log in or register to remove this ad

 

5E Best MultiClass character build? Why?

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I usually avoid Multi-classing because I'm lazy (feel free to argue that I'm not, I'm ok with that :)); and I also don't usually have an in-game reason to multi-class.
But maybe some folks' builds will inspire me to MC. I certainly hope so.

So, what is your "best" multi-class character build?

YOU get to define what Best means to you.
Best means the superlative. There can be only ONE Best. So please limit yourself to one, if you can. If not, well, that's ok too - cause I just want inspiration.

Incidentally, I'm also really fascinated by when you might decide to multi-class and for what reason. Another reason I'm resistant to MClassing is because when I'm 9th going on 10th, I say to myself "really? 16,000xp to be a FIRST level anything? Nah..." But now we're moving to milestone, and so this won't be so much a thing. So if you're like I take 3 levels of fighter, then take 1 level of Rogue to get Sneak Attack, then 2 levels of Warlock to do some other cool thing - that would be great.

Feel free to take it all the way through 20 levels, or through 10 (most typical games); or through the first Multi-class, or whatever you want. No real rules here. I'm just looking forward to hearing the what, why, when of your Ideal MC character.

(Oh yeah one rule: 5e WotC only classes and sub-classes please, including Unearthed A. My GM allows all of those but not 3rd party stuff. But I guess if you have a super wicked hype build with a 3rd party book, maybe I can buy him a case of beer and he'll let me use that too...)
 

log in or register to remove this ad

Mort

Hero
Supporter
What's your stat generation method? It matters more with multi-classing as MAD may or may not be a thing with multi-classing depending on how stats are generated.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
What's your stat generation method? It matters more with multi-classing as MAD may or may not be a thing with multi-classing depending on how stats are generated.
Huh. Hadn't thought of that. I use points buy, although my GM allows rolling. I also use the default HP increase, as opposed to rolling. I'm just not convinced that luck will always be on my side (actually, as a borderline pessimist, I'm pretty sure the luck will NOT be on my side)
 

Mort

Hero
Supporter
Best also depends on what you want to be best at. Healing, Tanking, skills?

One of the "best" martial builds out there is the paladin/hexplade.

Pros:
Much better range capability than a straight paladin (paladins are usually melee beasts but lousy at range)

Can focus on Charisma for everything resolving one of the paladin's biggest issues (MAD) - Also means early ASIs can go to Charisma to get it up fast.

Access to the shield spell (so can have boost to an AC of 25-26 without any magic 27-28 if you really need it)
Access to the booming blade cantrip - great for a tanking build

Crit on 19-20, opening up all sorts of possibilities (oath of vengeance, elven accuracy, polearm master, for ridiculous crit fishing - which you then use smite)

Only need 1 level of hexblade to unlock the good benefits

probably more that I'm missing

Cons:
Slightly less HPs (though not much, 1 level of hexblade is 1 less HP than a level of paladin)

Delayed access to paladin abilities (biggest one would be the 6th level aura, the paladin biggie )

Delayed access to ASI or feat (by at least 1 level)

Less lay on hands (5 HP loss per hexbalde level, but you only really need 1)

If your DM is a RP stickler you now have an oath and a patron to deal with

Can be considered "cheesy" because it's such a common MC go-to.

As for progression - 1. Paladin 2. Hexblade 3+ paladin unless you feel like throwing in another level of hexblade (then go to 3 eventually for some spell and invocation benefits.
 

Eloquent bard with single-level dip in order cleric it's probably the best way to capitalize on somebody else's high damage output. Where do you add that means you can use tandem tactics as well.
 

the Jester

Legend
Whatever is the most fun for you is the best. Since I have played far less 5e than I have dmed, I only have one experience with multiclassing as a pc so far- and that's a cleric/fighter/wizard, one level in each so far. I'm torn as to what to take when next I level. Do I want action surge, or max damage on thunder as a channel divinity and second level slots, or a wizard subclass and second level slots? That's a tougher choice that I had thought it would be.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
I don’t know about it being “the best multiclass build,” but taking your first level in Fighter is amazing for a Bladesinger wizard. You get higher starting HP, Second Wind, a fighting style (Dueling if you want to use a rapier and keep one hand free, defense if you want to pump your AC as high as humanly possible, or dual-wielding if you want to maximize your DPR), and most crucially, proficiency in Con saves. All at the low cost of delaying your Wizard progression by one level, and if you go all the way to 20th level, missing your capstone. Well worth it in my opinion.
 


