5E Best Name For A “Leader” Class?

Best name?

  • Herald

    Votes: 7 7.1%
  • Banneret

    Votes: 3 3.0%
  • Captain

    Votes: 17 17.2%
  • Warlord

    Votes: 25 25.3%
  • Marshal

    Votes: 37 37.4%
  • Mark

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Other - let us know!

    Votes: 12 12.1%
  • Commander

    Votes: 18 18.2%
  • Warden

    Votes: 8 8.1%
  • Sentinel

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    99

Hriston

Adventurer
Well, a power that has a requirement like "the ally must be able to hear & understand you" might be literally a command, as a name like "Commander" might imply, or it might be a warning, pointing out an opportunity, offering advice, giving encouragement, or coordinating a pre-arranged or oft-used battle plan/trick/maneuver. Without such a restriction, a maneuver that granted an ally an attack or bonus might also/instead involve creating an opening by binding then enemy's weapon or shield and/or distracting it.
So widening the concept beyond “commander” to something more like “adviser” or someone who provides other types of battlefield support might be in order?
 
So widening the concept beyond “commander” to something more like “adviser” or someone who provides other types of battlefield support might be in order?
"Support" probably shouldn't be taken too literally, not anymore than "leader" or "heal-bot." *














* not say'n there's anything wrong with Warforged taking the Healer feat...
 

Hriston

Adventurer
"Support" probably shouldn't be taken too literally, not anymore than "leader" or "heal-bot." *














* not say'n there's anything wrong with Warforged taking the Healer feat...
Well, by “battlefield support”, I meant the types of maneuvers you were describing, playing Robin to someone else’s Batman or however you would characterize them.
 
I know there's some cognitive dissonance with what amounts to calling the class Batman when Robin is what it does, but I really don't see the profit in going this deep into the tank about it. Pick a cool name and roll with it. I don't particularly care for the name Warlord personally, but the name of the class isn't why I'd play it. If I were picking I'd have a little more Batman in the mix anyway, but I just don't see that the name is worth this much bother. However, don't let my opinion ruin your fun, as your were gentlemen.
 
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Garthanos

Arcadian Knight
Robin as a teen did team inspiration to be certain
I know there's some cognitive dissonance with what amounts to calling the class Batman when Robin is what it does, but I really don't see the profit in going this deep into the tank about it. Pick a cool name and roll with it. I don't particularly care for the name Warlord personally, but the name of the class isn't why I'd play it. If I were picking I'd have a little more Batman in the mix anyway, but I just see that the name is worth this much bother. However, don't let my opinion ruin your fun, as your were gentlemen.
 
Well, by “battlefield support”, I meant the types of maneuvers you were describing, playing Robin to someone else’s Batman or however you would characterize them.
Yeah, I'm just paranoid at this point.... ;)

It's helpful to have reasonably intuitive labels in a discussion. And Warlord is no more unintuitive for what it does than Paladin or Cleric - indeed most D&D classes less generic than "Fighter"* - were when they were new, and less problematic than the implications of Cleric ("if you don't worship my deity, no healing for you!") or Thief ("of course I'm going to steal from my own party, I'm just playing my thief character!") were at that time (and for years and years afterwards). Any discussion of changing the name perforce uses the name, to avoid confusion. Witness the confusion in this thread.







* and even that implied boxer to some folks in the 70s.
 
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I still like Tactician. It's not sexy though. Going in a different direction Augur or some similarly prophetic name might avoid some of the connotations people are looking to avoid.
 

Hurin88

Explorer
Well, a power that has a requirement like "the ally must be able to hear & understand you" might be literally a command, as a name like "Commander" might imply, or it might be a warning, pointing out an opportunity, offering advice, giving encouragement, or coordinating a pre-arranged or oft-used battle plan/trick/maneuver. Without such a restriction, a maneuver that granted an ally an attack or bonus might also/instead involve creating an opening by binding then enemy's weapon or shield and/or distracting it.
Yes, that's a better way of putting it than formal 'commands', as I did.

Powers like Wolf Pack Tactics enabled the Warlord's ally to take some free movement to get into better position. Is this a command? Not in the formal sense of an order that must be obeyed or the target will be disciplined. You could see it more as advice: the Warlord advising, 'Try to flank!' to his ally. And of course the crucial part is that the ally gets to choose whether to move or not. So it isn't really an order in a formal sense.

Many of the Warlord's powers are like this. Even taking the healing the Warlord gave out was largely optional: Inspiring Word just says the target 'can' spend a healing surge and get extra healing. He doesn't have to.

So yes: tactical advice; suggestions; enabling; pointing out openings in the enemy formation and weaknesses in the enemy defenses; offering words of encouragement. These are the sorts of things the Warlord excelled at, and there is no reason to see them strictly as commands.
 
This came up in another thread, and thought it'd be interesting, here. A Google Image search for the names leading this poll.

Marshal:
1579641091414.png


Warlord:
1579641202523.png


Commander:
1579642521650.png

Captain:
1579641632538.png

Captain America! cool, sometimes used as an example of a Warlord, so there you go.
But I love the Captain Obvious made the first page. I can picture him saying "If you want a good name for a Walord, how about Warlord." "Thank you, Captain Obvious."
 
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Lanefan

Victoria Rules
Those Google images are hardly a fair comparison. Warlord has already (and relatively recently) been used as a D&D class name where none of the others have, 1e level titles notwithstanding, thus it's far more likely you're going to find fantasy-based images for Warlord than any of the rest.

Had the 4e class been called Marshal, say, or Captain, then it'd be that name that pulled the fantasy images while Warlord would pull images of various historical dictators and despots.

Try again.
 

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