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What are you reading this year 2020?

Finally picked up The Tower of Nero (Trials of Apollo, The Book Five),so i'll start reading it tonight. I love the fact that one of my favorite authors, Harry Turttledove is willing to interact via twitter with his readers/followers. I asked him a question a couple of months back about a detail in one of his series and he answered me.
 

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I'm still reading my "modern" science fiction collection from 1938-1958, but it's a larger hardcover book and I'm off on an overnight business trip tomorrow, during which I prefer to read paperbacks because they're smaller and take up less room. So I swung by the library book sale yesterday and picked up Hell's Kitchen by Jefferey Deaver, the third in one of his first series, this one about a movie location scout who frequently finds himself involved in various types of trouble. This time it's a series of arsons he gets involved in trying to stop.

Johnathan
 

I finished War for the Oaks yesterday. It really was as good as people said, and influential. And it gets so much right about the magic of being in a band, of writing a song, of being on stage.

Now I'm reading Philip Jose Farmer's A Private Cosmos. Shouldn't take too long, which is good because my copy of Evan Winter's The Fires of Vengeance just arrived!
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Finished reading Cynical Theories: How Activist Scholarship Made Everything about Race, Gender, and Identity -- And Why This Harms Everybody by Helen Pluckrose and James A. Lindsey.

Still reading Exploring Eberron by Keith Baker.

Still reading The Shepherd's Crown, the last Terry Pratchett novel.

Still reading Night of the Assassins: The Untold Story of Hitler's Plot to Kill FDR, Churchill, and Stalin by Howard Blum.

Finished reading Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.

Started reading Dawnshard by Brandon Sanderson.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
I'm seeing people discuss books I come back to time and time again. War for the Oaks. The Stars My Destination. (Though "The Demolished Man" I think beats even that.) Soon I Will Be Invincible.

I do reread books, but I've got some that I just reread a lot more often than others. They aren't even my favorites, some I just go back to. What are yours?

Here's some of mine in addition to the above.
  • Lois McMaster Bujold's Vorkosigan Saga.
  • Emerald Eyes & The Long Run by Daniel Keyes Moran
  • Wearing the Cape series by Marion Harmon
  • The Dragon Never Sleeps by Glen Cook (same Glen Cook as The Black Company and Garrett, P.I.)
  • The first N Honor Harrington books, before it jumps the shark.
  • U.S. Robotics era Asimov robot short stories.
  • Pliocene Exile saga by Julian May
  • The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch
  • The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert Heinlein
  • Snowcrash by Neal Stephenson
  • Legend by David Gemmell
Gosh, I'm surprised I have time to read anything new. :)

Mind you, some of these are on my favorites list, but some of them aren't but still occasionally have this irresistible draw. The Dragon Never Sleeps I can pick up in the middle, or only read the A plot or the B plot. And I have a lot of favorites that aren't on my reread regularly (every few years) list.

So I'll repeat my question from above: what are your go-to rereads?
 
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Top of the list is definitely Tolkien. For years, I would routinely cycle from The Silmarillion to The Hobbit to the Lord of the Rings.

Other than that:

J.G. Ballard's Crash
Moorcock's The Elric Saga
Le Guin's A Wizard of Earthsea
Billy Martin's Lost Souls and Drawing Blood
William S. Burroughs' Naked Lunch
Ellis' American Psycho
Bradbury's The Halloween Tree
Bram Stoker's Dracula
Leiber's Fafhrd & Grey Mouser books (specifically the first four)
R.E. Howard's Conan yarns

So I'll repeat my question from above: what are your go-to rereads?
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I'm seeing people discuss books I come back to time and time again. War for the Oaks. The Stars My Destination. (Though "The Demolished Man" I think beats even that.) Soon I Will Be Invincible.

I do reread books, but I've got some that I just reread a lot more often than others. They aren't even my favorites, some I just go back to. What are yours?

Here's some of mine in addition to the above.
  • Lois McMaster Bujold's Vorkosigan Saga.
  • Emerald Eyes & The Long Run by Daniel Keyes Moran
  • Wearing the Cape series by Marion Harmon
  • The Dragon Never Sleeps by Glen Cook (same Glen Cook as The Black Company and Garrett, P.I.)
  • The first N Honor Harrington books, before it jumps the shark.
  • U.S. Robotics era Asimov robot short stories.
  • Pliocene Exile saga by Julian May
  • The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch
  • The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert Heinlein
  • Snowcrash by Neal Stephenson
  • Legend by David Gemmell
Gosh, I'm surprised I have time to read anything new. :)

Mind you, some of these are on my favorites list, but some of them aren't but still occasionally have this irresistible draw. The Dragon Never Sleeps I can pick up in the middle, or only read the A plot or the B plot. And I have a lot of favorites that aren't on my reread regularly (every few years) list.

