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What are you reading this year 2020?

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Apparently 10... Sanderson has said 2 sets of a 5-book story arc. He does seem to have slowed down in his writing, so that may be a while.

Yeah. He has so many projects on his plate. After Stormlight 4, I think he is going to finish Era 2 of Mistborn. There is a Warbreaker sequel up soon (important for Stormlight Archive). And his sci fi series Starlight is due a final book.
 

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KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Just came across my copy of Soon I Will Be Invincible - I forgot I loaned it to my eldest and it's been in her room forever.

While superheroes aren't my normal genre, I do find that I like deconstructions (and reconstructions) of the genre, as long as they have a good story to go with them. SIWBI (above) is one of them even if there are the occasional cringeworthy chapter. There's a decent amount in the Wearing the Cape series as well as The Legion of Nothing web series. But I've also been disappointed with some, such as All Of Those Explosions Weren't My Fault, though that could be because they mixed in vampires with supers and that's not chocolate & peanut butter.

So, what superhero deconstruction/reconstruction fiction with a good story would you recommend?

I don't know about deconstruction/reconstruction, but I really enjoyed Brandon Sanderson's Reckoners trilogy (Steelheart, Firefight, Calamity). It rides the line between adult/YA (protagonist is 18).
 

WayneLigon

Adventurer
I've been on a short fiction kick. Asimov's, Analog, Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Lightspeed, and more. I don't get as much reading time as I used to have, so it takes me about half a month to go through a single issue (since most of these are double issues done every other month), leaving me with a little time for novels near the end.

The latest thing I'm reading is Exploded View by Sam McPheeters. Near-future crime drama in LA, where the LA cops make use of real-time smart-surface tech and ubiquitous surveillance to solve crimes via augmented reality. For instance: tracking a subject through his daily routine simply because no matter where he goes, he can be tracked. And of course all the ways around such tech, and how it's employed, and why.

Other recent things:
The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Levinson, Marc
Light of Impossible Stars: An Embers of War Novel by Powell, Gareth L.
Bonds of Brass: Book One of The Bloodright Trilogy by Skrutskie, Emily
Re-Coil by Nicholas, J.T.
The Subjugate by Bridgeman, Amanda
 

the Jester

Legend
I'm out of books to read so my mom is kicking some of her stuff to me- it's not my preference, but it's definitely better than nothing! I just finished a Jack Reacher novel (don't remember the title) and am now working on Book of Bones. But we have a handful of stuff on order, and it should arrive in a couple of weeks.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I've been on a short fiction kick. Asimov's, Analog, Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Lightspeed, and more. I don't get as much reading time as I used to have, so it takes me about half a month to go through a single issue (since most of these are double issues done every other month), leaving me with a little time for novels near the end.

The latest thing I'm reading is Exploded View by Sam McPheeters. Near-future crime drama in LA, where the LA cops make use of real-time smart-surface tech and ubiquitous surveillance to solve crimes via augmented reality. For instance: tracking a subject through his daily routine simply because no matter where he goes, he can be tracked. And of course all the ways around such tech, and how it's employed, and why.

Other recent things:
The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Levinson, Marc
Light of Impossible Stars: An Embers of War Novel by Powell, Gareth L.
Bonds of Brass: Book One of The Bloodright Trilogy by Skrutskie, Emily
Re-Coil by Nicholas, J.T.
The Subjugate by Bridgeman, Amanda

Bonds of Brass is on my to-read list. Non-spoiler thoughts?
 

trappedslider

Adventurer
I'm currently reading: America's Constitution: A Biography by Akhil Reed Amar and once i'm done with it,i'm going to look at getting a copy of An Introduction to Constitutional Law: 100 Supreme Court Cases Everyone Should Know (I'm having a slight interest in ConLaw developing)

and for fiction,i'm reading Red Metal by Mark Greaney , Hunter Ripley Rawlings
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
We're doing a bit of a book club thing, with video conference meetings every week or two.

The first book was Every Heart a Doorway, by Seanan McGuire. I am not generally a fan of McGuire's work, but this was evocative and the prose style engaging.

Now, we are reading, A Long Way to a Small Angry Planet, by Becky Chambers. Only part way through, but the book reads far more "slice of life" than "there's a plot of important events here". So far, excellent worldbuilding.
 
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Doc_Klueless

Doors and Corners
With Conan 2d20 about to hit FG (see here ), I've almost completed my Complete Conan Omnibus (all the REH Conan published stories) and am dabbling with the Conan 2d20 ruleset/books in between cases in the OR.

REEEEeeeally looking forward to testing the FG ruleset for Conan 2d20 out.
 

Finished Cooney's Desdemona and the Deep. Holy carp, was it good! If I had to describe it, I'd say it was like if the movie Labyrinth was set in Victorian times and written by Clive Barker.

Now I'm re-reading Karl Edward Wagner's Midnight Sun: The Complete Stories of Kane, which, like The Dying Earth, I haven't read in about 15 years. Apparently the volume is out-of-print now and going for in excess of $200 online.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I decided to go through my backlog of graphic novels. One more to go, Invisible Kingdom by G Willow Wilson. But of what I have read so far:

Trees V3: Warren Ellis, Jason Howard (art). Ok addition to the Trees storyline. This volume tells one story of one place. It advances the overall plot of the Trees a bit; but it's still unclear how the trees influence human cognition and emotion. I gave it 3 stars.

