Stonetop RPG - Session post-mortems

CHARACTER INTRODUCTION AND SPRING BREAKS FORTH

Stonetop is a significant hack of Dungeon World (PBtA) such that it is clearly its own game written by Jeremy Strandberg (Perilous Wilds supplement for DW which is ported significantly in this game), illustrated by Lucie Arnoux, arranged by Jason Lutes, proofread by Rob Rendell and Matt Wetherbee, published by Lampblack & Brimstone.

Its a mythical Bronze > Iron Age-esque set game about the village of Stonetop, the people in it, and its efforts to survive and thrive in a world filled with threats and opportunities over the course of years. The game is played in seasonal chunks and we've settled on about 6 adventures and then move forward to the next season (each season having a move that frames the initial play of that season and has mechanical results).

Unlike Dungeon World, it starts with its own maps (attached below) but has an elaborate PC/NPC/Homefront generation, integration, and introduction and then you make a Spring Breaks Forth move to find out the initial threats and opportunities that will frame the opening of play. The game uses:

* Dungeon World's base move and gear/tag scheme (but a bit updated) with several interesting playbooks

* Dungeon World xp paradigm but End of Session questions tailored to this game (demonstrated/struggled with Instinct, relationship/opinion change of PC/NPC/group, learn about history/mythology, defeat threats to Stonetop, improve standing with neighbors, improve Stonetop)

* Perilous Wilds Followers rules (and his Danger/Discovery stuff and mostly his Journey stuff...which I'm going to use in full because the game is not live yet so there are some things missing)

* Homefront moves and stats (Fortune, Prosperity, Population, Defenses, Surplus) so akin to Crew in Blades in the Dark

* Advantage/Disadvantage (instead of take +1/-1) where you roll 3d6 and take best/worst 2

* A new move called Burn Brightly (which, once you've got enough xp to level but haven't spent it, you can burn 2 xp AFTER you've rolled to throttle up a result (eg from 6- to 7-9 etc)

* Blades-esque loadout system

* Loop that features x Adventures > Advance Season and reflect/update Stonetop > Make Season move to frame play




THE PCs

Dap the Lightbearer of Auspicious Birth (sort of a priest of sun-god type character) who is Driven By Hope to inspire others in the face of adversity. He serves as Stonetop's Chandler. He brings to bear his personal insight, luminous presence, and a myriad of light-themed powers bestowed upon him by Helios.

Gavin the Blessed who was Raised By Wolves and is Driven by Preservation to protect the natural world. Along with his three wolves, he serves as Stonetop's shepherd and he assists Demi with the cistern. He brings to bear his wolves, his ability to speak with the spirits and natural beasts of the wild, and his pouch of magical stock through which Danu heaps her nature-themed blessings upon him.

Cullen the Judge who was led to the ancient, haunted vault by the providence of Aratis to serve as her new Prophet and Chronicler. The line of Judges was broken long ago, but he will now take up the mantle to Seek a Path of Harmony that makes everyone happy. He serves as Stonetop's mediator and chronicler. He brings to bear his indomitable will, his symbol of divine authority (a great, black maul), armor, and the Chronicle to scribe the events of the world.

Trys the Storm-marked Heavy who was struck by lightning and lived to tell the tale. Since her brush with certain death and touched by Tor (the Rainmaker, the Thunderhead), the runic markings she now bears are a constant reminder that makes her Driven By Recklessness to protect the people who can't protect themselves. Her father Sigurd (whom she has a volatile relationship with) is the town Blacksmith and Trys serves as the Weaponsmith. She is armored to the teeth, packing heat, and swinging a sword arm steeled by years of smithing...if you wade into close combat to clash with her...well, I hope you've got your affairs in order.




STONETOP STATS, ASSETS, AND NPCs

Fortunes - 1
Surplus - 1
Size - 0
Population - 0
Prosperity 0
Defenses - 0

A pair of hardy draft horses, followers (large, powerful, keen-nosed, hardy): HP 10 each; Damage d6+3 (hand, close, forceful); Instinct: to panic; Cost: care & grooming.
A pair of horse-drawn plows, iron
A pair of carts (plus horse harness)
A wagon (plus horse harness)

Blacksmith/Farrier - Sigard (Trys's father). Gruff. Man of more hammer swings than pleasantries. His work is more than mere technology.

Midwife - Joelle. Negative by nature. She thinks Dap is a snakeoil salesman. When Dap was born, the people were in awe of the nature of the birth and this left her with a lasting case of deep resentment.

