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What are you reading this year 2020?

Cadence

Legend
Supporter
Similar to your project, I have been thinking of reading the following Golden Age of Mystery authors in publication order. All together, year by year.
<snip author list>
And then write a quick blog post about each one as I go... It would be interesting to see how a) technology progresses in the novels and b) how major geo-political events impact each novel. For example, my sense is post WWII, many of series got a bit darker in feel.

I'd certainly be interested in reading the non-spoilery parts! Do you have a favorite that you've started reading? (A friend loves Ngaio Marsh, so I might do her next).

For Wolfe, I'm up to 1953 right now reading consecutively, and have read five more random ones up to 1965. I haven't noticed them being darker as it's gone, but the technology has definitely changed - and is particularly noticeable in "The Doorbell Rang" in 1965. Geopolitics has popped up a few times along the way.

I've been tempted to order the cookbook. And, if the Greenbrier were cheaper, might think about that for a vacation based on it inspiring the resort in one of the books where cooking was a big part of the set-up.
 
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KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Still reading Raising Steam by Terry Pratchett.

Still reading Warbreaker by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading The Rape of Nanking by Iris Chang.

Still reading Cynical Theories: How Activist Scholarship Made Everything about Race, Gender, and Identity -- And Why This Harms Everybody by Helen Pluckrose and James A. Lindsey.

Finished reading the Pathfinder 2E Advanced Player's Guide.

Started reading Exploring Eberron by Keith Baker.
 

Cadence

Legend
Supporter
Finished Rex Stout's "The Golden Spiders" (Nero Wolfe #22 from 1953).

I was expecting a little more outward rage, but thinking about it, the signs of inner rage were all there. He's really hit his stride writing them by this point.
 

I finished Stephen King's The Outsider (and it definitely fell into the supernatural realm by the end) and am now reading Touch the Dark by Karen Chance, a fantasy novel about a psychic (who can see ghosts and such) on the run from the vampire mob. The first chapter started off very strong so I'm hoping for good things from this; the book was another library book sale purchase for fifty cents whose back cover blurb looked interesting enough to give it a shot.

Johnathan
 

Finished Manly Wade Wellman's Who Fears the Devil? While it's not the most influential work on D&D in Appendix N, I'd definitely rank it as one of the best-written. The Appalachian horror-fantasy is so evocative.

Now I'm reading Stephen King's The Shining. Officially on my second King work, after a lifetime of avoidance.
 


Way back in the day when I was a kid, there was another kid that loved Stephen King. And also, whenever he was reading, would tear of strips of paper from the margins and eat them. That squicked me out for decades, despite it never really having anything to do with King's writing.

The change really happened as a result of my wife. She loved the It original movie series and other Stephen King adaptations. Eventually I decided to give his books a try, starting with The Running Man and have been slowly going from there.

Why the lifetime avoidance? (I have done the same, mostly)

And then why go in after a lifetime of avoidance?
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Way back in the day when I was a kid, there was another kid that loved Stephen King. And also, whenever he was reading, would tear of strips of paper from the margins and eat them. That squicked me out for decades, despite it never really having anything to do with King's writing.

The change really happened as a result of my wife. She loved the It original movie series and other Stephen King adaptations. Eventually I decided to give his books a try, starting with The Running Man and have been slowly going from there.
Hah, me too - that story squicked me out for another 20 years of no King. Thanks!
 

Cadence

Legend
Supporter
More Nero Wolfe. Kindles are dangerous.

#23 "Three Men Out" is a three parter:
Invitaion to Murder - A let down after the last few. Characters didn't stick out, a weak breaking of one of the main schticks of the series to.
The Zero Clue - An interesting math conceit. This one was short but fine.
This Won't Kill You - The main conceit was too over the top. There was a nice getting out of a jam, but that was about it.

#24 "The Black Mountain" is one that had several surprises. It was solid but not spectacular. Lots of background on Wolfe, and a bit too much physical activity.

