Stargate RPG Announced from Wyvern Gaming

MGM and Wyvern Gaming (best known for the board game Sojourn: A Journey Through Time) announced a new roleplaying game based on the Stargate television series franchise with a preview at Gen Con this year with a full release coming at Gen Con 2020.
From the press release:

MGM AND WYVERN GAMING TO LAUNCH STARGATE ROLEPLAYING GAME INSPIRED BY HIT TELEVISION SERIES

Fans to Get Sneak Peek at Gen Con in August, with Release to Follow at Gen Con 2020

June 11, 2019 — “Permission to barge in, sir?” Now all Stargate aficionados have “permission to barge in” and take on the bad guys with the Stargate Roleplaying Game. MGM, a leading entertainment company focused on the production and global distribution of film and television content including major franchises such as Rocky, James Bond, Fargo, Vikings, The Handmaid’s Tale and Pink Panther, and game design company Wyvern Gaming, are collaborating on a new roleplaying game based on the popular Stargate SG-1™ TV series. Fans will be able to get a sneak peek at the game at Gen Con this August, with the launch expected to follow in 2020. MGM’s licensing agency, Brandgenuity, is managing the development and roll out of the Stargate licensing program and brokered the agreement between Wyvern Gaming and MGM.

Brad Ellis, CEO at Wyvern Gaming, said, “We love the Stargate franchise, and we wanted to create a roleplaying game in which fans can become a member of the SGC. Just imagining progressing a character from level 1 to 20 while exploring the universe is a thrilling thought. We’re building on top of the D&D 5th edition Open Gaming License to make this an approachable game for roleplayers while adding the exploration and mechanics necessary for a modern science fiction setting.”

Robert Marick, Executive Vice President Global Consumer Products and Experiences at MGM, said, “There’s a passionate fanbase for Stargate SG-1 who are eager to immerse themselves in experiences that extend the brand well beyond the TV screen. Collaborating with Wyvern Gaming on the Stargate Roleplaying Game enables us to give those who continue to watch and re-watch episodes of the hit TV show the opportunity to enjoy the series and its memorable characters in a whole new way.”

The new Stargate Roleplaying Game lets players explore the galaxy and aid in the fight against the Goa’uld System Lords. The core rulebook contains all the information needed to create a character and join the Stargate Command (SGC). Players will choose from a set of playable races and classes as they learn the skills, feats, equipment, and technologies needed to make their character thrive as an SG team member. The book also covers how to be a Game Commander (GC). In the game, Stargate Missions are handed down from Stargate Command. Players may be asked to capture a point of interest, explore new worlds, retrieve important artifacts, rescue important VIPs, or assassinate/capture high-value targets. Stargate Missions will launch the Living Campaign that will allow the players’ characters to advance through the ranks of the SGC. Through an online system, players can track their character’s progression, earn unique items, and become a legend within the SGC. For updates on the Stargate Roleplaying Game, sign-up at https://stargatetherpg.com/

Beyond the Stargate Roleplaying Game, MGM and Brandgenuity continue to grow the Stargate SG-1 licensing program with recent products/partners including an upcoming fan convention from Creation Entertainment, collectible figures from Chronicle Collectibles, and tees from The Forecast Agency and American Classics.

Stargate SG-1 the television series, produced by MGM Television, picks up where the blockbuster film left off. Colonel Jack O'Neill (RICHARD DEAN ANDERSON) and his SG-1 team; Daniel Jackson (MICHAEL SHANKS), Teal'c (CHRISTOPHER JUDGE), and Capt. Samantha Carter (AMANDA TAPPING), set out to explore the mysteries of the Stargate. Each mission through the gate takes the SG-1 team to new worlds in a seemingly boundless universe.

About Wyvern Gaming
Wyvern Gaming is a game design company whose mission is to create "Approachable Games For Everyone." The company has been producing games since 2015 and have a track record of producing easy to learn card and board games for the hobby game industry. We have the drive to build games that people can enjoy. We love gaming of all types, everything from tabletop role-playing games to 3D virtual reality shooters. Our hopes are to turn our passion into a few gaming classics. For more information, visit https://wyverngaming.com



About Metro Goldwyn Mayer
Metro Goldwyn Mayer (MGM) is a leading entertainment company focused on the production and global distribution of film and television content across all platforms. The company owns one of the world’s deepest libraries of premium film and television content as well as the premium pay television network EPIX, which is available throughout the U.S. via cable, satellite, telco and digital distributors. In addition, MGM has investments in numerous other television channels, digital platforms and interactive ventures and is producing premium short-form content for distribution. For more information, visit www.mgm.com.