So I'll repeat my question from above: what are your go-to rereads?
I haven't re-read anything in a long time; too many good new books. But desert island books - probably
Oz books,
Bujold's Chalion and Vor series;
Tolkien Hobbit and LotR;
a kids baseball book called Heart for Baseball;
Sandman GN series;
I can re-read Agatha Christie and Rex Stout and Ngaio Marsh over and over since they all start to blend into each other and I always forget the answers (except Roger Ackroyd).
That's off the top of my head...
 

HawaiiSteveO

Explorer
Dawnshard by Brandon Sanderson in preparation for Rhythm of War out this coming Tuesday 👍 . Same day as Tasha’s... lots to read!

As a side note, recall seeing something about interactive vampire storyline book ... details escape me that sounded intriguing.
 

I just started Watchlist, which is pretty different: it's a series of two novellas, The Chopin Manuscript and The Copper Bracelet, written as serial thrillers: Jeffery Deaver, who came up with the main characters and the concept of each story, starts and ends each novella but each chapter is written by a different thriller writer. Contributors include Lee Child, Joseph Finder, Lisa Scottoline...there are 22 authors in all. It ought to be interesting.

Johnathan
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Still reading Exploring Eberron by Keith Baker.

Still reading The Shepherd's Crown, the last Terry Pratchett novel.

Still reading Night of the Assassins: The Untold Story of Hitler's Plot to Kill FDR, Churchill, and Stalin by Howard Blum.

Started reading Dawnshard by Brandon Sanderson.

Just finished watching The Queen's Gambit and Pawn Sacrifice, so I am going to do a reread of Searching for Bobby Fischer.

As for the reread question, I rarely do, but some that I have:

Just finished rereading all of the Stormlight Archives books by Brandon Sanderson in preparation for Rhythm of War.

I've reread my favorite novel The Brother's Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

I've reread The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane.

There are probably a few more that I am not recalling. I wouldn't mind rereading David Edding's Belgariad series.
 

Mercurius

Legend
Currently re-reading Patricia McKillip's Riddle-Master books, and loving them.

I have a ton of books in the queue - a mixture of pre-Tolkien classics (especially drawn from the Ballantine Adult Fantasy), more re-reads of old favorites, some books I missed along the way, and a bunch of newer stuff.
 


McKillip's writing is gorgeous. She writes these ethereal stories that feel like folktales that might have been (see also Lord Dunsany).

Currently re-reading Patricia McKillip's Riddle-Master books, and loving them.

I have a ton of books in the queue - a mixture of pre-Tolkien classics (especially drawn from the Ballantine Adult Fantasy), more re-reads of old favorites, some books I missed along the way, and a bunch of newer stuff.
 


Definitely hugely influential and of amazing quality. I also think, as far as I've seen, he is the first person to put a black blade in a fantasy tale (the magic sword in The King of Elfland's Daughter).

Yep. Love Dunsany, who I see as arguably the second most influential fantasy writer, after Tolkien -- and one of the greatest.
 

Pawndream

Explorer
I finished The Cleric Quintent, a five novel series by R.A. Salvatore this week. I had heard positive things about this series over the years, particularly about the unique characters, but have mixed feelings about the collection.

On one hand, R.A. Salvatore is a gifted writer when it comes to creating light page turners that don't require a lot of thought, but on the other hand, I thought his combat descriptions were unnecessarily lengthy, detailed, and at many times, highly unbelievable. I know, I know, it's fantasy, but still. Also the main character having essentially a Yo-Yo as a primary weapon was a major suspension of disbelief for me.

At any rate, there were fun moments in the books, but also large spans where I wanted the author to narrate through combat rather than providing play-by-play announcer and color commentator for every. single. battle.

:)
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Also the main character having essentially a Yo-Yo as a primary weapon was a major suspension of disbelief for me.
But what about - Sukeban Deka?
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And Mamiya from Fist of the North Star
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And of course Jun the Swan from Gatchaman/Battle of the Planets
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Pawndream

Explorer
I wasn't aware the Yo-Yo weapon thing was so prevalent. I was not familiar with any of those characters you posted, but apparently it's a thing :)
 

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