#27 "Might as well be Dead" is another solid but not spectacular one. A lot of the supporting cast involved in this one. Kind of a let down afer #21 and #22 which I thought were particularly good.

(I'd read 25 and 26 before).
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Finished Battle Ground. My wife said that she enjoyed watching me read it almost as much as the book she was reading - all of the exclamations I was making, and shouting at characters, and having things dawn on me. It takes a book that has me invested to do that.

As mentioned before, this and Peace Talks were originally going to be a single novel. My comment is the pacing on them works better if you read them back-to-back.

Oh, and I freaking loved it. But I'm such the Harry Dresden fan, that was the likely result. But I do critique them when I feel they were weak.

Reading The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O., and some kindle unlimited urban fantasy schlock that is a step above not finishing, but I hope has a good payout. It has 4.5 stars and four or five books in the series, but it's a bit too transparent about everything, and the main character is a repressed Mary Sue.

On the other hand, TRaFoDODO is a decent read. I love some of the wordplay, while other parts the wordcraft feels more pedestrian - I wonder if the two authors each took point on different parts. The plot and characters are entertaining so far.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Reading The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O., and some kindle unlimited urban fantasy schlock that is a step above not finishing, but I hope has a good payout. It has 4.5 stars and four or five books in the series, but it's a bit too transparent about everything, and the main character is a repressed Mary Sue.

On the other hand, TRaFoDODO is a decent read. I love some of the wordplay, while other parts the wordcraft feels more pedestrian - I wonder if the two authors each took point on different parts. The plot and characters are entertaining so far.
Had to skip half your post, still waiting for BG from the library...

TRaFoDODO was a fun read. Time travel books usually leave me cold; and Stephenson is a mixed bag for me. Some of them are a delight, and a plunge through them (Snowcrash); other times I struggle to complete (Cryptonomicon). Fortunately, DODO was more like the former than the latter - and the time travel stuff didn't get too convoluted.
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Finished reading Raising Steam by Terry Pratchett.

Still reading Warbreaker by Brandon Sanderson.

Finished reading The Rape of Nanking by Iris Chang.

Still reading Cynical Theories: How Activist Scholarship Made Everything about Race, Gender, and Identity -- And Why This Harms Everybody by Helen Pluckrose and James A. Lindsey.

Still reading Exploring Eberron by Keith Baker.

Started reading The Shepherd's Crown, the last Terry Pratchett novel.

Started reading Night of the Assassins: The Untold Story of Hitler's Plot to Kill FDR, Churchill, and Stalin by Howard Blum.
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Had to skip half your post, still waiting for BG from the library...

TRaFoDODO was a fun read. Time travel books usually leave me cold; and Stephenson is a mixed bag for me. Some of them are a delight, and a plunge through them (Snowcrash); other times I struggle to complete (Cryptonomicon). Fortunately, DODO was more like the former than the latter - and the time travel stuff didn't get too convoluted.

Try Connie Willis. Her Oxford Time Travel books are AMAZING! And each one is different in tone. It starts with the short story Fire Watch, then The Doomsday Book, To Say Nothing of the Dog, and then Blackout/All Clear (was supposed to be one book, but got too long and was turned into two). Each book focuses on a different main character, but you will have appearances by characters from previous books pop up in later books. They don't read like time travel books really, because you can only go into the past, and she does meticulous research on the historical periods she uses. The time travel premise is fairly simple too. It's like a good Brandon Sanderson hard magic system. Here are the "rules" for how time travel works. By the end of the book, they find out something new about how it actually works. The Doomsday Book might be one of the best books I have ever read. A good pandemic read :)
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Had to skip half your post, still waiting for BG from the library...

TRaFoDODO was a fun read. Time travel books usually leave me cold; and Stephenson is a mixed bag for me. Some of them are a delight, and a plunge through them (Snowcrash); other times I struggle to complete (Cryptonomicon). Fortunately, DODO was more like the former than the latter - and the time travel stuff didn't get too convoluted.

