D&D General Best D&D Novels

You favorite D&D book

  • Prism Pentad

    Votes: 2 4.3%
  • Dragonlance Chronicles

    Votes: 18 39.1%
  • Dragonlance Legends

    Votes: 8 17.4%
  • Moonshae Trilogy

    Votes: 1 2.2%
  • Dark Elf Trilogy

    Votes: 12 26.1%
  • Icewind Dale Trilogy

    Votes: 10 21.7%
  • Cleric Quintet

    Votes: 4 8.7%
  • I, Strahd

    Votes: 7 15.2%
  • Saga of the Old Cities (Gord the Rogue)

    Votes: 3 6.5%
  • Misc Harpers (Ring of Winter, Song of Ice, etc)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Finder's Stone (Azure Bonds, etc)

    Votes: 5 10.9%
  • Knight of the Black Rose

    Votes: 4 8.7%
  • Vox Machina

    Votes: 2 4.3%
  • Cormyr Saga

    Votes: 1 2.2%
  • Spellfire

    Votes: 1 2.2%
  • Avatar Series (Shadowdale, Waterdeep, etc)

    Votes: 1 2.2%
  • Module Novels (White Plume Mountain, Keep on the Borderlands, etc)

    Votes: 5 10.9%
  • Songs and Swords series

    Votes: 1 2.2%
  • Neverwinter Saga

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Other

    Votes: 8 17.4%


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Alzrius

The EN World kitten
For me, the two D&D novels that I keep coming back to – flipping open when I have a few free minutes to re-read favorite passages – are James Lowder's Knight of the Black Rose and Gene DeWeese's King of the Dead, both classic Ravenloft novels. There's just something about those two characters, and the way they both ultimately damn themselves, that I find markedly appealing.
 

p_johnston

Explorer
I often see… ire? Online for all things Drizzt, but I’ve had to have read Honeland-Sojourn at least 3-4 times since I discovered them in middle school.
So I really enjoyed the early Drizzt works. I think the Dark Elf trilogy are all very good books, I think the Icewind Dale trilogy ranges from good to ok depending on the book, and I sporadically enjoyed some of the later books. That being said there are about 40 books about him and maybe 10 of them are actually good (with a heavy weighting towards the early books).
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
A lot of votes for the various Drizzt novels, but hardly any for the Cleric Quintet. If you've enjoyed the Drizzt books, I highly suggest the Quintet. It's some of Salvatore's better writing IMO. Probably because he wasn't forced to write about a Mary Sue character that fans demanded.
 

p_johnston

Explorer
A lot of votes for the various Drizzt novels, but hardly any for the Cleric Quintet. If you've enjoyed the Drizzt books, I highly suggest the Quintet. It's some of Salvatore's better writing IMO. Probably because he wasn't forced to write about a Mary Sue character that fans demanded.
I think I was one of the only other people that voted for it and your right it's really good. Funnily enough reading that is what cemented my opinion that Salvatore is a legitimately good author when he's not trying to write a series into infinity. A lot of his non forgotten realms stuff is also really good and refreshing.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Dark Sun was probably the first thing I ever became curmudgeonly about. They created this setting with all these intriguing plot seeds DMs could do all sorts of things with, then in the first licensed series meant to introduce the setting to people they destroyed a huge chunk of them. Killing Kalak off in the first book was fine, that changed the setting in a way that made it more interesting for PCs, but by the end they'd revealed WAY too much initially-mysterious backstory, killed off "The" Dragon and a few too many other key characters, altered the political situation beyond recognition (rather than just throwing a single interesting spanner in it as the first book did), shown us quite a bit of what lay outside the Tablelands (only a little of which was all that interesting)... I would have been much happier if they'd ended that series after a lot less than five books.

I don't agree that they were that good of books, either. The first two or three were very enjoyable for what they are, but the last one in particular I didn't like at all. Of course, it's hard to view them now as I would have at the time, with so much hindsight on both how the Prism Pentad itself ended and Denning's later atrocities against the Star Wars expanded universe. (Star by Star is probably the best piece of fiction he ever wrote, though it's damning with faint praise to some extent - it's post-NJO that my objections start in earnest.) That no doubt colours my recollections of his earlier books.

Star by Star was one of the better NJO books.

Probably because that plotline was crap and badly written/boring.
 

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