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D&D General What editions of Dungeons & Dragons do you like?

What edition of Dungeons & Dragons do you like (choose all that apply)

  • 1st Edition

    Votes: 68 45.0%
  • 2nd Edition

    Votes: 85 56.3%
  • 3rd Edition

    Votes: 51 33.8%
  • 3.5 Edition

    Votes: 77 51.0%
  • 4th Edition

    Votes: 53 35.1%
  • 5th Edition

    Votes: 124 82.1%
  • Other (spin-off, please explain)

    Votes: 49 32.5%

  • Total voters
    151

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I'd say 5E is by far the best edition. I grew up with and played both AD&D during childhood, so they'll always have a place in my heard. I liked 3E and 4E initially, but they had fundamental flaws that I just couldn't overlook.

While I wasn't a huge fan of it, BECMI really should have been included. It's technically the longest running edition of the game.
 

I mostly want to take the pieces I like from the editions I've played and slap them onto 5e.

I know! It's just so frustrating that The High Council of Gaming prevents us from doing that.
I'm pretty much doing this with Pathfinder 1st Edition/3.5 by slapping some 5E esque House Rules into it.
 


aco175

Legend
A lot of the games, mostly in older editions depended on house rules to make them work better for every home game. I do not know many people that played 2e with death was at 0HP and not -10. Even 5e has had some older house rules creep in over the last few years.
 

Alzrius

The EN World kitten
While I wasn't a huge fan of it, BECMI really should have been included. It's technically the longest running edition of the game.
It's not quite the longest-running edition, but it's very close.

BECMI began with Frank Mentzer's Basic Set (the "B" in "BECMI"), which, presuming I have my dates correct, came out on May 1st, 1983. After this, the absolute latest I can find a BECMI-compatible product coming out from TSR is Troy Denning's The Classic Dungeons & Dragons Game: Epic Adventures with Wizards, Dragons, and Magic!, which came out on either May 2nd or May 4th, 1994 (I've seen conflicting listings). So BECMI lasted almost exactly eleven years.

(If you don't count that introductory boxed set as the ending point, then the last BECMI product would be the Poor Wizard's Almanac II, published on December 1st, 1993.)

By contrast, the AD&D 2E Player's Handbook came out in February of 1989, with the Dungeon Master's Guide following in May of the same year and the MC1 Monstrous Compendium Volume One following in June (I can't find exact release dates). Since the last AD&D 2E product was Die Vecna Die! (June, 2000), that means that if you start counting from when the PHB was released, AD&D 2E just barely edges out BECMI by a few months.

Please note my use of affiliate links in this post.
 

Ath-kethin

Elder Thing
<snip>I'd be hard-pressed to ever play 2E or AD&D again because I find the negative AC system to be too much of a roadblock to any sort of enjoyment. 3E cleaned up just so much rules kludge that I just wouldn't be able to go that far back anymore.
I should clarify that I play Rules Cyclopedia mostly with my 7yo and occasionally my neighbor or their kid. I replaced the combat matrix and AC system with an ascending AC and hit bonus system derived from it's numbers.

So even though my 7yo can add (and subtract) negative numbers, I decided to make it easier on everyone.

Frankly, changing that matrix is less impactful of a house rule than many I've employed.
 

Azzy

KMF DM
I've liked all the editions od D&D that I've played (which includes every edition except OD&D, Holmes BD&D, B/X BD&D, and 4e D&D). There are some that I look back upon less favorably (like 3.5), but I'd play any edition given the right group of people.
 



I liked them all. But 3ed and 3.xed are too close in my mind to be different editions. The 3.xed is the correction of 3ed. So they're one and the same for me.

But where is BECMI? That edition was fun. We had a BECMI campaign going side by side with a 1ed campaign.
Although I love 5ed, I play 1ed and BECMI in a heartbeat.
 

oreofox

Explorer
All the ones I've played. I may have played a game of 1e, but it was a single session 25 years ago that I don't even count it. So I checked all but 1e and 4e. Pathfinder 1e... I like it overall, but the type of people that played it ruined that edition for me. Too many people focused just on numbers made me quit. I think that's why I enjoy 5e so much. It came out at the perfect time for me, as my final game of Pathfinder happened in 2014, a couple months before 5e released.