Stonemason - Llewelyn (Cullen' Uncle). Meticulous, precise, exacting. Shows his love and dedication due to his level of investment.

Mediator - Cullen.

Chandler - Dap.

Cobbler - Maldwyn. Surrogate mother to Trys. Sweet old lady who has no lucky with proteges.

Goatherder - Gavin (Wolves are Finn + Thorin + Leda).

Town Elders - Gwynn (ancient, infirm, visionary). Sawyl and Siana (Scooby Doo Man, respected, humorlous).

Tanner - Valwyn (Dap's father, good heart and likes to eat exotic things or challenges).

Cistern Manager - Demi (engineer). Gavin helps her out.

Weaponsmith - Trys.

Public House O/O - Innkeeps - Father Pryce

Publicans - Sawyl and Siana (also Elders)




SPRING BREAKS FORTH

When spring bursts forth upon the land, whoever is the most hopeful rolls +Fortunes:

On a 10+, choose 1 option from the Gains list; on a 7-9, choose 1 Gain, but a threat to the steading makes itself known or gets worse; on a 6-, threats abound (and don’t mark XP).

Dap was most hopeful. He rolled a 7-9. His player chose Opportunity and I establish a threat to the steading.

Opportunity - The neighboring steading of Marshedge recently drove out their horsebreeder and his family due to the claim of his daughters practicing witchcraft and cavorting with dangerous supernatural forces. They were headed west along the road to Stonetop with their family belongings and their Herd of Horses. Marshedge is 8 days travel to Stonetop via the roads...their exodus was 10 days ago...

Threat - Last evening was storm-filled. It was no different at the forge of Sigurd and Trys. When Sigurd's ill temper and frustration at a struggling project turned toward the young bellows pumper who assists the smiths, Trys interceded. It always gets heated between father and daughter but this time it got physical. He actually struck her...and then fled through the gates of Stonetop...out into the dangerous Great Wood that abuts the northern section of the wall. Morning has come but Sigurd has not come with it...




Anyhoo...

I'll update this thread with post-mortems as we play (and we play tonight).
 
Last edited:

log in or register to remove this ad

darkbard

Hero
Excellent stuff! Looking forward to your insights on how ST differs in certain ways from DW (beyond those already outlined, and with specific examples). It's easy to see how the game's Playbooks are inputs to and tailored to the setting and premise in a way DW's more generic-D&D-genre-fantasy Playbooks simply cannot be, except as specific outputs of the First Session world creation process; and, even then, ST's process produces richer, more embedded PCs, in my opinion.

What has been the player reaction to the PC creation process? Do they feel the Playbooks lead to sufficiently "heroic" archetypes, despite the "hearth" and community-oriented aspect of the game (not that these are inherently adversarial in any way, but that often seems to be the case in fantasy tropes, particularly the idea of "transcending" one's humble origins, rather than committing fully to them)? Do you feel like the First Session questions-and-answers have led to a plethora of possible pressure points for when it came time for Spring to Break Forth? How did you settle on six "adventures" between Seasons, and how are you defining "adventure" here? (I've read parts of the Stonetop playtest rules but had been holding off on devouring everything until the hard copy was released; with the unfortunate delay, I'm rethinking that strategy!)
 



Ovinomancer

No flips for you!
Excellent stuff! Looking forward to your insights on how ST differs in certain ways from DW (beyond those already outlined, and with specific examples). It's easy to see how the game's Playbooks are inputs to and tailored to the setting and premise in a way DW's more generic-D&D-genre-fantasy Playbooks simply cannot be, except as specific outputs of the First Session world creation process; and, even then, ST's process produces richer, more embedded PCs, in my opinion.

What has been the player reaction to the PC creation process?
The GM made a complete hash of this. Luckily, the players were great and we managed to overcome.

On a more serious note, the PC creation process is interesting. There's quite a lot that can be done prior to session, and I'd recommend doing work before the session -- there are a number of questions you can answer and you can build the mechanical bits of your character prior. This saves time in session because there's a lot to do for character creation. We had 4 players, and we took 2 1/2 hours going around. As always, make sure you hold on lightly to anything you do prior to the session.

