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Age of Sigmar's Cover Art Unveiled

Cubicle 7 has just unveiled John Grenier's cover art for the upcoming Age of Sigmar RPG, coming later this year.


sigmar.jpg

"On the cover itself, you can see a band of heroes from across the Mortal Realms facing down the forces of Chaos and the undead legions of Nagash, the Lord of Death. Our group of heroes is made up of a valiant Knight-Questor of the Stormcast Eternals, a devoted Excelsior Warpriest, an Isharann Tidecaster of the mysterious Idoneth Deepkin, a resourceful Endrinrigger of the Kharadron Overlords, and a towering Kurnoth Hunter of the Sylvaneth."


Age of Sigmar is a d6 dice pool game set after the Age of Chaos, at a time where Sigmar's return kindles hope in the world. However, the Age of Death looms, heralded by Nagash the Undying King, and the players take on the roles of the heroes tasked to drive back the evil forces.

Below is the full press release.

The Age of Sigmar

The Age of Chaos saw the Mortal Realms overrun with violence and death, but Sigmar’s return and the beginning of the Age of Sigmar saw hope rekindled. But now Nagash, the Undying King and Lord of Death, has set a thousand-year plan in motion. The dead stalk the lands and the mighty Stormcast Eternals are stretched to the brink. The Realms need heroes or risk falling into a new age: The Age of Death.

When you play the Age of Sigmar Roleplaying Game you will be taking on the roles of heroes of the Mortal Realms. Your disparate group are a beacon of hope in the Realms and it is up to you to ensure that light isn’t extinguished. You will drive back the forces of Chaos, Death, and Destruction and help to return life and civilisation to the Realms.

The System


The Age of Sigmar Roleplaying Game uses a D6 dice pool system. You’ll create your dice pool by adding your Attributes together with any Skills you are proficient with. Attributes describe your innate capabilities such as physical prowess, intelligence, and strength of will, while Skills represent your competency and experience in a particular area. Each character has 3 Attributes — Body, Mind, and Soul — and can choose from up to 24 unique Skills.

As well as Attributes and Skills, you will also have Talents. Talents are unique abilities and features that further define what you are capable of, such as spellcasting, aethercraft, or channeling the power of Sigmar into your strikes. When you choose your Archetype (read on for more on Archetypes!) you will have a predetermined list of Skills and Talents to choose from, but as your character grows you will be able to select from a wide array of unique options. This will give you a huge amount of freedom with how you grow and shape your character.

We also have a number of systems within the corebook centred on having your party work together, interacting with the factions of the realms, crafting, pets and mounts, and creating your own spells. We will discuss these and more in future updates.

The Archetypes

Your Archetype is who you are when you begin playing the Age of Sigmar Roleplaying Game. It may be your job, a calling, a military rank, or something a little more esoteric, but whatever it is it represents who you are when you first pick up the dice. Your Archetype is who you are now, but who, or what, you might become has yet to be decided.

Each Archetype presents your Species, your starting Attributes, your Core Skill and a number of other Skills to choose from, your Core Talent and a number of other Talents to choose from, your faction Influence, your starting equipment, and anything else that is important for your character.

The Archetypes presented in the corebook are drawn from some of the most well-known heroes of the Forces of Order. We will share more details and artwork for each Archetype in a future update, but for now we are happy to confirm the Knight-Questor and Knight-Incantor of the Stormcast Eternals, Auric Runesmiter of the Fyreslayers, Aether-Khemist of the Kharadron Overlords, Isharann Tidecaster of the Idoneth Deepkin, Witch Aelf of the Daughters of Khaine, Excelsior Warpriest of the Devoted of Sigmar, Former Freeguild Soldier of the Free Peoples, Kurnoth Hunter of the Sylvaneth, Skink Starpriest of the Seraphon, and the mysterious Realmswalker.

For players who prefer a more free-form approach to character creation, we also present rules for creating characters without Archetypes. Future products will introduce expanded player options, including Archetypes from outside the Forces of Order.

