log in or register to remove this ad

 

Best Threequel

Die Hard with a Vengeance.

Great movie, although I wish they had reworked the ending to take place in New York, since that was a big part of what made it so good. A life-falling-apart John McClane, back in his old hometown & long-removed from being the shining hero with a happy ending in sunny Los Angeles, having to solve "Simon Says" puzzles while hungover, being repeatedly trolled by a vengeful terrorist who makes McClane crisscross the cramped confines of bustling NYC in impossible time limits, butting heads with but needing the help of one very annoyed "Hey" Zeus Carver.

The alternate ending is an interesting "what if" as well, but I don't think the movie did enough to build towards that.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

turnip_farmer

Adventurer
It's also the one where Scotty is telling the 80s engineers about transparent aluminum. Which, by the way, is now a real thing as well. Star Trek: right after The Simpsons when it comes to predictions lol
But that's also the comedy scene where Scotty is one minute talking to a mouse because he doesn't understand 20th century technology; and then the next minute coding in Basic. That bothered me.
 

aco175

Legend
I'll admit that I saw this, but not sure on if there is the best one. I did hear that this series was being remade as well.

1613763867753.png
 

embee

Lawyer by day. Rules lawyer by night.
I love all three, but to me Fellowship of the Ring is the one that knocked it out of the park. The others are good, maybe even great, just not amazing.
For me, FOTR is to TTT as The Godfather: Part I is to The Godfather: Part II.

TTT is a bit more epic in scale. Also, the Extended Version contains a really potent scene in the Dead Marshes that adds a bit more pathos to Gollum.
 

But that's also the comedy scene where Scotty is one minute talking to a mouse because he doesn't understand 20th century technology; and then the next minute coding in Basic. That bothered me.

Honestly, I've seen this sort of thing multiple times in my life now.

In college, the lab upgraded from Windows 2000 to to XP with no notice (my home box ran ME). I legitimately had to ask a Computer Science professor for help navigating the Start Menu, and seconds later was working on a C++ assignment.

My kids learned computers on iPad before anything else. I had to show them how to use a trackball on a PC. Seconds later, they're building a world in Minecraft.
 

MarkB

Legend
Honestly, I've seen this sort of thing multiple times in my life now.

In college, the lab upgraded from Windows 2000 to to XP with no notice (my hoe box ran ME). I legitimately had to ask a Computer Science professor for help navigating the Start Menu, and seconds later was working on a C++ assignment.

My kids learned computers on iPad before anything else. I had to show them how to use a trackball on a PC. Seconds later, they're building a world in Minecraft.
I never saw it as him not understanding it, so much as having to calibrate his expectations down far enough.
 


turnip_farmer

Adventurer
I never saw it as him not understanding it, so much as having to calibrate his expectations down far enough.
It's ridiculous. There is absolutely no reasonable way he would know how to use a programming language that nobody had used for three centuries before his birth. If you sat down with someone in the palaeolthic, would the fact that you were a systems engineer in the 21st century mean that you would be an expert at knapping flint? No. You would be worse at knapping flint than the children. Every 21st engineer would be bad at knapping flint. And every 24th century engineer would be bad at 20th century programming languages they had never practiced with.
 

The Godfather is a series that I always just bounce off of. But I know enough to get the analogy :)

The new scenes in the Extended Editions are a mixed bag - sometimes it throws the pacing off, sometimes it falls flat, and sometimes you can't understand why in the world they cut the scene in the first place.

For me, FOTR is to TTT as The Godfather: Part I is to The Godfather: Part II.

TTT is a bit more epic in scale. Also, the Extended Version contains a really potent scene in the Dead Marshes that adds a bit more pathos to Gollum.
 

TwoSix

Unserious gamer
It's ridiculous. There is absolutely no reasonable way he would know how to use a programming language that nobody had used for three centuries before his birth. If you sat down with someone in the palaeolthic, would the fact that you were a systems engineer in the 21st century mean that you would be an expert at knapping flint? No. You would be worse at knapping flint than the children. Every 21st engineer would be bad at knapping flint. And every 24th century engineer would be bad at 20th century programming languages they had never practiced with.
Realistically, no one from the 24th century would need to know how to do syntax-based programming at all; they would give natural language directives and AIs would translate that into workable code.
 

turnip_farmer

Adventurer
Realistically, no one from the 24th century would need to know how to do syntax-based programming at all; they would give natural language directives and AIs would translate that into workable code.
Exactly. Which is what they do in Star Trek. And is what Scotty tries to do at first in 1986. But when that fails he's suddenly a programming whiz.
 


embee

Lawyer by day. Rules lawyer by night.
Exactly. Which is what they do in Star Trek. And is what Scotty tries to do at first in 1986. But when that fails he's suddenly a programming whiz.
Ahhh... But let's not forget who we're talking about.

