she aged throughout the book she became self-absorbed, selfish, and even something of a Mary Sue, in that of the thousands and thousands of people working on terraforming Venus she was always right there wherever anything important was going to happen and everyone around her automatically adopted her suggestions - even her enemies. And I would have preferred a bit more action over the 536 pages; a great deal of this was devoted to character development, which would have been fine if it was a character I actually still liked after the first hundred pages or so.

But I'm now moving on to Bad Ronald by Jack Vance, one of my all-time favorite authors. While he's primarily known for his fantasy and science fiction, this is a modern novel (well, it was written in 1973) about a teenager implicated in a murder, whose mother then seals him up in a hidden section of the house they live in and tells everyone he ran away. The plan is for them to move away to somewhere where nobody knows them once she's saved up enough money - but then she dies from an illness and a new family buys the house, not knowing about Ronald still hidden away there in his secret room....

Johnathan
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I keep hoovering up the Murderbot books, just finished vol 4 and have vol 5 in hand. Vol 5 seems to be more novel length than novella. I've been really liking the novella length, and may start looking at picking up more of them.

I'm also reading on a book called Polaris Rising. I'm not sure where I got the impulse to read that book - but it all of a sudden showed up at the library in my name. It's ok, although has a lot of romance tropes.
 

Lidgar

Adventurer
The books I got for Christmas...
Piers Anthony Macroscope
EL Doctorow Ragtime
Barry Hughart Bridge of Birds

Just finished Murderbot Diaries vol 1 All Systems Red and super enjoyed it.
I remember really liking Macroscope. It definitely has a trippy vibe, but like the basic premise which involves how we can conduct intergalactic exploration without worm holes or faster then light travel.

Currently finishing up Lockwood & Co. Will be finishing The Broken Earth trilogy after that.
 

Well, I read through Bad Ronald in one day and it was a very good read - suitably creepy and yes, he was definitely a bad, bad Ronald. Now I'm starting The Blue Nowhere by Jeffery Deaver, a novel about a convicted hacker being freed from his prison sentence to help the police track down a killer who uses hacking techniques to find out everything he can about his future victims, to lure them into a false sense of security so he can get close enough to kill them. It was written in 2002, so the book starting off with a glossary that describes what are today well-known computer terms was kind of funny, but so far the novel itself is looking good.

Johnathan
 


ModernApathy

Explorer
I picked up The Light of the Jedi when it was released at the start of the year. Having never read a Star Wars book before I figured this would be a good time/place to jump in. Just over half way through and I'm enjoying it.

One thing I've always loved about Star Wars is the visual design, so I find myself having to go online and google pics to see what some of the ships and characters look like.
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
I HAD been reading Tigana up until today. But it’s such a slog I just couldn’t continue any longer. So I completely switched gears and started I, Strahd, which I’ve never read before.
 

I finished Rome is Burning. While it's meticulously researched, it gets lost too frequently in the weeds of digressions and citations. Bummer, because Nero and the fire of Rome in 64 AD should've been a fascinating subject.

Next up is Joe Haldeman's The Forever War.
 

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