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5E Advantages of 5E spell casting

My home rules are a Frankensteinian kitbash on a stout AD&D skeleton. Part of this is my adaption of aspects of later editions while keeping the whole as simple and elegant as possible.

I've noticed that it seems like 5E spell casting is different in that there isn't the pyramid of spells anymore. A caster can cast their level + attribute bonus in spells per day. Typically, it seems that with previous editions wizards had about 1.5 times their levels in spells, particularly after 5th caster level. I was wondering what people found advantageous about this and other aspects of the magic system of 5E?
 

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BlivetWidget

Explorer
In 5E, the number of spells you can cast is determined by the spells slots granted to you on your class table. It does not depend on your attributes, and only depends on your level insofar as your level tells you where on the table to check for spell slots.

The number of spells you can prepare depends on your level and your attribute bonus, but has no bearing on the number of times spells can be cast. Casting a prepared spell does not un-prepare it.
 

prabe

Aspiring Lurker (He/Him)
Supporter
@BlivetWidget does a good job of explaining the difference between your description of your understanding and the rules. As to what's advantageous, an admittedly incomplete list: Those of us who never really liked the Vancian-esque need to prepare a spell more than once to cast it more than once find the 5E system a bit more natural; the upcasting mechanic is elegant in principle, if a little underwhelming in practice; the limits on spells known/prepared serve as at least something of a drag on spellcasters, improving intra-party balance.
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
The other advantage is cantrips. You don't need to worry about running out of spells and having to rely on throwing darts.

On the other hand, I generally don't hand out a lot of wands or other toys for wizards.
 

Li Shenron

Legend
I was wondering what people found advantageous about this and other aspects of the magic system of 5E?
I was fine with vancian magic of past editions but I learned to appreciate the 5e way.

It is tactically easier because you don't have to estimate how may castings of each prepared spell you will need.

It makes you feel you are utilizing your whole allotment of spells slots more efficiently. In older editions you more often ended up with unspent slots you occupied with emergency spells only to see the emergency never occurred. In 5e at most you waste a preparation but you can still use your slots with something else, especially once you consider this together with 5e spells scalability on the fly.

Increased slots usage efficiency actually means the game can offer less daily slots, particularly of levels 6-9, keeping max power lower.

So both the number of prepared spells and daily slots is lower than past editions. Somewhat less power and less flexibility, as well as less stress and responsibility. As a someone who typically plays spellcasters especially Wizards, I like it!
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
Increased slots usage efficiency actually means the game can offer less daily slots, particularly of levels 6-9, keeping max power lower.
I think this is huge. In classic Vancian casting, a wizard who correctly guessed what spells they would use during the day (or cheated) was far more efficient than a wizard who prepared spells for contingencies that never ended up occurring. In 5e’s neo-vancian system, you don’t miss out on spells per day if you thought you’d need three fireballs and only ended up needing one. You just use those slots to cast something else.
 

There are also ritual spells (which are mostly limited to certain lower level utility spells), which you can cast without using a spell slot by spending 10 minutes. If you're a wizard, you don't even have to have them prepared.

So both the number of prepared spells and daily slots is lower than past editions. Somewhat less power and less flexibility, as well as less stress and responsibility. As a someone who typically plays spellcasters especially Wizards, I like it!
I would say the flexibility is different rather than less, and I'm not sure I'd agree with the idea of less power overall.
 

Ath-kethin

Elder Thing
The 5e approach to wizards (and really the entire WotC-era approach to wizards) attempts to downplay the advantage of a high Intelligence in favor of more general utility. In past editions, a properly prepared wizard (that is, one willing and able to research a situation ahead of time and memorize the correct spells to handle it) could sleep through most encounters. The point of wizards was that they were smart, used those smarts to inform their choices, and sacrificed a great deal in terms of health and physical training for those smarts.

The problem is, that took players being smart, too, or at least players knowing how to play smart, and many players found that intimidating or unappealing. But there wasn't really a middle ground; as a wizard you were smart (and lucky!) or you were dead. Many people understandably felt that this wasn't really the most fun approach.

So now wizards don't need to be smart, and neither do players. I'm not 100% happy with the 5e approach to wizards (they're easily my least favorite 5e class), but I can absolutely understand why WotC wanted to lower the barrier (or perceived barrier) to entry for them.
 
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Okay, it doesn't sound too dissimilar to what I do now.

Right now in my game a 5th level magician with a 16 INT can cast 5 (3 + 2) first / 2 second / 1 third level spells. They can learn the same number and cast as they wish. The INT bonus adds to the first level spells castable and known.

Under 5E it looks like the same magician would cast 4 / 3 / 1 spells and would know 7 spells (5 + 2) in total and can cast them as they wish. In both cases the level of the spell known needs to match that of the spell slot. The INT bonus only adds to the spells known.

Are there any rules for interrupting, hampering, or imposing penalties to the spell casting? You can still move and cast, correct?
 


NotAYakk

Legend
You can move and cast.

If you attempt a ranged attack while in melee range of a hostile, you suck at it.

Concentration is a big thing; the most efficient 5e spells require it, which both means 1 up at a time, and ability for the spell to be disrupted.
 


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