D&D General what is the worst homebrew you have seen?


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cbwjm

Legend
I saw a super saiyan class that kept getting ability boosts so that it was, fairly early on, a juggernaut. Not sure what its other abilities were, that was enough for me to ignore it.

Unlike some (perhaps most) people, I think DnDwiki is okay as a resource. There have been some very good classes and subclasses on there and even the really bad stuff can at least provide inspiration.
 

Okay, y'know what, I'm gonna go daggers out on this one for a particular reason

MCDM's Illriger.

It isn't bad because its not well made (its very well made), it isn't bad because it doesn't work (It very much works), it isn't bad because of its concept (Its fine).

No, its bad because they really should be able to balance better. Yeah, I get they wanted more 4E style, but, you gotta balance stuff within a party and having an entire class that just goes "Hey I'm Twilight Cleric levels of standing out" isn't a good look. Its bad because it disappointed me because I know I'm not going to be able to play it because I'm not just going to pick "Yeah this is the super powerful option to outdo the party"

I dunno, maybe they nerfed it since last I looked, but I remember it doing way too much for a 5E chassis
 

Yora

Legend
Twilight Cleric! That was the name of that Dndwiki class that became quite famous for a while sime 18 years ago. Had not thought of that one in ages, but there was immediately some vague memory forming in the haze when I saw thia thread.
 


Vaalingrade

Legend
Every nation was based on a 3.5 class and were vehemently bigoted toward each other. The big bads were sorcerers treated like Marvel comics mutants who were terrorists without a nation. It was clear they were fighting for their right to exist, but the DM fully expected us to see them as vermin to exterminate. The big goods were the paladins, trying to wipe out the sorcerers and rogues--like the entire nations and every last man woman and child. We were expected to consider them the Best.

First attempt, there was no party cohesion because we played how the classes behaved in the larger world and the fighter ended up leaving the party.

Second attempt, we rebelled and played two rogues, a sorcerer, bard and clerics (clerics were like doctors without borders) and went the freedom fighter / X-men route.
 


2e... a magic sword called "Sliver Shard" that had 6 1/2 pages of rules on it.

I can't remember all of it but I remember it was a magic (no plus) sword but then was +1 vs X or +2 vs Y for like types of creatures, but then if they have spells prepared it was +1 more, and the sword (a short sword) did a number of extra d6s equal to the plus against that creature if it hit, and different creatures had to make different types of saves based on what they were if the damage dealt was 20 or more. (I remember against trolls it was a DM save or die) It had different spell like abilities based on your alignment, and your level (like this thing had multi charts on it.

Anyway there were 3 sliver shards and if you put two together it becomes a long sword and the base weapon become +1 higher and it got more spell like abilities and gave you an increase to your charisma score, or if you put the 3rd with the other 2 it is a bastard sword and the base weapon becomes +1 more (now in some cases it might be +6 if it was against like a dragon with spells that was evil or something) and it gets more spell like abilities including Wish 3/day.
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
The first four letters are the key: "home." This is a rule that was written for someone's home game...it was created by a particular person, to be used by a specific group of players, for a specific reason. Saying "this stuff is the worst LOL" without knowing anything else about it (especially who it was written for and why) is kind of rude. I'm not gonna crap all over someone else's table.

Okay, I'll get off my soapbox. In the spirit of the thread:

The worst "homebrew" rule I've ever seen was last year, in our Eberron game. We were on a mission in the Demon Wastes, and our Dungeon Master was getting frustrated with the cleric, the paladin, and my wizard all using Banishment on his demons. So in the middle of combat, when the cleric cast that spell and one of his demons failed the save throw, the DM blew a fuse and declared that the Banishment spell no longer exists in the world. "It's gone okay? New rule, no more Banishment! You have to prepare a different spell for once and I swear if you start spamming it in every battle, I'll ban it also!"

We thought he was kidding, but nope. He was serious. I had to replace Banishment with Polymorph before the game could continue. (sad trombone)
 

The first four letters are the key: "home." This is a rule that was written for someone's home game...it was created by a particular person, to be used by a specific group of players, for a specific reason. Saying "this stuff is the worst LOL" without knowing anything else about it (especially who it was written for and why) is kind of rude. I'm not gonna crap all over someone else's table.

Okay, I'll get off my soapbox. In the spirit of the thread:

The worst "homebrew" rule I've ever seen was last year, in our Eberron game. We were on a mission in the Demon Wastes, and our Dungeon Master was getting frustrated with the cleric, the paladin, and my wizard all using Banishment on his demons. So in the middle of combat, when the cleric cast that spell and one of his demons failed the save throw, the DM blew a fuse and declared that the Banishment spell no longer exists in the world. "It's gone okay? New rule, no more Banishment! You have to prepare a different spell for once and I swear if you start spamming it in every battle, I'll ban it also!"

We thought he was kidding, but nope. He was serious. I had to replace Banishment with Polymorph before the game could continue. (sad trombone)
man I wish I could say I have never seen this (not with banishment but I have seen these)
 

jgsugden

Legend
Probably the stuff we came up with when we were 9-12 years old.
Oh so this right here ^!

