Top Ten most infamous RPG Kickstarter Failures, by Shannon Appelcline.


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darjr

I crit!
I actually felt a bit torn about posting this. I think it’s important to warn people of some of the folks in this list, at the same time I think some folks have taken over a couple entries and are trying to right the ships. Also while Shannon seemed impressed with my contributed entry he didn’t use it.
 


TwiceBorn2

Adventurer
I funded the documentary-that-will-never-be (?), the Paizo Online Kickstarter (but I only backed for the table-top adventure books and flip-mats, which I did receive, so no loss there), and this dud from Fire Mountain Games: Throne of Night, a Pathfinder RPG Adventure Path.

The latter used his KS money to fund a trip to Africa and to back other Kickstarters.

The D&D documentary and Fire Mountain Games fiascos, along with dramatic increases in shipping costs and shipping delays, are reasons why I now wait for products to make it to retail before purchasing.
 

TwiceBorn2

Adventurer
I actually felt a bit torn about posting this. I think it’s important to warn people of some of the folks in this list, at the same time I think some folks have taken over a couple entries and are trying to right the ships. Also while Shannon seemed impressed with my contributed entry he didn’t use it.
Which one did you suggest?
 



Ryujin

Legend
I actually felt a bit torn about posting this. I think it’s important to warn people of some of the folks in this list, at the same time I think some folks have taken over a couple entries and are trying to right the ships. Also while Shannon seemed impressed with my contributed entry he didn’t use it.
Zombie Orpheus Entertainment was one of the groups that tried to save a couple of the Ken Whitman Kickstarters, though they had absolutely no involvement at the time they were created. Despite the lack of involvement their name had been used to draw in backers, so the president of ZOE at the time felt that their good name was being dragged through the mud, too. I've heard Ben (who was the then-president of ZOE) speak on the matter several times.

As to the two different pencil dice and the card dice Kickstarters those are things that almost literally any of us could have brought to fruition, and yet they "failed"?
 

I don't know any inside info, but it feels at least that Chaosium came out better on the other side of their own Kickstarter issues. It wasn't their first big crisis, as the card game boom/bust with Mythos also almost sunk them as I understand it.
 


Mezuka

Hero
In 2010, e20 Evolved was supposed to be the successor of d20 Modern. Promoted by Gary M Sarli who was involved in the design of Star Wars Saga.

"The e20 System is a new roleplaying game system for all genres, built using grass-roots game design and inspired by the best of the Open Game License."

It was never delivered. He promised a full hardcover rule book for GenCon 2010 with only 15,000$ in pledges. He did work very hard at the beginning but quickly discovered he had been naive about the timeline, amount of work and cost. After GenCon, he kept working on the pdf version. Updates started arriving at a slower pace. In 2014 he invoked mental illness misdiagnosed by his psychiatrist. In the adventure, he also lost the online gaming store he had been running prior to the KS.

 
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I have backed -- don't tell my wife -- more than 50 campaigns, most of them RPG, and never had any of them outright failed. (A few of them sucked, but that's a much better ratio than buying stuff in other ways, honestly.)

I am fascinated by how many people seem to repeatedly throw money at doomed campaigns. I do not think of myself as particularly wise or savvy. Other than not trusting anyone without a track record of creating products or campaigns with too many stretch goals that will clearly complicate matters, I don't know what I'm picking up on. Maybe it's just luck.
 

Aeson

Legend
I backed the Nystul one. I backed the Pathfinder Online one also. At least I got the rewards for that one. Recently I back two projects from Blacklist Games. Sadly, it doesn't look like I'll see anything from them. One is stuck in shipping limbo, the other is in development limbo.
 

Ryujin

Legend
I have backed -- don't tell my wife -- more than 50 campaigns, most of them RPG, and never had any of them outright failed. (A few of them sucked, but that's a much better ratio than buying stuff in other ways, honestly.)

I am fascinated by how many people seem to repeatedly throw money at doomed campaigns. I do not think of myself as particularly wise or savvy. Other than not trusting anyone without a track record of creating products or campaigns with too many stretch goals that will clearly complicate matters, I don't know what I'm picking up on. Maybe it's just luck.
I've backed 102 projects on Kickstarter, most of them films/shorts. Maybe only 4 or 5 on Indiegogo, because I don't like the "flexible funding" option. A couple more on Seed&Spark (both film projects). Of those, 19 failed to fund. Of the ones that successfully funded I've been burnt twice. Once was an interactive 3D production that doesn't seem to have ever been produced. The other was for the web series "Space Janitors." I eventually received all three seasons on DVD, not signed as promised, and on what appeared to be home burnt DVDs. I have a feeling that I wouldn't have received even that, except that I "off-handedly" mentioned that I lived about a 10 minute drive from the Director's front door, in the Kickstarter updates comments. Many who pledged never received anything. I have often wondered if there wasn't some shenaniganery with Geek & Sundry going on because backers were supposed to get first view but the show ended up on that Youtube channel first, instead.
 




darjr

I crit!
That one was cancelled. It didn't fail to fulfill, which is what the article is about.
I think originally it was about infamous failed kickstarters. Not just failed fulfillment. Mine was a response to a question before the article was written.
 

I'd heard of the first couple of those.

While I've backed a lot of Kickstarters, a very small number has failed to fulfill. I've had a handful that were really bad, and another handful where the product I had in my head is different enough from what I got that I regret it, but I don't think the ratio has been bad. It probably doesn't hurt that as soon as I see pricey looking add-ons or tier bonuses, I back quickly away.

(Now my much smaller steps into computer game Kickstarters have been a much more mixed bag, mostly in terms of them being horrendously late).
 

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