A question on some game systems

Slit518

Explorer
For those of you who have played RuneQuest - how is it?
What editions are your favorite?

What TTRPG are the Witcher games based off of (I know the character and story are based off of novels)?
If you have played this TTRPG, how is it?

What TTRPG are the Drakensang games based off of? Is it a German TTRPG called Dark Eye?
If you have played this TTRPG, how is it?
 
For those of you who have played RuneQuest - how is it?
What editions are your favorite?
Awesome, for the era in which I played it, with little besides D&D to compare it to.
RQII was the version I played. I did get a good look at a later ed, 3 or 4, that included more elaborate rules for magic - Sorcery, I think it was - didn't grab me.

The mythology of the setting, though, is some pretty amazing stuff, too, regardless of system.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
I haven’t played RuneQuest proper, but have played other games that used the core system, like Stormbringer. I’d say it’s a relatively fun system to use.
 

Riley37

Visitor
I have never played the first edition of RQ, and I don't know anyone who played it as it was originally written: as a TRPG set in Homeric myth. I'd love to give that a try!

I have played the Glorantha version of RQ, that is to say, RQ as it became popular, with a setting more easily understood by a general audience. Talking ducks and so forth.

One session was mostly ho-hum, with players who weren't playing close attention to the story. A series of sessions much later on, with a different group, was rather enjoyable. The setting had depth; I learned more and more, one question leading into the next. The system, in terms of stats and mechanics and so forth, didn't particularly impress me, not for its era and certainly not by current state of the art.
 

pemerton

Legend
For those of you who have played RuneQuest - how is it?
What editions are your favorite?
I've mostly played RQ III, although I don't think we've ever used the Sorcery rules.

Characters have a lot of colour. Resolution is generally straightforward enough.

The system is set up to make combat an important aspect of play, but it also tends to produce fairly brutal results. That's probably the biggest weakness of the system.
 

muppetmuppet

Explorer
Combat will result in maiming was our biggest gripe with it. This is ok if that is the sort of game you want. It is quite similar to things like MERP in this regard.
 

Bobble

Villager
I played RuneQuest for about a year in '79 I think. The GM was good and it played well if a bit slower than AD&D. Never heard of the other games you mentioned.
 

aramis erak

Explorer
For those of you who have played RuneQuest - how is it?
What editions are your favorite?
I've run RQ3 as a generic bronze-age fantasy. Works really well for that. I never got into Glorantha until Hero Wars came out.

System is solid, combat deadly. CHaracter gen in 3E is background based.

Mongoose version isn't as good - but is playable.
 

Zhaleskra

Explorer
I'm only going to address question #1. While I have not played Runequest, I currently have a few books and while character creation is a little interesting, I really can't get by the way the default magic system works. The version I have is the first edition that Mongoose Publishing put out.
 

Slit518

Explorer
I'm only going to address question #1. While I have not played Runequest, I currently have a few books and while character creation is a little interesting, I really can't get by the way the default magic system works. The version I have is the first edition that Mongoose Publishing put out.
How does the magic system work?
 

Staffan

Adventurer
How does the magic system work?
It varies a bit between editions, and the Mongoose version is quite different from other ones. I have the second edition of Mongoose, and there it works like this:

There are several different magic skills across different traditions. The most common is, well, Common Magic. In a setting like Glorantha, these are widely available and most people know common magic appropriate to their profession - a warrior will know Bladesharp or Bludgeon, a merchant will know Golden Tongue, and a hunter will know Bandit's Cloak. Common Magic is a skill, and casting spells costs Magic Points (of which you normally have an amount equal to your Power ability score).

The second type of magic is Divine Magic. In order to use Divine magic, you need to form a pact with a god, usually by joining that god's cult and dedicating part of your Power to that god. You will still have that Power, but it won't generate Magic points for you. Instead, you can have one Divine spell appropriate to the cult per point of dedicated Power. Casting a Divine spell uses the Lore (specific theology) skill, e.g. Lore (Thor) or Lore (Demeter). You also have a Pact skill that measures your connection to the god in question. This determines how strong your spells are, and how easy it is for you to get them back. There is also a role-playing aspect in that a higher Pact skill is intended to make you act more like the god in question. Divine spells do not cost Magic points to cast - instead they are a bit like D&D spells in that once used they are gone and you have to regain them. The difficulty and time taken to do so depends on your rank within the cult - a mere initiate must return to a temple or shrine and roll a Pact roll once per day to regain them, whereas higher ranks get one attempt at recovery "in the field" and eventually shorten the time needed between attempts as well.