The Setting

The Mortal Realms are almost endless, so packing them into a single book would be impossible. The Age of Sigmar Roleplaying Game presents an overview of each of the Mortal Realms and what life is like for the people who live there. These give players and GMs an idea of what it would be like to adventure in these lands, who they might meet, and the threats they might face. It provides a grounding for you to set your adventure in any Realm you choose.

As well as giving an overview of each of the Realms, the corebook has a chapter dedicated to the lands of the Great Parch in Aqshy, the Realm of Fire. This chapter gives an insight into the daily life of the inhabitants of Aqshy, how they survive, how they trade and who they trade with, and how they have recovered from the events of the Age of Chaos. The great cities of Aqshy are explored, as are the havens of Chaos, Death, and Destruction. This chapter presents all the information a GM will need to run a campaign in The Great Parch.

The Team

To help us create the Age of Sigmar Roleplaying Game we sought out some of the authors who have helped to shape the Mortal Realms into what we know today. David Guymer (Realmslayer, Hamilcar: Champion of the Gods), Josh Reynolds (Soul Wars, Plague Garden), and Clint Werner (The Tainted Heart, Overlords of the Iron Dragon) have all contributed to the Age of Sigmar Roleplaying Game. Their input, insight, and knowledge of the Realms has been immense. These talented folk are some of the people who know the Realms best so to be able to pick their brains has been great. Expect to see more from them as the Age of Sigmar Roleplaying Game grows and we explore more of the Mortal Realms.

What’s Next?

In the coming months we will continue to share more information on the Age of Sigmar Roleplaying Game. Future updates will focus in detail on how Archetypes work, showcase some of our talented artists, explore the complicated relationships of the factions of the Realms, and look into the future of what you can expect from the Age of Sigmar Roleplaying Game. Be sure to keep an eye on our website and social media channels as we announce where you can come meet us, including which events to attend for a chance to be one of the first people in the world to play the Age of Sigmar Roleplaying Game.

Until then, blessings of Sigmar be upon you!
 
Russ Morrissey

Comments


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Henrix

Explorer
Constantly amazed by how this game, and AoS, gets a so much flak for not being old world Warhammer fantasy.

Ridiculous. They are different games.

(And WHFB didn't go under because of AoS. It went because it did not sell enough, in GW terms.)

Criticise a game for being what it is. Not for not being a different game.
There's nothing wrong with Traveller for not being D&D.

AoS is an extremely high fantasy setting set in weird magical planes.
There can be fun in that.
 


Henrix

Explorer
It's probably because it replaced Warhammer Fantasy.
Yeah, it was bad politics of GW to release it at the same time they declared WHFB dead. Though it was dead already.
They ought to have given it a month or three between announcements.
Or keep mum about it being dead, just continue not making models that didn't sell enough for it.

Still not the RPG, though. And there is an old world RPG in print, so why criticise this for not being that?
 

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Vicent Martín Bonet

Guest
Yeah, it was bad politics of GW to release it at the same time they declared WHFB dead. Though it was dead already.
They ought to have given it a month or three between announcements.

They literally gave a four month long period of silence between the old world going kapoom and therefore being destroyed and the age of sigmar announcement/release. And keeping mum is way worse, at least be transparent with your plans, which at least they did.

But, yeah, better leave it here and focus more on the stuff from the rpg.
 
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CapnZapp

Legend
Still not the RPG, though. And there is an old world RPG in print, so why criticise this for not being that?
Again I think I'm having much less trouble with this.

My guess is it has something to do with how any publishing house generally aren't able to give two games individually as much attention as if they only had one.
 


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Vicent Martín Bonet

Guest
Yes, looks like a bad mix of WH40k and WH and probably without the fun and the lore of those old settings, it doesn't help that it also entails the killing of the old world by GW.
This frankly reads less, "I am seeing this" but rather, "I was told almost ad nauseam this and therefore I am projecting this into the image."

There's very little in that image that can really be labelled "40k" with the exception of the woman in hulkbuster armor and raised sword at the forefront and maybe the guy on the baloon if by 40k you mean, "it has a gun capable of firing more than once an hour."

How can you infer that something will "probably" will have no fun nor some lore hooks that are interesting, just from seeing an image? And I'm using the word probably here when I think it's almost "certainly".