I see out of balance, poorly thought out and offensive stuff all the time when I dredge through D&DBeyond Homebrew or other free resources to see if someone already built something I want to add to my setting (or to give me a starting point on updating something I had years ago in a prior edition). In the end, the worst of those are the ones that are almost good because I spend more effort to determine whether to use them or not - and get no benefit from it. But still - just a few moments of my time are lost.

On the other hand, there are decisions I made when I was very young that highly influenced my campaign world in ways that would persist for DECADES and brought nothing but frustration, and sometimes well deserved mockery. Some of them were whimsical attempts at humor. Some of them were my implementation of things that looked cool on film. Some of them were me thinking I was sooooooo clever - but wasn't. Some of it was a real balance issue. It wasn't all bad - but DANG IT some of it was icky. And, because I built it, implemented it and worked it into my campaign in a meaningful way, I was stuck with it and had to live with it because I've always considered it unfair to pull the rug out on players - once I add it, it stays unless the story takes it out.

There is no pain like self inflicted pain.
 


SkidAce

Legend
Supporter
The worst "homebrew" rule I've ever seen was last year, in our Eberron game. We were on a mission in the Demon Wastes, and our Dungeon Master was getting frustrated with the cleric, the paladin, and my wizard all using Banishment on his demons. So in the middle of combat, when the cleric cast that spell and one of his demons failed the save throw, the DM blew a fuse and declared that the Banishment spell no longer exists in the world. "It's gone okay? New rule, no more Banishment! You have to prepare a different spell for once and I swear if you start spamming it in every battle, I'll ban it also!"

We thought he was kidding, but nope. He was serious. I had to replace Banishment with Polymorph before the game could continue. (sad trombone)
I mean I understand their plight, but nuking it from orbit was a bit overkill. lol.
 

SkidAce

Legend
Supporter
Oh so this right here ^!

I see out of balance, poorly thought out and offensive stuff all the time when I dredge through D&DBeyond Homebrew or other free resources to see if someone already built something I want to add to my setting (or to give me a starting point on updating something I had years ago in a prior edition). In the end, the worst of those are the ones that are almost good because I spend more effort to determine whether to use them or not - and get no benefit from it. But still - just a few moments of my time are lost.

On the other hand, there are decisions I made when I was very young that highly influenced my campaign world in ways that would persist for DECADES and brought nothing but frustration, and sometimes well deserved mockery. Some of them were whimsical attempts at humor. Some of them were my implementation of things that looked cool on film. Some of them were me thinking I was sooooooo clever - but wasn't. Some of it was a real balance issue. It wasn't all bad - but DANG IT some of it was icky. And, because I built it, implemented it and worked it into my campaign in a meaningful way, I was stuck with it and had to live with it because I've always considered it unfair to pull the rug out on players - once I add it, it stays unless the story takes it out.

There is no pain like self inflicted pain.
Yeah, i.e. my penchant for naming things by spelling them backwards...looking at you "Drolkrad"
 



Worst thing I've personally written and implemented?

I'm currently running a game with mindscape psychic shenanigans, and I did a Matrix-esque 'training montage' to instruct both players and PCs on how to fight in the mindscape. One player pointed out that I'd basically created a whole new combat system that operated in parallel to the physical one, and that there was nothing stopping a party of 5 PCs from spamming 'stunlock' abilities in the mindscape as bonus actions, then running up and stabbing the helpless enemy in reality with their normal actions. So I changed that.

Alternately, it was the time we all got super drunk and I tried to invent a new game system on the fly, using coins to represent how 'popular' you were, for an adventure with the premise that terrorists were attacking our colleges fraternities and sororities. You could pay other people coins to make them do things. For one thing, it was just a bad system (e.g., "I use my popularity to tell the terrorist he's a poser and should just die"). But for another, one of the players found my coin jar and I was too drunk to notice him stealing a pile of coins so he had nigh-infinite popularity.

Worst thing I've personally published?

Admiral o' the High Seas, a ship combat system I designed for 4e that fell into the unfortunate middle ground of 'too mechanically dense to be fast' but also 'not mechanically nuanced enough to really make your tactics matter much.' It was the RPG equivalent of 'this meeting could have been an email.'

Since then I've made a much superior version, learning from the lesson of AotHS, which runs a lot faster.
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
add more demons, give them a legendary resistance, which they then use on the first Banishment…
Oh we wear down those legendary resistances early in combat: our monk would start the ball rolling with stunning strike + flurry of blows, then the bard would cast Hold Monster, then my wizard would cast Banishment, then the cleric would cast Banishment, then the paladin would cast Banishment. If the monster still had any LRs remaining, we would do it again on Round 2, then Round 3, upcasting it as needed if we started running low on slots. Because come hell or high water, we were going to banish that demon.

So yeah, I understand how annoying that can be. But in our defense?

They're demons, for crying out loud. The only reason they exist at all is to be summoned and then banished. Also: when you tell the party they are going to a place called "The Demon Wastes," then tell them that the big-bad is a big ol' demon, and then give them literally nothing but demons to fight for eight straight gaming sessions (I'm not exaggerating), you can't act surprised when your players make heavy use of Demon-Be-GoneTM.

If I had been the DM? I would have added in a couple of non-demon cultists...human fanatics who can cast Counterspell a lot. Or maybe I would create a custom demon that can cast Counterspell as a legendary action. (It's no coincidence that Banishment and Counterspell have the same range.) But there are lots of other choices...liches, beholders, dragons...
 
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