Laurefindel

Adventurer
Paladin/sorcerer/warlock synergize well in any permutation, partly because they all share the same casting stat, but also (In case of Paladin multiclass) because they fuel the Paladin smites, with several other benefits.

dragon (electricity) or storm sorcerer goes well with tempest cleric. You’ll keep to low level spells, but they will be devastating upcast and boosted.

barbarian and fighter multiclass well, even if you delay your extra attack. A barbarian that can self heal, action surge, and get a fighting style? Yes please! Damage resistance and damage bonus on your fighter? Don’t mind if I do!

barbarian (totem or berserker) goes well with moon Druid for a beorn-like skinchanger.

Ultimately, the advantage of multiclassing is to take advantage of the fact that classes are “front loaded“ to combine synergetic benefits. The cons are always not progressing as fast in your primary class
 

Laurefindel

Adventurer
Other combination I like:

swashbuckler rogue/sword bard. You are a selfish bard hogging your own inspirations and concentration spells to fully embrace the rogue in you.

4-elements monk/fiend warlock. Not a popular one, but i like it nonetheless. Each class quickly run out of resources, but together they hold longer and have melee/ranged fallback options. Super MAD; play this when you rolled incredibly well of a straight series of 13s and 14s.

berserker barbarian/fey warlock. Scare them first or cast armor of agathis and rage; you can’t get your bonus action attack on round 1 anyway.
 

dnd4vr

The Smurfiest Wizard Ever!
Human variant Rogue (Scout) 13/ Bard (Lore) 6/ Cleric (Knowledge) 1.
  • You have proficiency in All skills, so Reliable Talent will apply to every ability (skill) check you make.
  • You have expertise in 11 of the 18 skills (4 rogue + 2 scout + 2 knowledge cleric + 2 bard + 1 prodigy), or choose it in thieves' tools, kits, etc., so pick most of the things you want to be AWESOME at with +12 just from expertise/ proficiency alone! Nothing like a lot of minimum 22 ability (skill) checks. ;)
  • You have 4th level spell slots for upcasting Cleric or Bard spells.
  • You have respectable sneak attack damage at 6d6.
  • You have 6 ASI/feats (Human, Rogue 4, 8, 10, 12, Bard 4) for bumping ability scores and/or choosing your favorite feats.

If you want darkvision, Half-Elf with two skills is a good choice for race as well.
You can also drop the 13th level in rogue to pick up 4th level bard spells.

In general, lots of options with this build and you can get proficiency in all skills by level 7 if you want.

So, ultimate skill monkey build IMO.
 

Warpiglet-7

Explorer
Cleric warlock with variant human.

get some armor, smite, have some extra spells...

I have a war cleric 1, celestial patron bladelock 7. Potent. Plate, pole arm master means more chances to smite. I have landed a bunch and some as crits...

great combo.
 
Last edited:

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
Human variant Rogue (Scout) 13/ Bard (Lore) 6/ Cleric (Knowledge) 1.
  • You have proficiency in All skills, so Reliable Talent will apply to every ability (skill) check you make.
  • You have expertise in 11 of the 18 skills (4 rogue + 2 scout + 2 knowledge cleric + 2 bard + 1 prodigy), or choose it in thieves' tools, kits, etc., so pick most of the things you want to be AWESOME at with +12 just from expertise/ proficiency alone! Nothing like a lot of minimum 22 ability (skill) checks. ;)
  • You have 4th level spell slots for upcasting Cleric or Bard spells.
  • You have respectable sneak attack damage at 6d6.
  • You have 6 ASI/feats (Human, Rogue 4, 8, 10, 12, Bard 4) for bumping ability scores and/or choosing your favorite feats.

If you want darkvision, Half-Elf with two skills is a good choice for race as well.
You can also drop the 13th level in rogue to pick up 4th level bard spells.

In general, lots of options with this build and you can get proficiency in all skills by level 7 if you want.