And, with all due respect, the whole spiel of "the killing of the old world" can be borderline asinine once you factor in that,at the moment, this company in question is about to release an additional supplement of stuff for the old world. It's still alive and well within those pages.

My guess is it has something to do with how any publishing house generally aren't able to give two games individually as much attention as if they only had one.


Cubicle 7 isn't doing just two games, though. it's also doing the Doctor Who and TOR and the LoTR stuff for DND5e. It's not a really well founded position.
 
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dco

Guest
This frankly reads less, "I am seeing this" but rather, "I was told almost ad nauseam this and therefore I am projecting this into the image."

There's very little in that image that can really be labelled "40k" with the exception of the woman in hulkbuster armor and raised sword at the forefront and maybe the guy on the baloon if by 40k you mean, "it has a gun capable of firing more than once an hour."

How can you infer that something will "probably" will have no fun nor some lore hooks that are interesting, just from seeing an image? And I'm using the word probably here when I think it's almost "certainly".


And, with all due respect, the whole spiel of "the killing of the old world" can be borderline asinine once you factor in that,at the moment, this company in question is about to release an additional supplement of stuff for the old world. It's still alive and well within those pages.
And this reads more about your own projections to discuss my own opinion, so what?
I see some kind of robot with a gun, WH40k has servitors, WH never had those kind of things, the woman nearly looks like a space marine contrary to most knights in WH...
WH40k and the old world have been here for 30 years or more and were released at a time when thing were more fun, I'm certainly sure they have more lore and more funny things at least for me.
Asinine? lol, search "Warhammer the end of times".
 

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Vicent Martín Bonet

Guest
And this reads more about your own projections to discuss my own opinion, so what?
I see some kind of robot with a gun, WH40k has servitors,
Except, that's not a robot? That's one dwarf from the kharadron, which are society of dwarfs that has gone and embraced progress and innovativeness instead of staying with the traditions that brought them into the edge of annhilation.


WH never had those kind of things,
And in truth it did have "robots". While confined within the art, there were quite a few instances of robotic constructs in the empire. Stuff of clogwork, to be specific.

40k and the old world have been here for 30 years or more and were released at a time when thing were more fun, I'm certainly sure they have more lore and more funny things at least for me.
That's some serious goalpost shifting, we've gone from "it has no fun stuff" to "it has more fun stuff" at which point... well, duh? One's a 30 years old setting of 8 editions of main product, 4 editions of rpg. The other is a 3 years old that's barely into the second edition, that has yet to get its 1st edition of rpg.

Asinine? lol, search "Warhammer the end of times".
And yeah, it's asinine. GW has constantly harped about "everything being canon, not necessarily being true." So what if the tabletop wargame got discontinued? That doesn't mean the old world was killed. It still lives within the roleplay. it still lives within the video games that have been licensed and will keep getting greenlit. It still live in the games being played by those that liked 8th, 7th or the previous editions.

But I see I am responding to a fellow spaniard and will desist rather than argue against the wall.
 
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dco

Guest
Except, that's not a robot? That's one of the kharadron, which a society of dwarfs that has gone and embraced progress and innovativeness instead of staying with the traditions that brought them into the edge of annhilation.
Why should I care what it is? It won't change the feeling the art gives me.

And in truth it did. While confined within the art, there were quite a few instances of robotic constructs in the empire. Stuff of clogwork, to be specific.
Good, I'm sure it is super representative of the Old World, we found it in all our adventures and published art/s.

That's some serious goalpost shifting, we've gone from "it has no fun stuff" to "it has more fun stuff" at which point... well, duh? One's a 30 years old setting of 8 editions of main product, 4 editions of rpg. The other is a 3 years old that's barely into the second edition, that has yet to get its 1st edition of rpg.
I said "without the fun and the lore of those old settings", english is not my first language but I don't think it means the same thing as no fun.
Yes, and? It has more or less lore?

And yeah, it's asinine. GW has constantly harped about "everything being canon, not necessarily being true." So what if the tabletop wargame got discontinued? That doesn't mean the old world was killed. It still lives within the roleplay. it still lives within the video games that have been licensed and will keep getting greenlit. It still live in the games being played by those that liked 8th, 7th or the previous editions.