The process does a great job of grounding the PCs into the steading and setting and to each other. Multiple pressure points are created, and relationships are established both between PCs and the steaders, both positive and negative. Good stuff here, really makes everything come up around the PCs and provide ample room for pushing and pulling them.
Do they feel the Playbooks lead to sufficiently "heroic" archetypes, despite the "hearth" and community-oriented aspect of the game (not that these are inherently adversarial in any way, but that often seems to be the case in fantasy tropes, particularly the idea of "transcending" one's humble origins, rather than committing fully to them)?
I wouldn't say that the playbooks really establish hero tropes. They're a bit more along the lines of creating troubled characters in a tight spot. If you look at the playbook moves, for every clear hero-trope move there's one that cuts against or is orthogonal to that. It's kinda like how in Blades you aren't playing heroes but criminals? You aren't playing tropey fantasy heroes, but rather people that have had things happen that push them into positions of having to do something. I'm struggling to adequately explain it.

Take my character -- I'm not from humble origins at all. My background is literally auspicious birth! The Stormblessed was struck by lightning, and is an important personage in town outside of that (one of the smiths). So, not really the hero's journey kinda stuff. More like Blades in that we're going to try to get our little town up and running and do things the PCs want to do but the game/GM/setting is going to be throwing things at us that attack these goals. I see opportunity for heroics and villainy.
Do you feel like the First Session questions-and-answers have led to a plethora of possible pressure points for when it came time for Spring to Break Forth?
100%
How did you settle on six "adventures" between Seasons, and how are you defining "adventure" here? (I've read parts of the Stonetop playtest rules but had been holding off on devouring everything until the hard copy was released; with the unfortunate delay, I'm rethinking that strategy!)
So, this is @Manbearcat's thinking, and we've kinda talked about it. I'm not sure this is the way to go, but it's a reasonable place to start and adjust.
 

Ovinomancer

No flips for you!
How cool, I love reading this! I've always wanted to run a stoneage game. Please keep updating!
Heh, this is actually something about the game setting that didn't even factor in my desire to play it. It's neat, and I've no issue with it, but I did not agree to or get excited about Stonetop because of the time-period.
 

Its a mythical Bronze Age-esque set game about the village of Stonetop, the people in it, and its efforts to survive and thrive in a world filled with threats and opportunities over the course of years. The game is played in seasonal chunks and we've settled on about 6 adventures and then move forward to the next season (each season having a move that frames the initial play of that season and has mechanical results).

The whole introduction reminds me very much of Glorantha, especially the way Sartar is portrayed as isolated villages and steads all looking to survive in a world of unknown strangeness. I think it would be easy (and lazy) to say "well, they're both bronze age settings..." - actually the feeling has very little to do with the bronze age, and much more to do with the 'mythical'.

I like the sound of this game a lot, especially in that it looks like it codifies progress through the seasons in ways which weren't mechanically supported in HeroWars. The structure reminds me of the (excellent) Glorantha-based PC game King of Dragon Pass.
 



Ovinomancer

No flips for you!
Just had our first play session after character creation. Loved it. We split the party right off the bat, with the two martial characters heading off on a 3 day trek to find some missing immigrants to the village while the shaman and the priest went into the woods to find one of the martial character's father (in a great moment, she said she was done with his foolishness and left finding him up to the other characters, great moment, really clarified that relationship). Hijinx ensued.
 

Aldarc

Legend
Thanks for the write-up, @Manbearcat. But first some thoughts from the rest of the thread:

How cool, I love reading this! I've always wanted to run a stoneage game. Please keep updating!
Technically late bronze age. But the name is a tad obfuscating...
First sentence from the Kickstarter product description:
Stonetop is a “hearth fantasy” tabletop RPG set in an Iron Age that never was.
;)

The whole introduction reminds me very much of Glorantha, especially the way Sartar is portrayed as isolated villages and steads all looking to survive in a world of unknown strangeness. I think it would be easy (and lazy) to say "well, they're both bronze age settings..." - actually the feeling has very little to do with the bronze age, and much more to do with the 'mythical'.

I like the sound of this game a lot, especially in that it looks like it codifies progress through the seasons in ways which weren't mechanically supported in HeroWars. The structure reminds me of the (excellent) Glorantha-based PC game King of Dragon Pass.
The creator Jeremy Strandberg has never actually played any game set in Glorantha. He said that he only became aware of it after multiple people brought those comparisons to his attention. I believe the original inspiration for this game was retired heroes defending a village that had become their residence. This is to say that it started as an anti-murder hobo fantasy adventure game. Over time it gradually became more of an Iron Age "hearth fantasy" game.