About Brandgenuity
Brandgenuity is a leading global independent brand licensing agency headquartered in New York, with offices in London, Munich and Hong Kong and ranked amongst the top 15 licensing agencies worldwide. The agency’s clients include BMW, Church & Dwight (ARM & HAMMER), White Castle, Edgewell (Edge, Banana Boat, Hawaiian Tropic, Playtex), Carmen Sandiego, MGM Studios (The Addams Family, Rocky, Pink Panther), ABI (Budweiser, Corona), NFLPA, and others. For more information, contact info@brandgenuity.com.


A previous Stargate SG-1 roleplaying game was released by Alderac Entertainment Group in 2003 using the Spycraft D20 System rules, but has been out of print since 2004.
 
Darryl Mott

Comments

Matrix Sorcica

Adventurer
Zat'Nik'Tel weapons for instance - they ALWAYS drop you in the series no matter who you are and kill subsequently (if human and not serioulsy augmented in a way the main characters weren't) so they are an IWIN button once you have a big attack bonus and multiple attacks...
HP doesn't represent actual hits, right? (It's an age old discussion). The "hit" that drops you to 0 hp is the first actual hit, when it comes to Zat'Nik'Tel.

The predominant enemy soldiers for most of the series were the Jaffa - so are they going to level with the PCs or become an irrelevant speed bump when encountered after about 5th level?
Well, the baseline for 5e is that low level enemies remains relevant at higher lvls due to bounded accuracy.

If there is a multiple attack progression for martial types, how do you narrate your FN P90 on full auto magically getting more attacks in if the trigger is pressed by one person over another?

The weapons in Starfinder have to level - which is an awfully counter-intuitive mechanic and not one I have heard is well loved. But then there is ultra-tech everywhere in that so at least it can be narrated without cringing - in sharp contract to Stargate where the main characters of the series continue to use the assault rifle for most of the many series, so that isn't an option either.
There are plenty of 5e based modern/sci fi games that handle this, plus many more d20-derived as well. It's solvable.
 

Zardnaar

Hero
5e is plain wrong for this.

Zat'Nik'Tel weapons for instance - they ALWAYS drop you in the series no matter who you are and kill subsequently (if human and not serioulsy augmented in a way the main characters weren't) so they are an IWIN button once you have a big attack bonus and multiple attacks...

The predominant enemy soldiers for most of the series were the Jaffa - so are they going to level with the PCs or become an irrelevant speed bump when encountered after about 5th level?

If there is a multiple attack progression for martial types, how do you narrate your FN P90 on full auto magically getting more attacks in if the trigger is pressed by one person over another?

The weapons in Starfinder have to level - which is an awfully counter-intuitive mechanic and not one I have heard is well loved. But then there is ultra-tech everywhere in that so at least it can be narrated without cringing - in sharp contract to Stargate where the main characters of the series continue to use the assault rifle for most of the many series, so that isn't an option either.

I really think that this is by no means the best choice of system for a Stargate RPG.
I would treat full auto as an AoE, DC 8+ proficiency bonus+ dex modifer half damage on successful save. Base damage 3d8, burst fire mode -2 to hit 4d8 damage uses 3 shots.

Zat's maybe make them a dex save, you fail and you're unconscious, 2nd hit dead, 3rd hit disintegration. Give them low ammo capacity and can't be bought, you have to raid the Gou'ald.
 

5ekyu

Adventurer
I would treat full auto as an AoE, DC 8+ proficiency bonus+ dex modifer half damage on successful save. Base damage 3d8, burst fire mode -2 to hit 4d8 damage uses 3 shots.

Zat's maybe make them a dex save, you fail and you're unconscious, 2nd hit dead, 3rd hit disintegration. Give them low ammo capacity and can't be bought, you have to raid the Gou'ald.
Unfortunatrly, the specs you give for zat dont match the series.