I tried to be spoiler-free about BG, but the only way to know that is to risk spoilers. So good call.

There's an interesting series of pulp SF time travel books written mid-80s to early-90s, TimeWars by Simon Hawke. Each is a short read, mostly episodic - until the later books (12 total) where suddenly a bunch of threads start coming together and it really becomes cohesive. But how they treat time travel is well done for such pulp books, including alternate threads well before that was popular/common.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Try Connie Willis. Her Oxford Time Travel books are AMAZING! And each one is different in tone. It starts with the short story Fire Watch, then The Doomsday Book, To Say Nothing of the Dog, and then Blackout/All Clear (was supposed to be one book, but got too long and was turned into two). Each book focuses on a different main character, but you will have appearances by characters from previous books pop up in later books. They don't read like time travel books really, because you can only go into the past, and she does meticulous research on the historical periods she uses. The time travel premise is fairly simple too. It's like a good Brandon Sanderson hard magic system. Here are the "rules" for how time travel works. By the end of the book, they find out something new about how it actually works. The Doomsday Book might be one of the best books I have ever read. A good pandemic read :)
Thanks! Well done time travel is a pleasure (and poorly done time travel is ... not). I'll give these a try. I've enjoyed Connie Willis in the past, I'll give these a try.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Try Connie Willis. Her Oxford Time Travel books are AMAZING! And each one is different in tone. It starts with the short story Fire Watch, then The Doomsday Book, To Say Nothing of the Dog, and then Blackout/All Clear (was supposed to be one book, but got too long and was turned into two). Each book focuses on a different main character, but you will have appearances by characters from previous books pop up in later books. They don't read like time travel books really, because you can only go into the past, and she does meticulous research on the historical periods she uses. The time travel premise is fairly simple too. It's like a good Brandon Sanderson hard magic system. Here are the "rules" for how time travel works. By the end of the book, they find out something new about how it actually works. The Doomsday Book might be one of the best books I have ever read. A good pandemic read :)
So, I loved Doomsday Book when I read in the 90's. Then I read To Say Nothing of the Dog within the past 5 years, and liked it. But the Blackout/All Clear books didn't do it for me. Part of it is WW2 as a setting is meh. I did a big Connie Willis binge all around the same time, including Bellwether (cute) and Remake (I completely forget it) and Lincoln's Dreams (also forgot anything about it).

The time travel stuff is good. But it doesn't grab me so much. That's what I mean, even the best of the bunch - Connie Willis - leaves me feeling meh. Maybe it depends more on the setting the characters go to back in time? Like I liked the Crusades and the Victorian era; but WW2 didn't do it for me...
 

Nellisir

Adventurer
I've been off in my reading for awhile, but did read Planetfall by Emma Newman. I have to admit, books that are described with the words "beautiful" and "heartbreaking" are rarely my cup of tea, and this was no different. 2/5
I also read Mountains of Majipoor, by Robert Silverberg. I was struck by how much clearer Silverberg's worldbuilding was than Newman's. There was a Place, and a Person, and a Culture or two. (I realize that wasn't the focus of Planetfall, but I'm a bit puzzled about why it was SF at all.) It's always nice to watch a master work. Mountains is a slight work, but made for a nice hour or two. 3/5

Read Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett. My GF wanted me to love the crap out of it; I thought it was a nice, straightforward, very Pratchett-y book. 3.5/5?
 

trappedslider

Adventurer
(I realize that wasn't the focus of Planetfall, but I'm a bit puzzled about why it was SF at all.)
Takes place in the future on another planet among other sci-fi elements ( I haven't read the series, just the article on wiki)

I picked up the following from my library:

The Living Dead by George A. Romero and Daniel Kraus
A Little Hatred by Joe Abercrombie
A Declaration of the Rights of Magicians by H. G. Parry
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Finished Harrow the Ninth. Enjoyed - author took a risk, and I think she pulled it off. Now waiting for the conclusion.
Next up, Battle Ground, which others have said they have read. Looking forward to it.
 

Presents for Goblins

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