I also get "Iron Age Nentir Vale" vibes from this setting. Indeed, what's pretty telling about Stonetop, IMHO, is how one can tell that it was a shift from 4e D&D to Dungeon World to its own thing. The gods are a small, mixed collection of the World Axis pantheon and real world deities: e.g., Aratis (Erathis + Athena); Tor (Kord + Thor); Danu (Danu + Melora); Helior (Pelor + Helios). And behind most of playbooks are 4e classes (plus the Would-Be-Hero): e.g., Marshal (Warlord), Lightbringer (Pelor Cleric), Judge (Erathis Paladin), Blessed (Druid), etc.

That said, one reason why I first found myself drawn to Stonetop (back on its Google+ days) was from a different angle. There is a lot about this fantasy Iron Age that reminds me of Hallstatt Culture, who were the Bronze/Iron Age predecessors of the Celtic La Tene Culture. It's a personal fascination that started from seeing the Hallstatt exhibit at Naturhistorisches Museum Vienna around the first few weeks after moving to Vienna and then later visiting Hallstatt, Austria on multiple occasions.

I haven't started playing yet, but I don't think it's possible to read the playbooks and not want to play.
Agreed. The playbooks are evocative and fun.
 

That said, one reason why I first found myself drawn to Stonetop (back on its Google+ days) was from a different angle. There is a lot about this fantasy Iron Age that reminds me of Hallstatt Culture, who were the Bronze/Iron Age predecessors of the Celtic La Tene Culture.

This is undoubtedly why I'm also getting a sense of Glorantha, since a lot of play there is based on how the people of Sartar, with a lot of parallels to Celtic tribes, resist the invasion of a heavily Roman inspired empire.
 

Ovinomancer

No flips for you!
And behind most of playbooks are 4e classes (plus the Would-Be-Hero): e.g., Marshal (Warlord), Lightbringer (Pelor Cleric), Judge (Erathis Paladin), Blessed (Druid), etc.
Good post, just wanted to respond to this bit.

I don't really see the parallel here -- the playbooks have some tropes in common, but these are largely fantasy tropes. There's not much in the Marshal that really evokes the 4e Warlord, same with the Lightbearer and a Pelor Cleric. The playbooks are both more and less on each of these and it's only the larger archetypes that fit. "Sun priest" is a decent rough description of the Lightbearer and the Pelor Cleric, but that's about where the comparison stops. "Guy Who Gives Orders" might fit some of the Marshall backgrounds, but that's it -- there's little in the Marshall that evokes the core suite of abilities in the 4e Warlord. They're a damn sight closer to an actual warlord, though!
 

Aldarc

Legend
Good post, just wanted to respond to this bit.

I don't really see the parallel here -- the playbooks have some tropes in common, but these are largely fantasy tropes. There's not much in the Marshal that really evokes the 4e Warlord, same with the Lightbearer and a Pelor Cleric. The playbooks are both more and less on each of these and it's only the larger archetypes that fit. "Sun priest" is a decent rough description of the Lightbearer and the Pelor Cleric, but that's about where the comparison stops. "Guy Who Gives Orders" might fit some of the Marshall backgrounds, but that's it -- there's little in the Marshall that evokes the core suite of abilities in the 4e Warlord. They're a damn sight closer to an actual warlord, though!
From an archived Google+ post from Jeremy Strandberg:
And, here’s another #Stonetop playbook: The Judge. As always, feedback and criticism welcome and appreciated.

This was actually the first playbook I made for Stonetop, and it was the proof-of-concept for a lot of the structures that appear in all the classes (the backgrounds, the additional setting questions on the back page, the increased flexibility in choosing moves). Not a whole lot has changed since the original, but I don’t think many folks took a close look (as it was buried in with the original teaser).

Bit of trivia (for those who care): this whole project stemmed from a long-running D&D 4e campaign. The Judge was a role that one of my players came up with to justify playing a paladin of Erathis. Some of the coolest details (IMO) come straight from that character: the Chronicle, the Legacy background, the ancient armor as symbol of authority, the juxtaposition of scholar & warrior.
 



The Chronicler will post his session chronicle for last night’s game either today or this weekend.

After he does that I’ll peel out particulars and talk about framing > decision-points > moves > resolution > consequences.
 



hawkeyefan

Legend
Okay, so I play Cullen the Judge, and one of the roles he has is as the Chronicler of Stonetop. Connected to that, I have a playbook ability that rewards detailed session notes. So here they are below.