The third type is Sorcery. Sorcery is handle via two skills: Sorcery (specific grimoire) and Manipulation. Each grimoire has a number of spells in it, and the grimoire is usually not an object the PC themselves possesses - it is likely in the possession of some sorcery school/cult/master, and the PC has been allowed to study from it and learn its spells, but it does not belong to the PC. The game is a bit vague on how many spells are typically part of a grimoire, but about four to six centered on a common theme seems right. After gaining the Sorcery skill you need to spend some additional time learning the specific spells in the grimoire as well. The Sorcery skill is used for the actual casting, and the Manipulation skill isn't rolled, but is instead used to determine how much you can change the parameters of a Sorcery spell - when cast at their basic level, most spells are fairly weak but with appropriate manipulation they can instead become really powerful.

Finally, there is Spirit Magic. Unlike the other three types, Spirit magic doesn't use spells, but instead focuses on finding and either bargaining with or binding spirits for power. So if you have a bond with an ancestor spirit, you can call upon that ancestor's knowledge, and if you have a bond with a beast spirit you can gain aspects of that beast.

Old-school Runequest has the same types of magic, but handles them in different ways.
 

Zhaleskra

Explorer
To add to Staffan's answer, there's a reason the system is called RuneQuest. For the default magic system, you need to have a rune for that spell. If you want to cast a more powerful version of that spell, you need more/higher powered runes of the same spell. This makes spells a progression.

As a contrast, in older editions of D&D, a caster could learn Monster Summoning/Summon Nature's Guardian let's say III without learning the level I and II spells of the same name, which makes no sense in a way.
 
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Aldarc

Adventurer
I'm green with jealousy. How many of the people at the table had read (some or all of) Iliad, Odyssey, Aenead, or similar works? (Or Mary Renault novels?)
I seem to recall that a lot of people also use Mythras, which derives from BRP, as a more generic Homeric fantasy sort of game.
 

Staffan

Adventurer
To add to Staffan's answer, there's a reason the system is called RuneQuest. For the default magic system, you need to have a rune for that spell. If you want to cast a more powerful version of that spell, you need more/higher powered runes of the same spell. This makes spells a progression.

As a contrast, in older editions of D&D, a caster could learn Monster Summoning/Summon Nature's Guardian let's say III without learning the level I and II spells of the same name, which makes no sense in a way.
Oh right, I forgot that about MRQ1. That's gone in MRQ2. Runes are more of a flavor thing there, mostly for Divine magic. Each god has a connection to 1-3 runes and these serve as justification for why that god can grant these particular spells. For example, Thor might have the Air rune, so his cult would be able to cast spells like Call Winds, Clear Skies, Crash of Thunder, Lightning Strike, and so on. There is not a strict rule in the game that says "this spell is connected to that rune", so it's more of a flavor thing. I believe that's more or less how it works in other versions of the game as well.
 

Ralif Redhammer

Adventurer
Like [MENTION=19675]Dannyalcatraz[/MENTION], I've mostly just played Stormbringer and other Runequest-adjacent games. But I know there are many that think the world of Runequest.

As for the Witcher RPG, it's based on the Fuzion system:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuzion

For those of you who have played RuneQuest - how is it?
What editions are your favorite?

What TTRPG are the Witcher games based off of (I know the character and story are based off of novels)?
If you have played this TTRPG, how is it?
 
Old-school Runequest has the same types of magic, but handles them in different ways.
Yep. RQ 3rd added sorcery.
The RQII I played had Battlemagic, which you just learned and spent POW to use. Battlemagic used a focus, like a lesser rune, that you needed to cast it, and your own POW. You could also get a Matrix, a magic item that 'knew' the battlemagic for you, and Power Crystals - drops of god's blood shed before time - that you could store POW in, then recover it, yourself, so you could use some battlemagic without depleting it (POW was the fuel for battle magic, and the attack stat, and the defense against it, so, yeah.)
Rune Magic, which you got by sacrificing POW, and was re-useable if a Priest or one-time as an Initiate [sblock="ooh, listen to me talk about an old character"]the character I played most was in the Black Fang Brotherhood, and specialized in stealth, high POW gave you a stealth penalty, so whenever he crossed that line, he'd sacrifice for the cult-special rune magic: Shattering, which was a nasty little attack spell, that he'd use, make a POW gain roll, and get the stealth penalty back - POW gain rolls weren't easy, it was just an ironic run of luck.[/sblock]
And, finally, there were Shamans who made deals with spirits and stored POW on the spirit plane, so they could far exceed the human max of 21.
 

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