Looking at their scuffed and bloodied idea, I would try the following

CORE mechanic: Exposed. Most "hits" by any weapon cause hp damage. If a character is "exposed" each weapon type has additional effects that apply. Exposed is a condition that equates to being open for the more serious effects of a "good hit" to apply.

A character is considered exposed in cases like:
The character is bloodied (below 50%hp)
The hit is a crit.
The character is surprised.

For zat, the exposed effect eould be a con save with success meaning you get one turn before going to unconscious. Failure means going to unconscious. (Or certain features of character might allow retaliation strikes)

For gunshots, you get saves vs "shock".

Auto fire should in some way make exposing more likely- higher crit chance maybe) especially when used to hose down the enemy.

This general model likely produces a combat style where surprise does wonders st dropping folks, the first flurry of straight up combat is survivable but you are well incentivized to find cover.

Just one spproach.
 

Mistwell

Hero
There are a lot of people responding to this thread without reading the thread and seeing the designer posted a lengthy post about alterations to classes, hit points, equipment, levels, etc.. which address a lot of the complaints people are expressing. Maybe read what he said before proclaiming "5e can't work for this!!!!!"

Mutants and Masterminds and Spycraft both came out of 3e and did incredible things to alter the base system to make a new kind of system. This seems to be the same thing for 5e. At least read about the outline of those major changes first?
 

Aldarc

Adventurer
There are a lot of people responding to this thread without reading the thread and seeing the designer posted a lengthy post about alterations to classes, hit points, equipment, levels, etc.. which address a lot of the complaints people are expressing. Maybe read what he said before proclaiming "5e can't work for this!!!!!"

Mutants and Masterminds and Spycraft both came out of 3e and did incredible things to alter the base system to make a new kind of system. This seems to be the same thing for 5e. At least read about the outline of those major changes first?
Ummm...IMHO, if you are changing 5e that much to make it work, you basically are creating a new system and a good sign that the original system is not necessarily a good fit. (FYI, I did read what the designer posted, and that only further supports my sentiment.)
 

Zardnaar

Hero
Unfortunatrly, the specs you give for zat dont match the series.

Looking at their scuffed and bloodied idea, I would try the following

CORE mechanic: Exposed. Most "hits" by any weapon cause hp damage. If a character is "exposed" each weapon type has additional effects that apply. Exposed is a condition that equates to being open for the more serious effects of a "good hit" to apply.

A character is considered exposed in cases like:
The character is bloodied (below 50%hp)
The hit is a crit.
The character is surprised.

For zat, the exposed effect eould be a con save with success meaning you get one turn before going to unconscious. Failure means going to unconscious. (Or certain features of character might allow retaliation strikes)

For gunshots, you get saves vs "shock".

Auto fire should in some way make exposing more likely- higher crit chance maybe) especially when used to hose down the enemy.

This general model likely produces a combat style where surprise does wonders st dropping folks, the first flurry of straight up combat is survivable but you are well incentivized to find cover.

Just one spproach.
The stats were for a P90.
 

Zardnaar

Hero
Ummm...IMHO, if you are changing 5e that much to make it work, you basically are creating a new system and a good sign that the original system is not necessarily a good fit. (FYI, I did read what the designer posted, and that only further supports my sentiment.)
Not really they're using the 5E engine and probably having different skills and new classes to match the 5E genre.

IDK if the basic idea though (hit point based class game) is actually that good for the genre though. And things like zats.

Is O'Neil a level 6 Soldier, 4 officer for example. Daniel an archaeologist/soldier, Samantha a scientist/soldier, T'ealc pure soldier.
 

5ekyu

Adventurer
Not really they're using the 5E engine and probably having different skills and new classes to match the 5E genre.

IDK if the basic idea though (hit point based class game) is actually that good for the genre though. And things like zats.

Is O'Neil a level 6 Soldier, 4 officer for example. Daniel an archaeologist/soldier, Samantha a scientist/soldier, T'ealc pure soldier.
I see that too.
5e is not inflexible and a lot of games seems to have done a lot with it.
 
