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What are you Reading? Magnanimous March 2019 edition

Well, that was a fast February. Finished reading King’s The Running Man. It was decent, filled with an overwhelming sense of rage and disgust. Some of the language is a bit rough, and I’m not sure if the racism and homophobia is supposed to part of the story, or just unfortunate casual usage for the time.

Next up is the first Liavek collection. Considering how much I loved Thieves World back then, I’m a bit surprised I didn’t come across this 80s shared world anthology series sooner.
 

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Next up is the first Liavek collection. Considering how much I loved Thieves World back then, I’m a bit surprised I didn’t come across this 80s shared world anthology series sooner.
Ooh, I don't remember which collection it's in, but Alan Moore's "A Hypothetical Lizard" is in one of those Liavek books. That was a great story, one I remember in detail today despite having read it literally decades ago.

Johnathan
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Near the end of "This Is Not A Game" by Walter Jon Williams. I've read it before and it was acceptable WJW (which is still a pretty high bar), I'm enjoying it more this time around. It seems there are more Dagmar Shaw books - I don't remember the end from the first time if it was set up as a series or he just added other books on.
 

Nice, it looks like that's in book 3. So far, I'm digging the series, so I'm sure I'll get there eventually. But yeah, the authors list is just insane: Gene Wolfe, Megan Lindholm/Robin Hobb, Charles, De Lint, Charles Saunders, Patricia Wrede, Jane Yolen, and more!

Ooh, I don't remember which collection it's in, but Alan Moore's "A Hypothetical Lizard" is in one of those Liavek books. That was a great story, one I remember in detail today despite having read it literally decades ago.

Johnathan
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Near the end of "This Is Not A Game" by Walter Jon Williams. I've read it before and it was acceptable WJW (which is still a pretty high bar), I'm enjoying it more this time around. It seems there are more Dagmar Shaw books - I don't remember the end from the first time if it was set up as a series or he just added other books on.

Finished up "This is Not A Game" and onto the next in the series, "Deep State". More satisfying then I remember from the first time around.
 

Finished up Liavek. It was quick, sharp read. Looking forward to diving into the rest of the series.

But it put Thieves World on my mind and now I'm re-reading Janet Morris' Beyond Sanctuary. Haven't read this in ages; grim, god-haunted Tempus was my favorite of the Thieves World dramatis personae.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Finished up Liavek. It was quick, sharp read. Looking forward to diving into the rest of the series.

But it put Thieves World on my mind and now I'm re-reading Janet Morris' Beyond Sanctuary. Haven't read this in ages; grim, god-haunted Tempus was my favorite of the Thieves World dramatis personae.

Oh gods, Thieves World. Part of me remembers inconsistant writing, soem Mary Sue like characters, and a multitude of shared-world sins. But part of me remembers how I would be so excited when a new book came out and all the fun I had writing them.

Trying to remember the name of my favorite character, but I will freely admit that I liked Hanse Shadowspawn.

Sadly, in more of my clean-outs where I brought bags of books to friends and told them to take that series went away.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Just got back from a business trip for a workshop in beautiful Lisbon, Portugal. I'm in northern US and appreciated the difference from shoveling snow.

Now, not as much reading as I thought - it was long days in the workshop and then nights with colleagues I work with but rarely am on the same continent with. But still got some reading in.

Read "All Systems Red: The Murderbot Diaries" by Martha Wells, a short story in an ongoing series of them. Don't know if this was the first or what, but it was enjoyable. Read Diaspora by Greg Egan, which felt like a travelogue of nifty (often mathematical/physic) ideas with a framing story around them. It was quite interesting enough but not satisfying in the ways a more traditional novel would for me.

I also got about half way through Ninefox Gambit by Yoon Ha Lee. This has been sitting on my TBR pile for a while. I had picked it up once and read a few pages and there was too much unexplained new concepts that it wasn't the light & fluffy reading I was looking for at the time. This time thoguh when I had more attention to give it I got further and things fell into place, including why they needed to hit the concepts in so fast at the beginning. Quite enjoying it so far, will see where it goes.

Still have Deep State halfway done - didn't want to lug an already half-read trade paperback on my trip.
 