Montgomery Scott, engineer extraordinaire.

When something needs to be fixed, Scotty unfailingly figures out the fix in record time. I mean, he'll lie to you about how much time he needs first (to make himself look like a miracle worker) but he'll also figure it out quicker than anyone else.

Even Georgie LaForge would take an agonizingly long time to figure out how to couple a tachyon emitter to the main deflector dish to try to reverse the polarity of the phase shift anomaly. In that amount of time, Scotty would have been able to reroute power from the phaser emitters through the port nacelle to give a crippled Constitution-class vessel better than 3/4 impulse after the dilithium reserves are depleted. It willna be pretty, Captain, but it should git ye where ye need t'go. He kin do it in an hour, but since ye need it in fifteen, he'll do it fer ye in ten.

Could his nephew Peter Preston have done that? No. I mean, obviously we'll never know, as Khan killed him, but Preston was more the loyal and dutiful engineer than the whiz-bang engineer like his uncle.

So figuring out how to code at the level of a Stanford graduate circa 1986 should present no significant problems.
 

turnip_farmer

Adventurer
Star Trek isn't remotely realistic, is all I'm saying. :)

Ahhh... But let's not forget who we're talking about.

Montgomery Scott, engineer extraordinaire.

But it's the contrast in that scene that gets me. The joke about 'future guy doesn't understand our technology' immediately followed by the future guy acing our technology.

You could have had him look at a diagram or a production centre and tell them 'you want to increase the kiflidium content in the base material and inject an izwot-jinjulium alloy to the mix at this stage here'; and the boss would be all 'throw out this lunatic' and then some engineer in the back would go 'hang on, sir! I think this might be a breakthough!'

That's the only change required to make this the best Star Trek film till First Contact.
 

MarkB

Legend
Ahhh... But let's not forget who we're talking about.

Montgomery Scott, engineer extraordinaire.

When something needs to be fixed, Scotty unfailingly figures out the fix in record time. I mean, he'll lie to you about how much time he needs first (to make himself look like a miracle worker) but he'll also figure it out quicker than anyone else.

Even Georgie LaForge would take an agonizingly long time to figure out how to couple a tachyon emitter to the main deflector dish to try to reverse the polarity of the phase shift anomaly. In that amount of time, Scotty would have been able to reroute power from the phaser emitters through the port nacelle to give a crippled Constitution-class vessel better than 3/4 impulse after the dilithium reserves are depleted. It willna be pretty, Captain, but it should git ye where ye need t'go. He kin do it in an hour, but since ye need it in fifteen, he'll do it fer ye in ten.

Could his nephew Peter Preston have done that? No. I mean, obviously we'll never know, as Khan killed him, but Preston was more the loyal and dutiful engineer than the whiz-bang engineer like his uncle.

So figuring out how to code at the level of a Stanford graduate circa 1986 should present no significant problems.
Yeah, this is a guy who reads technical manuals for fun, in his spare time. If anyone has a good grip of programming and engineering history, it's him.
 

embee

Lawyer by day. Rules lawyer by night.
But it's the contrast in that scene that gets me. The joke about 'future guy doesn't understand our technology' immediately followed by the future guy acing our technology.

You could have had him look at a diagram or a production centre and tell them 'you want to increase the kiflidium content in the base material and inject an izwot-jinjulium alloy to the mix at this stage here'; and the boss would be all 'throw out this lunatic' and then some engineer in the back would go 'hang on, sir! I think this might be a breakthough!'

That's the only change required to make this the best Star Trek film till First Contact.
He understands it. He then derisively calls it quaint.
 



But it's the contrast in that scene that gets me. The joke about 'future guy doesn't understand our technology' immediately followed by the future guy acing our technology.

You could have had him look at a diagram or a production centre and tell them 'you want to increase the kiflidium content in the base material and inject an izwot-jinjulium alloy to the mix at this stage here'; and the boss would be all 'throw out this lunatic' and then some engineer in the back would go 'hang on, sir! I think this might be a breakthough!'

But that ...is... the joke.
 


An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top