THE CHRONICLE OF STONETOP
First Spring, Week one

  • Spring has broken forth, and it brings new challenges to the folk of Stonetop.
  • After a violent storm the night before, and a violent confrontation between Trys and her father, she awakens to find that Sigurd hasn’t returned home after rushing off in anger. She heads to the north gate looking for him; Sigurd often goes to the cliffs that overlook the Great Forest when he’s angry. Trys finds the guard Grunhilda distracted from her duty with a face in her book. She is learning to read, and struggling to do so. She explains to Trys that Sigurd did leave the night before, he was very angry, and he hasn’t come back.
  • Meanwhile, a young boy named Eli approaches Dap the Lightbearer and chandler for his help. It seems Eli’s dog, Fang, didn’t come home last night, and Eli’s scared something happened to him. Dap suggests they enlist the aid of Gavin, the Blessed, as he has an affinity with animals. Eli admits he’s afraid of Gavin’s wild ways but is grateful to Dap for his help. Dap sends the boy home and then discusses the situation with Gavin, who agrees to search the perimeter of the town for the boy’s dog.
  • As this is happening, Cullen the Judge is approached by a member of the watch who explains that the Garrett family, horse breeders emigrating from the town of Marshedge, were due to arrive two days prior, but haven’t. The Garretts are a family of five, and they were accused of witchcraft of some sort by the Marshedge folk. The Publican of Stonetop bartered for their safety and invited them to live in Stonetop. A horse breeder would be an asset to the town. Cullen decides it may be best to investigate the situation.
  • The four friends meet up and discuss the situations. They decide it’s best to split up to handle the missing blacksmith, and the late arrival of the Garretts. Trys insists she doesn’t want anything to do with finding her father; she’s still to upset to deal with him. So it’s agreed that she and Cullen will head out on the road to look for the Garretts, while Gavin and Dap investigate the missing Sigurd, and if time allows, the missing dog, Fang, too.
  • Trys and Cullen pack for their journey. They decide to head out on the road for two days, and then return to town. Marshedge is about eight days’ travel from Stonetop, and they don’t want to be gone that long. Travelling along the road is relatively easy and safe, and in two days’ time they reach the location called Titan Bones. This is an area where traders and travelers commonly gather alongside the road. Nearby is a group of standing stones so large that it’s believed only giants could have placed them.
  • Several groups of travelers are here resting, and some merchants are presenting their wares. Cullen wants to ask about the Garrets, and Trys decides to browse the merchants’ wares. Cullen decides it is best to approach a group of pilgrims he sees to ask if they’ve seen a family of five along the road. It doesn’t go well. The leader of the pilgrims sees books and a scrivener’s kit in Cullen’s pack, which the pilgrim considers sorcery. He demands that Cullen leave the area, and camp out in the wilds away from decent folk. Some of the pilgrims present bottles of holy oil, concoctions they believe will protect them from evil spirits and sorcery. They threaten to douse Cullen.
  • Trys comes over at this point, and with her support, Cullen decides to press forward. He recognizes the apothecary’s mark on one of the bottles, and he knows that the potion within is harmless. He explains to the pilgrims that they’ve been shammed and repeats his question about the Garretts. They douse him and are baffled when the potions have no effect.
  • The leader stammers an apology and then offers some information on the condition Cullen provides him with a writ of liability that confirms the potions they purchased were fraudulent, and that the apothecary was at fault. Cullen happily executes the writ and provides it to the leader. The man explains that two days back, they had come across a campsite that had been abandoned A cart with some supplies was left behind, and there was even a stewpot still hanging from a spit above the firepit. Clearly whoever did this left in a hurry, or was forced to leave. Cullen and Trys decide to head to the campsite to investigate. They send a note with a traveler back to Stonetop to share with Dap, letting him know they will be a few more days than expected. They’re concerned about running short on supplies, but are confident they’ll be able to forage for what they need, if necessary.
  • Trys and Cullen head along the road two more days into the Steplands until they come across the abandoned campsite. Night has fallen when they find it, but clearly the description offered by the pilgrim leader was accurate. They salvage what supplies they can, but most of the goods are spoiled or have been befouled by the wildlife. Deciding it’d be best to investigate the site in the daytime, they set camp on a nearby hill that overlooks the site. They climb the hill and see a campfire off in the distance. They set a cold camp of their own in order to avoid being noticed.
  • During her time on watch, Trys hears a horse approaching the camp. Hoping that it’s a sign of the Garretts, and being comfortable with horses from her work as a smith, she calls to the horse to bring it into the camp. Unfortunately, her calls are met with mocking imitations, and instead three Hillfolk women enter the camp, spears aimed at Trys.
  • The women wear ominous headdresses, adorned with the hourglass symbol often seen on black widow spiders. They threaten Trys and say she can either join them, or she can feel their spears. They also gesture toward Cullen, who is just now waking, and hint at a much worse fate for him.
  • Cullen reaches for his hammer, hoping to spring up before they can do anything, but he’s a good distance away, and Trys decides she’s heard enough, and draws her sword. The Hillfolk had the jump on her, and they wound her, but her armor spares her the worst. She then unleashes a brutal attack on them, and although she takes another small wound, she makes short work of all three.
  • Cullen, amazed at her skill and her brutality, looks at the Hillfolk women and recognizes them as a tribe with a name that translates only to “Maneaters”. They’re a particularly aggressive tribe of Hillfolk women who take male prisoners who they mate with and then consume.
  • The horse slowly calms and lets them lead it away so they can make a new camp. It is emaciated, but its saddlebags mark it as a domesticated animal, very likely belonging to the Garretts. Trys and Cullen worry that the Garretts have been taken by this tribe, and decide to seek answers in the light of day. For now, this is where we leave them.