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Superchunk77

Explorer
Ummm...IMHO, if you are changing 5e that much to make it work, you basically are creating a new system and a good sign that the original system is not necessarily a good fit. (FYI, I did read what the designer posted, and that only further supports my sentiment.)
Completely agree with you.

On one hand you've got a very popular RPG system (5e) which works great for fantasy games (including Middle Earth). I can see the developers wanting to leverage the popularity of the system in an effort to garner more attention for their game. Fine.

On the other, from a mechanics perspective, you're trying to bolt a fantasy RPG (5e) onto a modern setting (Stargate) that uses high tech gear, firearms, completely new combat tactics, and zero magic. To me that seems like a lot of extra work and risk for very little reward. That's almost like trying to play a Warhammer 40k game using the Ponyfinder RPG book.
 

Mistwell

Hero
Ummm...IMHO, if you are changing 5e that much to make it work, you basically are creating a new system and a good sign that the original system is not necessarily a good fit. (FYI, I did read what the designer posted, and that only further supports my sentiment.)
There are two issues in play: 1) Marketability, and 2) Mechanical fit.

Going with any other system than D&D 5e is a MASSIVE hit to marketability. So you better have such a huge leap in mechanical fit that it just completely outweighs that marketability fit.

On the other hand, if you can tweak the mechanics of 5e to fit "good enough" while retaining that big marketability fit, then you go with 5e.

I think that's what is in play with this issue.

And I think it's an error to assume that a big change to the skeletal mechanics is a bad idea. Spycraft and Mutants & Masterminds changed the landscape for 3e for the better. Some of the games you think are mechanically better fits probably wouldn't even exist without some groundbreaking work which was done to modify 3e before, and both spawned mini-industries of their own. Sometimes the net effect of these sorts of alterations to an existing popular system gets you a lot more than you might think on paper before it happens.
 

Zardnaar

Hero
Never thought much of Spycraft d20, a few people who liked it didnt like the d20 adaption. Local gamestore owner loved it and stocked a lot of it which was bought by no one.

I assume they will just rewrite stuff to make it fit the genre better, thing d20 Star Wars or something. Resembled D&D mechanically but was different in various ways with different skills, classes, feats etc.
 

Superchunk77

Explorer
Going with any other system than D&D 5e is a MASSIVE hit to marketability. So you better have such a huge leap in mechanical fit that it just completely outweighs that marketability fit.

On the other hand, if you can tweak the mechanics of 5e to fit "good enough" while retaining that big marketability fit, then you go with 5e.
I understand the market share aspect of it, but a lot of people are slapping the 5e logo onto their products now and completely ignoring a lot of the fundamentals that went into developing that game. I won't name names, but there are some I've seen that simply take existing Pathfinder products, tweak a few skill names, and then market them as 5e products. That's just lazy design.

This developer needs to be very careful about how they implement the 5e mechanics into this Stargate game. There's a lot of risk doing it this way. Change too much and people will be upset that it's not 5e. Change too little and people will be upset that it's not Stargate. Either way, they're going to need to spend a LOT of time on mechanics which could have easily been avoided if they went with a different system.

Hence why I said they would be safer using a genre-neutral RPG system that's popular enough to grab some attention (like Savage Worlds), and then focus more on the setting fluff and adventures.
 

LuisCarlos17f

Adventurer
WotC should talk with 3rd party publishers for the feedback to create a d20 Modern 2.0. what could become the universal d20 for all the genres. Some publishers would like use other abilities scores, for example Courage or Grace(luck/karma/fate).

D20 isn't ready yet for a perfect value of challenge rating or XPs reward when a enemy is more or less dangerous if PCs have got enough weapons. For example in the movie Sylvester Stallone's movie "Cobra" Brigitte Nielsen's character couldn't face the main antagonist, the night slasher, only to hide and run away like in a survival horror, but Cobretti in the final fight could terminate all the cult of the new dawn. A dinosaur would be a nightmare for a ewok from moon Endor or a na'vi from Pandora, but a wookie or a klingon with the right weapon only would need a shot, and even he hadn't to be in the same region, only remote-control drone would be enough.
 