But I see I am responding to a fellow spaniard and will desist rather than argue against the wall.
Whatever, we still play WHFRPG but that's irrelevant, all people I know weren't happy that Age of Sigmar replaced and killed the old setting and why should they? You must be one of the only few that think this attracted more people to the new setting.
Oh, haha, perhaps that's our problem.
 

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Vicent Martín Bonet

Guest
It actually can mean the same thing saying "it lacks the X and Y of Z" as "it has no X and Y", yes.
 



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Vicent Martín Bonet

Guest
Yes.

That's why I barfed and moved on.
Are you marginally up to date with the current state, though? Because the current setting, or the setting about two years ago, are a much, much different beasts from the starter stuff. If you've had, fine by me, otherwise it's a tad jarring.

And that is leaving aside that someone may have feed you misinformation in some measure, which plagued the early days' stuff.
 
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Retreater

Legend
Are you marginally up to date with the current state, though? Because the current setting, or the setting about two years ago, are a much, much different beasts from the starter stuff. If you've had, fine by me, otherwise it's a tad jarring.

And that is leaving aside that someone may have feed you misinformation in some measure, which plagued the early days' stuff.
I can say, as a player of the tabletop battle game, that the Order "good guys" far outweigh Chaos in their competitiveness. Normally "bad guy" armies (like Dark Elves) are now considered good guys.

Plus there's a strong emphasis on monstrous/mega-powered creatures instead of normal fantasy tropes. So instead of wood elves with bows or on horseback, you have armies comprised completely of treemen and woodland spirits. Or instead of militia units of men with swords and halberds, you instead have massive gold-plated men with angel wings. I can understand why some would prefer the old feel of dark fantasy, rooted in literary traditions; compared to the video game MEGA feel of the new edition.

Certainly, I don't know how I feel about an Age of Sigmar RPG with a superhero team consisting of a Sigmarine paladin, Dryad ranger, Dark elf rogue, and Steampunk dwarf engineer. It just seems too gonzo.
 

pogre

Hero
I was hoping for rules similar to WFRP 4E to allow some crossover between the games - Much like the lines of 40K RPG books that FFG cranked out. A new system probably means I am out.
 

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Vicent Martín Bonet

Guest
I can say, as a player of the tabletop battle game, that the Order "good guys" far outweigh Chaos in their competitiveness. Normally "bad guy" armies (like Dark Elves) are now considered good guys.
But they are really not, though? There's a larger percentage of tournament winners in order but it's because they represent a larger spread of factions and the player base. On a faction by faction level, virtually all factions sit at 40-50% winrate, based on tournament data.

The factions that comprise dark elves are *not* good guys. They are part of order, which doesn't mean they are """good""", and most of the time they are so by sheer realpolitik and convenience. And that's without getting into the fact that a Grand Alliance, or its factions in some cases, are balkanized snake pits of opposing interests that just happen to hate the other snake pits a bit more.

Plus there's a strong emphasis on monstrous/mega-powered creatures instead of normal fantasy tropes. So instead of wood elves with bows or on horseback, you have armies comprised completely of treemen and woodland spirits. Or instead of militia units of men with swords and halberds, you instead have massive gold-plated men with angel wings. I can understand why some would prefer the old feel of dark fantasy, rooted in literary traditions; compared to the video game MEGA feel of the new edition.
There's is an emphasis on the more over the top stuff, yeah. Doesn't mean that the regular joe is entirely negated. Both the armies of wood elfs and militiamen that you've used as an example exist in the setting and *have* quite a bit of literature, funnily enough. The stories about prince maesa (like Hunger fiend, the autumn prince and so on) and... well, the free peoples have a smattering of series, like callis and toll, or the crew from spear of shadows. The latter I think would make a good template for a party, really.