Thieves World is a mixed bag, absolutely, but for me it’s foundational fantasy reading.


Hanse was my brother’s favorite character. He ended up with most of the books we had, rather than split up the set. This one, I still held onto, and have been idly picking them up again on my own.

Wait a minute...did you mean to say writing them?!


Oh gods, Thieves World. Part of me remembers inconsistant writing, soem Mary Sue like characters, and a multitude of shared-world sins. But part of me remembers how I would be so excited when a new book came out and all the fun I had writing them.

Trying to remember the name of my favorite character, but I will freely admit that I liked Hanse Shadowspawn.

Sadly, in more of my clean-outs where I brought bags of books to friends and told them to take that series went away.
 


Finished reading Janet Morris’ Beyond Sanctuary and I’ve got mixed feelings on the book. On the one hand, some of the language recalls Gene Wolfe’s Book of the New Sun. The book is inclusive, with its Sacred Band partners. The scope opens up vastly from the contained Thieves World short stories. The grim and morally grey Thieves World will always have a place in my heart.

But, there’s something holding me back from an unabashed endorsement. The offhand treatment of rape is jarring – it’s not even lazy grimdark shorthand, it’s just a thing that gets a sentence here and there, that bothers me. And there’s an at-times fuzziness to the plot and writing. Without having read a bunch of Thieves World anthologies (which I have, mostly, mind you), much of the book would become inscrutable.

Now I'm switching gears to Megan Lindholm's /Robin Hobb's Wizard of Pigeons.
 

Wizard of the Pigeons is done. It's a tale that could be read in different ways, but I think works best as a tale of magic and trauma. It's one of those books that makes magic feel magical. If you read it in such a way that magic exists, that is.

Next up is Herbert's Dune Messiah. Been afraid to follow up on the first book, for fear of the series being a let-down.
 

I'm reading Red Seas Under Red Skies, the first sequel to The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch. It's as awesome as the original.

Johnathan
 

Finished Dune Messiah. For such a short book, it is filled with layers of meaning. Some of which, honestly, disquieted, provoking all sorts of thoughts. And considering its page count, it packed a heck of a punch.

Next up is something lighter, with Kent Kelly’s Hawk & Moor: The Unofficial History of Dungeons & Dragons: Book 1.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Just finished Ninefox Gambit by Yoon Ha Lee. Very imaginative. Great use of making the setting matter to the plot. Quite far from "yet another SF story". The ending was a bit abrupt, she did a good job of telegraphing there were things we didn't know, but a bit of hint of what would have made the end smoother. A few other things I didn't see enough to follow home, but they were minor. All in all though, really enjoyable. 8/10, with an extra special award for almost-nonsensical but very RIGHT sounding descriptions around the uniqueness of the setting.

Most of the way through Deep State by Walter Jon Williams. It's the second Dagmar Shaw book. It's had at least one fist-pump-in-the-air, but hasn't been as consistently gripping as the first. Still enjoying it.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Finished Deep State. Ending was a little too pat, as in unsure why X would not be under the protection (or "protection") of the Y government. (Hopefully that both doesn't give away spoilers, and makes sense for anyone who read it.)

Really loved the visceral reality of how PTSD was portrayed.

Good book. I think there's more Dagmar Shaw book(s), will pick it/them up.
 

carolpegram

First Post
I decided to stop reading fantastic literature and start reading non-fiction and historical literature. Right now, I'm reading a book by Walter Isaacson "Benjamin Franklin: An American Life." Very interesting, so I'm recommending to read it.
 
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trappedslider

Adventurer
Last week I picked up some old (2000) books on armor dioramas from fine scale modelers ,so I'll check them out for tips and tricks. Also got a YA book that has been on my radar "Two can keep a secret" by Karen M. McManus also grabbed American lion : Andrew Jackson in the White House by Jon Meacham

Finished up the YA book,it was good, now to read about Jackson.
 

Today was a good day: I flew all over the country as a passenger, so I not only finished up Red Seas Under Red Skies but got about 200 pages into the third book in the Lock Lamora series, The Republic of Thieves by Scott Lynch. There are seven books planned in the series, but this is the last one currently published. I'm going to be one sad individual when I finish this book and there are no more to be had at the moment.

Johnathan
 

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