  • Back in Stonetop, Dap and Gavin discover signs that Fang was attacked near to his home; there’s a small pool of blood, and then a trail that leads to the north gate. Dap attempts to calm a frantic Eli and tells the boy that there is still hope the dog is okay.
  • They also learn from Pryce, the owner of the public house, that there were some trappers who came in spoke of a man heading out of the north gate and muttering something about “one life for another”. It seems this was Sigurd. They now suspect that the missing blacksmith and the missing dog are related, and that Sigurd attacked and absconded with Fang.
  • Outside the north gate, Gavin and his wolf Thorin quickly find Sigurd’s tracks heading down the switchbacks toward the Great Forest. Dap and Gavin supply themselves and then head out in pursuit.
  • They find a campsite where they believe Sigurd may have stayed the night before. Gavin uses his Spirit Tongue ability to locate a nearby line of proud trees, whose spirits are the sentinels of the forest. Gavin calls the spirits forth and asks them about the man who came through here. The spirits of the trees say that the man who passed this way is heading toward darkness, and that he has darkness within him.
  • They press on, and before long they come to a clearing. There’s an unsettling feeling, and the moonlight from above does not quite touch this place. They see Sigurd kneeling in the clearing, and holding Fang in one hand, and a knife in the other, preparing to sacrifice the dog.
  • Gavin’s wolf Thorin doesn’t respond well to the feeling of this place, and aggressively charges the clearing, hoping to place himself between whatever is there and Gavin. A pool of darkness forms before Sigurd, swirling and manifesting into an inky phantom. Its long arms end in wicked claws, and it looks ready to greet the charging Thorin. It’s clearly a thing of darkness, an evil spirit or a demon.
  • Dap steps forth with his lantern and Invokes the Sun God, blasting the area with radiant light. Sigurd falls in the clearing, and the inky entity recoils, unable to eviscerate the charging wolf.
  • Gavin uses his Danu’s Grasp ability, calling on the primal forces here to reach out and bind this foul spirit. The roots and vines and the very earth itself grasps hold of the fiend, harming it and forcing it to discorporate. As it fades away, Gavin and Dap know that it hasn’t been destroyed, it is the Dark Underfoot, and it has only been temporarily thwarted.
  • Sigurd realizes with horror what he has done and bursts out in tears. Dap quickly uses Bath of Healing Light on Fang, and manages to save the dog from death. He then turns to Sigurd and asks for answers. Sigurd admits, to his shame, that he still grieves his lost wife, who died giving birth to Trys. He’d always wanted a son, but instead got a daughter and lost his wife in the process. He somehow believed that this dark entity could give him a life for a life, his wife’s for his daughters. The sacrifice of Fang was just an initial step on that path.
  • Dap uses his Spring’s First Thaw on Sigurd, inspiring him with hope and mercy. He reminds Sigurd that Trys is his one connection to the wife he had, and he should honor that connection and not seek to corrupt it in some way. Sigurd swears he will do so, and begs Dap to help him, to guide him toward being a better person and a better father, and Dap agrees to do so.
  • Dap and Gavin then Return Triumphantly to Stonetop, having recovered the missing blacksmith, and also saved the missing dog.
 
Last edited:

Dungeon Delver's Guide

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top