What are you reading in 2022?

It's been a while since I've read the Golden Compass, but I seem to recall that it was very much of the "we'll explain these things as we go along" writing style. In any case, it's a lovely series.

I've now moved on to The Golden Compass by Phillip Pullman. I'm only about 50 pages in, but I'm enjoying it so far. So far it really hasn't explained some of the main elements of the setting necessary to understanding the story, but I've also read The Way of Kings, so I'm fairly accustomed to that feeling.

I finished McGuire's In An Absent Dream. The Wayward Children series has yet to let me down - each book is just as magical as the one that came before.

Now I'm back to old sword & sorcery with the Robert Hoskins edited Swords Against Tomorrow.
 

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Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Agreed. It takes time to explain things, and the first book is great, the others good.
Not much to add in terms of value to the Golden Compass theme except to say ditto.

I have also found the sequel trilogy novels to be entertaining; although not as gripping as the first trilogy. However, second book seemed to be leaning more into a creepy spooky vibe that I enjoyed.
 

Scottius

Explorer
I just recently finished reading a couple of my recent Half Price Books finds. Silverglass by J. F. Rifkin was a fun little Sword & Sorcery romp that was basically a road trip story with an odd couple angle where a magic distrusting warrior and a sorcery practicing noble team up despite distrusting each other. Both of the leads are women as well which is nice to see in a S&S story.

I also finished Calling Dr Patchwork by Ron Goulart. It was an adventure-comedy about a married couple who solve improbable crimes. It was a short and light read but had an interesting setting with people with talents mutant powers like shape shifting, generating electricity, etc. I enjoyed it well enough and am looking forward to checking out some of Mr Goulart's other books I picked up at the same time

And now I'm starting in on the first book in the S&S anthology series Swords Against Darkness as found in Appendix N of the 1st edition DMG.
 





Cadence

Legend
Supporter
In the middle of Merrit's Dweller's in the Mirage.

Took a break from that and read John Sandford's novel "The Investigator" featuring Letty. Except for about two pages, I really liked it. I typically like his Virgil ones more than his Prey ones.
 

Arilyn

Hero
I am reading Jon Peterson's books on the history of D&D, and laughing at the part in "The Elusive Shift," where Gygax told a stunned audience the best use of dice are the sounds they make, and DMs are better off using their judgement over dice. Considering the recent heated debates, this just had me laughing out loud.

Also starting into The Rivers of London series. I believe I have a lot of good reading ahead of me in this series.

And a science book called "Entangled Life," by Merlin Sheldrake. All about fungi and the amazing ways they communicate.
 

Richards

Legend
Destroyer #63: The Sky Is Falling was sadly a lesser-quality entry in the series, given some of the best parts of any Destroyer novel is the interplay between Remo and Chiun and in this book they're each off doing their own thing for most of the story. Add in a plotline where Remo has no idea some crazy lady is blatantly out-and-out lying to him - something he should easily have been able to tell - makes this one a real disappointment.

So on to another Lisa Gardner thriller: Never Tell, about a pregnant woman claiming her innocence despite having been found standing over her dead husband's body with a smoking gun in her hand...and after having earlier been implicated in the shooting death of her father. It's another in the D.D. Warren series that I've enjoyed thus far.

Johnathan
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I am reading Jon Peterson's books on the history of D&D, and laughing at the part in "The Elusive Shift," where Gygax told a stunned audience the best use of dice are the sounds they make, and DMs are better off using their judgement over dice. Considering the recent heated debates, this just had me laughing out loud.

Also starting into The Rivers of London series. I believe I have a lot of good reading ahead of me in this series.

And a science book called "Entangled Life," by Merlin Sheldrake. All about fungi and the amazing ways they communicate.
You'll probably like this video:

 


When I look at some of the price tags on the books I picked up in the 00s, it seems a different world. I picked up a Greyhawk Folio in decent shape for just $20. Judges Guild stuff for $5-$15. Old D&D stuff has skyrocketed - that's like the one drawback to D&D's surge in popularity.

Before the DnD resurgence, you could buy almost any gaming stuff so cheap. Wish I'd made those investments!

I finished reading the Swords Against Tomorrow anthology. Pretty good stuff, though it's hard to go wrong with the contributing talent.

Now I'm reading Tolkien's The Book of Lost Tales, Part Two.
 

Cadence

Legend
Supporter
Finally finished the Ngaio Marsh mystery a friend most recommended (#8 in the Alleyn series Overture to Death. Stopped reading it twice over the past month or so, but stuck on a plain I plowed through and finally got into it.

Read a few more pages of Merrit's Dweller's in the Mirage. It's fine, but... I just don't have any momentum with it. Got the first Alleyn book on my kindle and am trying that.
 
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Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Finally finished the Ngaoil Marsh mystery a friend most recommended (#8 in the Alleyn series Overture to Death. Stopped reading it twice over the past month or so, but stuck on a plain I plowed through and finally got into it.

Read a few more pages of Merrit's Dweller's in the Mirage. It's fine, but... I just don't have any momentum with it. Got the first Alleyn book on my kindle and am trying that.
I found Marsh's Alleyn books to be more serious and yet also more enjoyable in some ways than Poirot. Alleyn just seemed a more human character.
 

Cadence

Legend
Supporter
I found Marsh's Alleyn books to be more serious and yet also more enjoyable in some ways than Poirot. Alleyn just seemed a more human character.
When I was little read Encyclopedia Brown Hardy Boys, And Holmes... but then not much Detective/Mystery since except the Garrett Files fantasy detective series and the Prey/Virgil books by Stafford.

I got into Nero Wolfe a few years ago, but haven't done any of the other classics. What would you recommend after I finish Marsh?
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
When I was little read Encyclopedia Brown Hardy Boys, And Holmes... but then not much Detective/Mystery since except the Garrett Files fantasy detective series and the Prey/Virgil books by Stafford.

I got into Nero Wolfe a few years ago, but haven't done any of the other classics. What would you recommend after I finish Marsh?
Well, Christie is without question the most popular. I believe at one point the only other book out selling her books was the Christian Bible.

I would also recommend Dorothy Sayer's Lord Peter Wimsey novels.

If you can find the Maigret books, they are more what we would call novellas now (most of them), and are translated from the French. If you can read them in their OG french, even better...

If you like locked room mysteries, you might like John Dickson Carr's novels, he is purported to be the master of the form. They were a bit dry for my taste, and neither of his most famous sleuths' personalities appealed to me.

Margery Allingham's Albert Campion series are hard to find in the library - and the character is a bit too... peculiar? for my taste.

If you want to DM me your google email, I can share with you my google sheets list of Classic mysteries. I need to clean it up a bit - but it's a good place to start. You can copy it and modify it to suit your needs.
 

I finished Tolkien's History of Middle Earth Pt. 2. Fascinating stuff, as before. Seeing the more villainous depiction of dwarves was wild.

I then read Robert Asprin's Little Myth Marker. If you want an objective review of that series, you can't get one from me. They're so tied up in the beginnings of my love of fantasy that I am incapable of providing one. Loved it, as I have the prior volumes in my re-read.

Now I'm onto John Shirley's Eclipse Penumbra. In between me reading the first one and started the second in the series, 2021 has gone from still being the future to the rearview mirror.
 

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