Certainly, I don't know how I feel about an Age of Sigmar RPG with a superhero team consisting of a Sigmarine paladin, Dryad ranger, Dark elf rogue, and Steampunk dwarf engineer. It just seems too gonzo.
Can I point the mild hilarity of you arguing about something being too gonzo yet glossing over the standard human in the party? The human priest with the book held in front of him? And that the "dark elf" you're refering to is not a druchii, nor would fit within the categories of dark elves?

And that's without getting into the fact that an elf *wizard*, a dwarf with technological aptitude and two humans, priest and paladin, are basically staples of anything fantasy. I mean, you are *quite* more into historical and VERY regular dudes, I guess?

I was hoping for rules similar to WFRP 4E to allow some crossover between the games - Much like the lines of 40K RPG books that FFG cranked out. A new system probably means I am out.
They explicidly stated they would be entirely separated rulesets from day one, sorry.
 
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Retreater

Legend
But they are really not, though? There's a larger percentage of tournament winners in order but it's because they represent a larger spread of factions and the player base. On a faction by faction level, virtually all factions sit at 40-50% winrate, based on tournament data.

The factions that comprise dark elves are *not* good guys. They are part of order, which doesn't mean they are """good""", and most of the time they are so by sheer realpolitik and convenience. And that's without getting into the fact that a Grand Alliance, or its factions in some cases, are balkanized snake pits of opposing interests that just happen to hate the other snake pits a bit more.



There's is an emphasis on the more over the top stuff, yeah. Doesn't mean that the regular joe is entirely negated. Both the armies of wood elfs and militiamen that you've used as an example exist in the setting and *have* quite a bit of literature, funnily enough. The stories about prince maesa (like Hunger fiend, the autumn prince and so on) and... well, the free peoples have a smattering of series, like callis and toll, or the crew from spear of shadows. The latter I think would make a good template for a party, really.



Can I point the mild hilarity of you arguing about something being too gonzo yet glossing over the standard human in the party? The human priest with the book held in front of him? And that the "dark elf" you're refering to is not a druchii, nor would fit within the categories of dark elves?

And that's without getting into the fact that an elf *wizard*, a dwarf with technological aptitude and two humans, priest and paladin, are basically staples of anything fantasy. I mean, you are *quite* more into historical and VERY regular dudes, I guess?



They explicidly stated they would be entirely separated rulesets from day one, sorry.
I think that dark elves with their cauldrons of blood, snake sorcerers, etc, aligning with angels of order and fighting in the literal same armies is pretty ridiculous actually. Maybe that's just me though.
I've just been studying what's out there for AoS 2e in hopes of getting a second army. The lion's share of factions with available models, updated rules, and the best performing ones are Order alliance. And they're quite over the top (compared to most fantasy). Undead elves riding on flying sea turtles (who are also the good guys) is another example.
And the hilarity of my envisioning the Sigmar party was based on my knowledge of the product line, not the book's artwork (which I haven't assessed to be able to criticize). Instead I'm just guessing what a party would be like.
 

MonsterEnvy

Adventurer
I think that dark elves with their cauldrons of blood, snake sorcerers, etc, aligning with angels of order and fighting in the literal same armies is pretty ridiculous actually. Maybe that's just me though.
I've just been studying what's out there for AoS 2e in hopes of getting a second army. The lion's share of factions with available models, updated rules, and the best performing ones are Order alliance. And they're quite over the top (compared to most fantasy). Undead elves riding on flying sea turtles (who are also the good guys) is another example.
And the hilarity of my envisioning the Sigmar party was based on my knowledge of the product line, not the book's artwork (which I haven't assessed to be able to criticize). Instead I'm just guessing what a party would be like.
They don't normally fight in the same armies. Also a short story made it clear what the Forces of Order opinions on the Daughters of Khaine were. (Also I would not put the Stormcast on the levels of Angels as despite the superpowers they are still a largely just people, flaws and all under the fancy armor.)

https://malignportents.com/story/the-great-and-the-good/

Added on another story made it clear they have treacherous intentions and Morathi fully intends to betray Order.

The Idoneth are not Undead. They are just creepy looking. (Also the Sea Turtles don't fly, the Idoneth use magic to create a magical sea where they fight so they can fight the same on land as they would in the water.)

The most high performing armies are a mix, Order is for sure not dominant.
 
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