Mistwell

Hero
I understand the market share aspect of it, but a lot of people are slapping the 5e logo onto their products now and completely ignoring a lot of the fundamentals that went into developing that game. I won't name names, but there are some I've seen that simply take existing Pathfinder products, tweak a few skill names, and then market them as 5e products. That's just lazy design.
OK, but given the designer comments in this thread, we know that's not happening here. So, why bring it up in this thread?

This developer needs to be very careful about how they implement the 5e mechanics into this Stargate game. There's a lot of risk doing it this way. Change too much and people will be upset that it's not 5e. Change too little and people will be upset that it's not Stargate. Either way, they're going to need to spend a LOT of time on mechanics which could have easily been avoided if they went with a different system.
So the trade-off is you need to spend a lot of time and testing to get a 5e tweak right, versus saving that time but taking a huge marketability hit? Isn't the obvious answer to that you take the time to develop the tweak well?

Hence why I said they would be safer using a genre-neutral RPG system that's popular enough to grab some attention (like Savage Worlds), and then focus more on the setting fluff and adventures.
Safer for design purposes, but much more risky in terms of sales. And as sales is the ultimate goal...it isn't safer.

It's kind of unimaginable just how many people are playing D&D, following some level of D&D news, but have literally never even heard of any other Tabletop RPG. D&D is synonymous with Tabletop RPG to them. They would never be exposed to Savage Worlds, and would never hear news about this game, and would never even be anywhere to happen to see it (because it won't be carried in big box stores if it's not a 5e spinoff either). And on the extreme off-chance they'd ever see it, their reaction to it would very likely be "Oh I am not going to learn some other system if it's not based on D&D" as an initial reaction and never even look at it beyond that.
 
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gurpsgm

Explorer
I really hoped someone would pick this license up again. But D&D 5e for SG?! Really disappointed!
Too bad, the franchise has such potential. But levels and classes just do not fit, IMO. Seeing what a big "success" the first d20 version was didn't sink in, apparently.

Let us at least hope they get access to all the SG material. SG-1, Atlantis and maybe even Universe.
The setting really is a perfect playground for RPGs.
Actually, this is not true. I was a volunteer for Alderac at the time.

They did not do any more than five books because this was the time at which Sony had acquired the license. When Alderac tried to renew the license for Stargate RPG with Sony, they quoted a price that would have bankrupted AEG.

So, no more books from AEG for Stargate. This is what I remember, which may be a little faulty due to it being such a long time from then to now.

So do not take this as "official" info from AEG. I was only a volunteer at the time and had no official presence with the company whatsoever. YMMV.
 

Vilarin

Visitor
[FONT=&quot]First, I'd like to say I am a huge fan of Stargate from the movie onward, so anyone reviving it is a plus. Second I appreciate Mack Martin spending time to share what he can. I had the Alderac books and I had some great adventures with my group. If you spend the time you can get the atmosphere right. I say let's see how this turns out and give Wyvern Gaming a chance. As another person posted on here I'm getting up in years and have played a lot of RPGs over the years. I haven't been thrilled with D&D 4e or D&D 5e, but as Alderac proved a game can be fun and work.

By the way gurpsgm is correct. The Alderac books were impacted by the licensing issues.[/FONT]
 

Takei

Explorer
WotC should talk with 3rd party publishers for the feedback to create a d20 Modern 2.0. what could become the universal d20 for all the genres. Some publishers would like use other abilities scores, for example Courage or Grace(luck/karma/fate).
I'd also like to see a d20 Modern 2.0.
 

Mistwell

Hero
I really quite enjoyed the Alderac and played a few games and owned the core book. I had a blast playing it at a game convention once here in Los Angeles with a superb GM.
 

MechaPilot

Explorer
You can almost play Stargate using the old D6 system or Star Wars Saga.
I've used the Buffy the Vampire Slayer RPG to run Stargate games with great success.


Not sure class based hit points would work so well.
And how would zats work, high DC or no save.
Zats are pretty horribly inconsistent in the show. I can't recall a single instance of someone resisting one. And, the whole thing about stun/kill/disintegrate in 1/2/3 shots brings up a host of issues as far as how quickly the shots need to be taken, and how long the energy of a shot remains in the target. They would've been better off just giving it a stun and a lethal setting, like old-school phasers.
 

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