So, ultimate skill monkey build IMO.
Also Jack of All Trades will give you half your proficiency bonus on any ability checks to which no skill applies. Such as generic strength checks to break stuff, checks with tool proficiencies, and Initiative.
 

Campbell

Legend
Right now I'm playing an Eladrin Swashbuckler/Draconic Sorcerer. It's been working out very well. Booming Blade and Green Flame pair very well with Rogues because they do not have extra attacks.

The build really excels at delivering damage where it's needed due to its high mobility and has strong nova potential. It is decently squishy, but Shield helps a lot

You are basically Nightcrawler.
 


Mort

Hero
Supporter
Gloom Stalker Ranger 5 (Archery Style), Rogue Assassin 1-15. Wood Elf, with Elven Accuracy.

What I've always wanted to play is a Shadow Monk/Rogue (not sure of subclass), but somehow have never gotten around to it.
If the DM is even slightly permissive with opportunity for assassinate - this gets nasty very fast!
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
My current favorite is a Rogue Swashbuckler/Wizard Bladesinger, though an Artificer Battlesmith could sub in for the Rogue and have even more synergy.

I'm also fond of Monk multiclass builds, especially a Shadow Monk/Gloomstalker Ranger, any combination of Open Hand or Drunken Master Monk or Kensei Monk with Battlemaster Fighter or Swashbuckler Rogue, and Monk (any) with Moon Druid for a dope as hell spin kicking wolf or like a literal crane that stun-punches people.

Also, eventually you can Call Lightning, turn into a decent-hp critter, and go punch the crap outta stuff.

Paladin/Rogue is really fun. Start rogue, because skills are more important than better armor and rapier is the only weapon you need, and split levels pretty evenly, and have a ball. Vengeance paladin probably gets the most out of this pairing, but IME Ancients is the most fun of the paladin oaths. Obviously you want swashbuckler. High Dex, high Cha, always go high in the order, never get locked down, do big crits, have all the skills. What's not to like?
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Best also depends on what you want to be best at. Healing, Tanking, skills?
I'll leave it to you guys to tell me what "Best" means to you. For me, I don't care, I just want cool MC characters.

One of the "best" martial builds out there is the paladin/hexplade.

Pros:
Much better range capability than a straight paladin (paladins are usually melee beasts but lousy at range)

Can focus on Charisma for everything resolving one of the paladin's biggest issues (MAD) - Also means early ASIs can go to Charisma to get it up fast.

Access to the shield spell (so can have boost to an AC of 25-26 without any magic 27-28 if you really need it)
Access to the booming blade cantrip - great for a tanking build

Crit on 19-20, opening up all sorts of possibilities (oath of vengeance, elven accuracy, polearm master, for ridiculous crit fishing - which you then use smite)

Only need 1 level of hexblade to unlock the good benefits

probably more that I'm missing

Cons:
Slightly less HPs (though not much, 1 level of hexblade is 1 less HP than a level of paladin)

Delayed access to paladin abilities (biggest one would be the 6th level aura, the paladin biggie )

Delayed access to ASI or feat (by at least 1 level)

Less lay on hands (5 HP loss per hexbalde level, but you only really need 1)

If your DM is a RP stickler you now have an oath and a patron to deal with

Can be considered "cheesy" because it's such a common MC go-to.

As for progression - 1. Paladin 2. Hexblade 3+ paladin unless you feel like throwing in another level of hexblade (then go to 3 eventually for some spell and invocation benefits.
Oh yes, I have heard of Paladin Hexlock combo. Sounds nasty. And you can be the party face also, so you get to participate in social situations as well... Nice!
 
Last edited:

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Eloquent bard with single-level dip in order cleric it's probably the best way to capitalize on somebody else's high damage output. Where do you add that means you can use tandem tactics as well.
I googled the phrase "tandem tactics" as I am unfamiliar with it and it gave me this thread lol. Can you explain the phrase?
 
Last edited:

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Whatever is the most fun for you is the best.
Yes. So far I have found single classes the most fun for me. I'm ready to branch out, and really have no idea what to do first. I don't play enough to try a whole bunch of different characters. Nor do I want to do a ton of research. So I'm looking to my expanded "friend" group here on EnWorld for recs.
 

COMING SOON: 5 Plug-In Settlements for your 5E Game

Advertisement2

Advertisement4

Top