Sleeper and the Spindle: Neil Gaiman, Chris Riddell (art). Classic Gaiman - taking a fairy tale or two, mashing them up; modernizing the perspective so that women have some agency. This is technically an illustrated novella or even a short story. The art is great, Chris Ridell I'm a fan. If you like Gaiman, you'll like this. If not, well - you've been warned.

Unearth Vol 1: Cullen Bunn, Baldemar Rivas (art): Well, the art is sufficiently creepy and distorted to be perfect for this storyline. I'm not sure what I was expecting - maybe some body horror; some mystery; maybe even some discovery.
Well I got all those; but the mystery turned out to be related to a particular fictional universe that as far as I'm concerned has been done to death; and the creator was an avowed racist. This took a new perspective on that old mythos; but as soon as someone said "Ftaghn", I was so done.
I gave Unearth 2 stars.

Coda Vol 1: Simon Spurrier, Matias Bergara (art):
I bought this book for the art. It's like a psychedelic version of Asterix's Albert Uderzo. Then the writing is by Simon Spurrier, who I've been enjoying his run on the new Dreaming book from DC.

It's post-apocalyptic; but it's post a fantasy world. So the magic is supposed to be dying, although there is something called "akker" which I guess is mainlining magic power. However, the way it's created is grisly and revealed in the 2nd/3rd chapter. The main character - called Sir Hum by some of the others in the novel - is scornful of the old days. He's practical, and focused on finding his wife, who is with the Urken. That tale unfolds with a delicious twist in chapter 4. Anyway, this first volume was a fun read, and I'll definitely keep up with the series. I gave this one a 4 of 5 stars.

Fairlady Vol 1: Brian Schirmer, Claudia Balboni (art): If you like mysteries, hard boiled detective stories, and fantasy, then you’ll like this. I mean come on, the first panel is an overhead shot of a town built in the ruins of a colossal mech or metal golem or construct. It gets better from there. The art style is clean line; and they really lean into a bunch of fantasy/D&D type tropes. I give this one 5 of 5 stars. Highly recommended.
 


Just finished the Chronicles of Prydain. I had never read the complete series before - just The Book of Three and (maybe) The Black Cauldron. Full props to Lloyd Alexander for a series that does everything the blurbs claim and more. These books deserve the praise and awards they've gotten over the years. 5/5
I see you too are a man of culture

But in all seriousness, good series to draw inspiration from for d&d campaigns

So is dragonriders of pern series (if you wanna throw a little bit of inconspicuous yet signifficant clark-tech in your games)
 
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We're doing a bit of a book club thing, with video conference meetings every week or two.

The first book was Every Heart a Doorway, by Seanan McGuire. I am not generally a fan of McGuire's work, but this was evocative and the prose style engaging.

Now, we are reading, A Long Way to a Small Angry Planet, by Becky Chambers. Only part way through, but the book reads far more "slice of life" than "there's a plot of important events here". So far, excellent worldbuilding.
"Small angry planet"

I instinctively thought "='s earth?"

Gave me a good laugh.

Ive never heard of those. Gonna have to read them now.

Edit:

Being a physicist i shouldnt spread misinformation like that though (sheepish look). I thought of earth not because its a small planet but because i always think of it as a speck in the universe. Actually, as planets go its pretty good size. Its not monstrous or tiny. There. Ive done my duty. Corrected my wrongs.
 

I finally finished Of Tangible Ghosts last night - it took me a lot longer than a book that size normally would because I really couldn't get into it: it was very slow-paced with not much going on and now that I'm done with it I still couldn't tell you all of what happened - I think the main character was supposed to have been possessed there by a ghost for awhile or something, but I couldn't swear to it. Confusing and boring (despite the main character being a former spy!) - I think that's all I ever need to read of L. E. Modesitt, Jr. (There are apparently two sequels; I'll pass.)

I'm trying out an urban fantasy novel next: Magic to the Bone by Devon Monk. We'll see how that one goes - I've never read anything by her before.

Johnathan
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I barely remember Of Tangible Ghosts... I recall being sort of like, "huh, that was a book". He came to a signing at my store for that book, and was a cool guy. Turns out we went to the same small college, albeit 20 years apart...
 



The Chronicles of Prydain are just absolutely magical. From beginning to end.

If you haven't already read it, the The Foundling and Other Tales of Prydain is well worth the read as well.

Just finished the Chronicles of Prydain. I had never read the complete series before - just The Book of Three and (maybe) The Black Cauldron. Full props to Lloyd Alexander for a series that does everything the blurbs claim and more. These books deserve the praise and awards they've gotten over the years. 5/5
 

Nellisir

Adventurer
The Chronicles of Prydain are just absolutely magical. From beginning to end.

If you haven't already read it, the The Foundling and Other Tales of Prydain is well worth the read as well.
There's a chance I have it, but not in the format of the rest of the series. I won't know for a little while - I still have 20-30 boxes of books that need sorting & shelving. It's definitely on my "find or buy this book" list.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
The Chronicles of Prydain are just absolutely magical. From beginning to end.

If you haven't already read it, the The Foundling and Other Tales of Prydain is well worth the read as well.
Recently re-read - unlike many series and books I loved as youth that I have re-read now in this century to disappointment (Hello Edgar Rice Burroughs, I'm looking at you...) - Lloyd Alexander's books HOLD UP.
 

Presents for Goblins

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