• COMING SOON! -- The Awfully Cheerful Engine on Kickstarter! An action comedy RPG inspired by cheerful tabletop games of the 80s! With a foreword by Sandy 'Ghostbusters' Petersen, and VTT support!
log in or register to remove this ad

 

D&D 5E What might the "increase in product" look like?

Yeah, compilations of smaller Adventures are going to be a thing moving forward, too: Used Candle keep as a natural evolution of Tales from the Yawning Portal and Ghosts of Saltmarsh combined with the surging stream of DMsGuild creators rising up.

Honestly, having now done a skim of all the Candlekeep adventures, having more anthology books like that in the future would be perfectly fine. The conceit tying the adventures to Candlekeep itself is easily dispensed with, as DMs could just have the books that trigger the adventures be introduced in whatever manner they see fit (found as treasure, available for purchase at a mysterious bookstore, etc.). Even Kandlekeep Rekonstruktion, which of all of the adventures is most intimately tied to Candlekeep itself, could easily be changed to a mad gnome in any town/city. Further anthologies with similar linked themes would make fine future releases. They might not quite be the equivalents to the modules of old, but for all intents and purposes, Candlekeep Mysteries is simply 17 modules all in one book...

(But please, WotC, give us at least give a few level 17+ adventures if you do continue with the anthology format!)
 

log in or register to remove this ad

Parmandur

Legend
Honestly, having now done a skim of all the Candlekeep adventures, having more anthology books like that in the future would be perfectly fine. The conceit tying the adventures to Candlekeep itself is easily dispensed with, as DMs could just have the books that trigger the adventures be introduced in whatever manner they see fit (found as treasure, available for purchase at a mysterious bookstore, etc.). Even Kandlekeep Rekonstruktion, which of all of the adventures is most intimately tied to Candlekeep itself, could easily be changed to a mad gnome in any town/city. Further anthologies with similar linked themes would make fine future releases. They might not quite be the equivalents to the modules of old, but for all intents and purposes, Candlekeep Mysteries is simply 17 modules all in one book...

(But please, WotC, give us at least give a few level 17+ adventures if you do continue with the anthology format!)

The introduction does a pretty good job of explaining how to mine the modules for parts, too, beyond just reframing them.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
What about them? Wildemount is mostly a setting book and AI a supplement, although somewhat unusual. Assuming you're responding to overgeeked's concern, I think they are talking about general players options that aren't tied to a setting or adventure. There's lots of that stuff sprinkled throughout, but Xanathar's and Tasha's are the only really dedicated books to players options.
I didn't see them on the infographic in the OP's post. If we are trying to extrapolate future works by looking at prior publications, might be helpful to have all publications listed.
 


TheAlkaizer

Game Designer
I agree that we won't get another Xanathar's or Tasha's book for a little while. These two books have been the two major adjustments to the course of 5E in my opinion. They always freshened the experience and brought some changes.

I fully expect at least one book with monsters and lore ala Volo's or Mordenkainen's. That's what we've been getting in between.
I fully expect a second setting this year.
I fully expect another adventure/set of adventures.

That brings us to five with Candlekeep and Ravenloft. This might be the increase. If we go to a sixth? I have no idea. Adventures seem like the easiest type of content to churn. Personnally, I would love a new book for GMs; additional rules, new magic items, new traps, etc.
 

With the first new Dragonlance novel coming out in July, I could see one of the releases tying into that with either a setting or a campaign. But my predictions are generally wrong, so who knows?

I do suspect that we will see a July book before the September big storyline Adventure (based on the UA testing schedule), in addition to a November book , which is a book every two months...quite an escalation, all things considered.
 


Burnside

Space Jam Confirmed
I would like to see more support - in terms of hardcover adventures - for some of the non-FR settings they have already released.

I think that's an obvious path for an increase in output. We have hardcover setting books for Eberron, Ravnica, Theros, and Wildemount but outside of DMsGuild no adventures for any of them that get beyond level 3 (in the case of Wildemount, we don't even have DMsGuild adventures).

In related news, how much do we think people are actually using Ravnica, Theros, or Wildemount for D&D? I mean, obviously some people are. But I don't get the sense that it's a whole lot, despite those books all selling well.

It seems odd to clamor for additional settings to be introduced when most of the ones they've rolled out so far are just kinda sitting there.
 
Last edited:

With the first new Dragonlance novel coming out in July, I could see one of the releases tying into that with either a setting or a campaign. But my predictions are generally wrong, so who knows?
I think the easiest Dragonlance book they could do would be a 5E adaptation of the War of the Lance adventures, with a bit of player-facing stuff up front, a slim gazetteer of Ansalon and the minimum required monsters for the adventures in the back. They're 12 adventures, but they're not huge -- look at how few pages G1-3 take up in Yawning Portal.
 


jeremypowell

Adventurer
I think your breakdown is likely correct. I'd tweak just one thing. Here's what I am anticipating as the new baseline:

  • 1 adv. anthology
  • 1 full adventure path/campaign story
  • 1 setting
  • 1 splat / monster / IP book
  • 1 box set
  • and an additional "floater" slot that is usually either a 2nd setting or a 2nd splat / monster / IP book

I think you're right that we will get 5 books and 1 box set per year as the new baseline; I just don't think we'll always get 2 setting books. But it's certainly possible that the model moving forward is indeed for 2 setting books per year: one in the classic D&D multiverse, one outside of that.
 

Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
I think we can expect to see more Settings, both classic TSR and Magic, maybe even others. The Guildmasters Guide to Ravnica format, the genre booster pack, is perfect for a marketable and modular approach, giving a cafeteria cornucopia for DMs.

I do suspect that we will see a July book before the September big storyline Adventure (based on the UA testing schedule), in addition to a November book , which is a book every two months...quite an escalation, all things considered.

I do agree that MTG settings in D&D is probably not going away, especially as specific planes may do a good job of fitting niches that D&D hasn't explored before (like Theros did).

That said, if there is a second setting released this year, I would expect it at the end of the year (November). I find it very unlikely that WotC would release two settings only two months apart from one another (Ravenloft in May, and another in July). Even if July needs to be Strixhaven, I assume WotC would have just moved the Ravenloft book to November (which is closer to Halloween anyway). Considering that didn't happen, I find a July setting book unlikely.
 

Jeff Carlsen

Adventurer
I wouldn't assume that they'll keep releasing settings at the recent rate. Demand for settings might be fairly sated by the recent releases, though I still think a Planescape book would be a good idea, and there's still no quality book on the Forgotten Realms.

Instead, the release schedule will follow demand instead of a set structure, and I fully expect some oddball releases that I could never predict. But there are some things I think are likely:

  • Collections of Adventures. Candlekeep is the first book of small adventures that aren't just updates of old adventures. Assuming it does well, I think we'll see more of its kind.
  • Continued rule supplements, like Volo's and such. I hope these stick to one per year.
  • A few products aimed at GMs. These have a smaller audience, but there's probably pent up demand. This may just be wishful thinking.
  • Fewer big storylines. There are a lot of these mega-adventures on the shelves now, so I expect the pace to slow.
 

Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
  • Fewer big storylines. There are a lot of these mega-adventures on the shelves now, so I expect the pace to slow.

They have done an annual big adventure every year, non-stop, since 5E started. I think the past 3 years at least they've all been released in September. No reason I can see why this would suddenly slow, especially as I'm sure head-honcho Chris Perkins' favorite thing is the big adventure.
 

darjr

I crit!
They have done an annual big adventure every year, non-stop, since 5E started. I think the past 3 years at least they've all been released in September. No reason I can see why this would suddenly slow, especially as I'm sure head-honcho Chris Perkins' favorite thing is the big adventure.
He does but also Candlekeep Mysteries was his baby.
 


Parmandur

Legend
I think the easiest Dragonlance book they could do would be a 5E adaptation of the War of the Lance adventures, with a bit of player-facing stuff up front, a slim gazetteer of Ansalon and the minimum required monsters for the adventures in the back. They're 12 adventures, but they're not huge -- look at how few pages G1-3 take up in Yawning Portal.

I did the math at some point, and I think it's on the forum...somewhere...and the OG 12 modules would just about fit, based on comparing words per page between the originals and 5E books, but it would be an double plus large sized hardcover, maybe even longer than Dungeon of the Mad Mage.
 
Last edited:

I wouldn't assume that they'll keep releasing settings at the recent rate. Demand for settings might be fairly sated by the recent releases, though I still think a Planescape book would be a good idea, and there's still no quality book on the Forgotten Realms.
I could easily see them waiting to do a comprehensive Forgotten Realms setting in 2024, alongside their big anniversary push, when they will presumably try and use the mainstream publicity to bring in a ton of new/returning customers.

"Here's your anniversary core books and here's a bright and shiny world to play in."
 

Parmandur

Legend
I do agree that MTG settings in D&D is probably not going away, especially as specific planes may do a good job of fitting niches that D&D hasn't explored before (like Theros did).

That said, if there is a second setting released this year, I would expect it at the end of the year (November). I find it very unlikely that WotC would release two settings only two months apart from one another (Ravenloft in May, and another in July). Even if July needs to be Strixhaven, I assume WotC would have just moved the Ravenloft book to November (which is closer to Halloween anyway). Considering that didn't happen, I find a July setting book unlikely.

For my own self, I would agree with you, however...

I also would have bet against the March 2020 book being a Setting after Eberron in November 2019, but Wildemount happened. And then I would certainly bet against a third Setting book for the next release...but then Theros was scheduled for release two and a half months later. So I wouldn't rely on a particularly staggered schedule, given how much of an emphasis Settings seem to be in the Winninger era.
 


An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top