I've thrown around the idea of merging AD&D and 5e (mostly taking the ability scores of AD&D and slapping them onto 5e)
 

I'm not really fond of any editions of D&D proper; I respect what 4e was doing though don't really like its effect, and while I liked OD&D and 3e at the time they came out, within a couple of years their limits (OD&D) and problems (3e) had put me off.

I do fairly well like PF2e, and think there's some real virtues to 13th Age and Shadow of the Demon Lord.
 

Jack Daniel

Engines & Empires
It's not quite the longest-running edition, but it's very close.

BECMI began with Frank Mentzer's Basic Set (the "B" in "BECMI"), which, presuming I have my dates correct, came out on May 1st, 1983. After this, the absolute latest I can find a BECMI-compatible product coming out from TSR is Troy Denning's The Classic Dungeons & Dragons Game: Epic Adventures with Wizards, Dragons, and Magic!, which came out on either May 2nd or May 4th, 1994 (I've seen conflicting listings). So BECMI lasted almost exactly eleven years.

(If you don't count that introductory boxed set as the ending point, then the last BECMI product would be the Poor Wizard's Almanac II, published on December 1st, 1993.)

By contrast, the AD&D 2E Player's Handbook came out in February of 1989, with the Dungeon Master's Guide following in May of the same year and the MC1 Monstrous Compendium Volume One following in June (I can't find exact release dates). Since the last AD&D 2E product was Die Vecna Die! (June, 2000), that means that if you start counting from when the PHB was released, AD&D 2E just barely edges out BECMI by a few months.

I would count Tom Moldvay's Basic Set as the starting point. (Just to give one example of why, prior to 1981, the original/basic D&D elf is a fighting man up to 4th level/magic-user up to 8th level; whereas from 1981 onward, the elf is a character class that goes up to 10th level. That doesn't change from Moldvay/Cook to Mentzer to Denning/Allston.) Since the last compatible product for this version of the game was the 1996 re-release of the Classic D&D Game, that means that Basic/Expert/Classic D&D was in print for fifteen years. Blows every other edition out of the water.
 

Cadence

Legend
Liked all but one of the D&D editions and spin-offs I played. Would rank those as:
PF1e > 3.5/3 > 5e > 2e > 1e > B/X > 13th Age
If I'm picking one to play/run now it's going to be PF1e or 5e.
 

Turgenev

Adventurer
I would have to go with BECM/RC D&D, 1st edition AD&D (I do use some 2nd edition stuff but I prefer 1st edition over 2nd), and 5th edition. While I've played 2nd edition AD&D and 3.0,they are far from being my favourite.

Cheers,
Tim
 


Volund

Explorer
5e because it's the most accessible for people, so it's easy to find folks willing to join a one-shot or a new campaign. 1e for the nostalgia of playing through classic TSR and Judges Guild adventures, and because it was the closest match for B/X since that wasn't one of the options. In truth, the more I play OSE, the more I just want to play that and not 5e.
 

MGibster

Legend
While I'd rather use a cheese grater to remove scabs from a festering wound on the bottom of my foot than go back and play AD&D, I have at one time enjoyed every edition of D&D except for 4th edition. I have fond memories of playing Ravenloft with AD&D 1st edition, running games in the golden era of 2nd Edition settings with Dark Sun, Ravenloft, and Al Qadim, and what a refreshing breath of air D&D 3E was (even with that stupid double bladed sword) since by 2000 it had been 4+ years since I got rid of all my TSR stuff.

I played a brief campaign of 4E and utterly despised the system. The only nice thing I can say about it is that they did a great job making sure every class was useful during an encounter. No mean feat. But I felt like I was playing World of Warcraft.
 

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