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By Crom! Modiphius is Making a New CONAN RPG

Modiphius Entertainment will be producing the newest Conan roleplaying game. Titled Robert E. Howard’s CONAN Adventures In An Age Undreamed Of, the game is planned for an August 2015 launch, and will focus on Howard's original stories using the 2d20 game system, the cinematic roleplaying rules devised by Jay Little (Star Wars: Edge of the Empire) for Mutant Chronicles. "Modiphius is already working on the roleplaying corebook for Robert E. Howard’s CONAN Adventures In An Age Undreamed Of to be released this Fall. A Kickstarter is planned for the summer to fund a larger range of roleplaying supplements, campaigns, and accessories to follow the core book."

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They've got quite a team assembled: Timothy Brown (designer of the Dark Sun setting), Robert E. Howard scholar and essayist Jeffrey Shanks, Jason Durall (Basic Roleplaying, Serenity, The Laundry), and Chris Lites (Paizo, Savage Worlds, Omni, Slate). Shanks, the HOward cholar, will approve all material and ensure it remains true to the spirit of the original texts. This is, of course, not Conan's first outing as an RPG. There were Conan D&D adventures in the 1980s (when the Schwarzenengger movies were very popular), and a Conan RPG by TSR in 1985; there's been a GURPS Conan, and Mongoose Publishing's successful Conan RPG line with numerous editions and supplements. Conan first appeared in the pulp fiction magazine Weird Tales in 1932.

More info here.
 
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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

Water Bob

Adventurer
You mention 5E. Now, there's a rule set that looks like its done "right" to me. I haven't played it, or even dug into it, but I like much of what I see.

I'd be extremely happy with the new Conan game went with 5E D&D rules, or at least produced a 5E compatible version. That would be the version I would buy.

I'm dreaming to think they'd use D6 for the new Conan game, but if they did, I'd be doing backflips that could be seen from the moon.
 

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JeffB

Legend
I think Mongoose's d20 3.5 Conan RPG is fantastic. It was the game that brought me to d20 (I came in late, avoiding most of the 3E era because of the crunch and learning curve), and now that I've seen other d20 system, the Mongoose d20 Conan game is the best version of d20 that I've seen ever printed (including D&D 3/3.5E and Pathfinder). It's a fantastic version of the rules.

Of course, I do like simulation.

And...I like rules-lite, too. I enjoy both styles of gaming. They both have their selling points.

I think a great rules-lite system for a new Conan game would be the D6 system, originally used for WEG's Star Wars and Indiana Jones games. It is quick and easy to use. Easy to teach. If you like simulation and crunch, the game can be tuned that way. If you just want a swashbuckling, fly by the seat of your pants type of game, then D6 can do that too.

D6 is probably the best game engine I've ever seen. It's too bad that it is not used for more games.

I really enjoyed the sourcebooks, but Mongoose Conan never did anything for me as a rules set. I have a pristine copy of 2e sitting around here I got for 5 bucks when Mongoose blew them out. I will ebay it when they get really collectible ;)

But, different strokes and all.
 

mrm1138

Explorer
You mention 5E. Now, there's a rule set that looks like its done "right" to me. I haven't played it, or even dug into it, but I like much of what I see.

Yeah, I'm a big fan! Admittedly, this is the first edition of D&D I've ever played (outside of an aborted attempt at 4e), but I can't imagine preferring any other. It's definitely less tactical than 3e or 4e, and that's a major part of what I like about it.

I'd be extremely happy with the new Conan game went with 5E D&D rules, or at least produced a 5E compatible version. That would be the version I would buy.

I really wish Sasquatch Game Studio would make a 5e-compatible version of the aforementioned Primeval Thule. Everything I've read about the setting is great and sounds perfect for that type of sword & sorcery campaign, but it's only available for 4e, Pathfinder, and 13th Age.
 

Water Bob

Adventurer
For those that don't know (and, I know a lot of people are unfamiliar with the 2d20 system), this is how the new Conan RPG is going to work, as far as I understand it.

Please correct me if I am wrong about any of this.





Task Difficulty is measured in successes.

Average = 1
Challenging = 2
Daunting = 3
Dire = 4
Epic = 5




Characters have Attributes and Skills.

In order to roll a task, you roll one or more d20 dice. The default is two d20 dice, which is why the system is called 2d20.

Attribute + Skill = Target Number.

When you roll under (or equal) your Target Number, you gain a success.

If you also roll under (or equal) your Skill Number, you gain a bonus success.

Thus, if you had Attribute 9 and Skill 2, you would gain a success for every time you rolled 11 or less. And, you would gain an additional success if the die was also 2 or less.



Example.

You need to complete a task, and the Game Master has said that the task requires two successes.

You have Attribute 9 and Skill 2. Your Target Number is 11.

You roll two d20 dice, and get 2, 14. You rolled two successes. Both successes came on the first die roll. It was equal to or lower than both your target number and your skill level. The second die, you failed the task. Thus, on this roll, you rolled two successes and one failure. Failures cancel out successes. Thus, for the total roll, you failed the task because you only rolled one success (you needed two successes to succeed on the task).





Natural 20.

If you roll a natural 20, this is a Critical Failure. The GM will do one of two things with a Crit. He will immediately do something against the character who made the roll. Like this:

Extending the example above, you are trying to open a locked chest. It's a Challenging difficulty, so you need 2 successes. You have the appropriate attribute 11 and appropriate skill 2, meaning that your target number is 13/2 (13 for less for a success and 2 or less for a success).

You roll 2d20 and get: 20, 9.

That's a Critical Failure and a single success in the same roll.

You don't have enough successes to open the lock, so you failed there.

And, you rolled a Crit that your GM decides to implement immediately...

You feel a sharp, quick pain and look down to see that the lock was trapped, and there is a small red dot of a pin prick in your hand. You're sure that you've been poisoned.

Note that it is possible to both be successful at a task and roll a failure. Had the lock required only 1 success, then you would have opened the lock AND sprung the trap.



This is a part of the rules I'm fuzzy on: Do Crit Failures not also cancel out successes? Or, is it only normal failures? If so, how is a successful task rolled with a failure?





Momentum

Any time you roll more successes than you need, you get Points. This is called momentum. If you need 2 successes, and you roll 4 successes, then you have 2 momentum.

When you roll momentum, you can spend the points you get to do extra stuff.

1 point per extra d6 can be spent to get you extra damage from a successful attack.

1 point spent can get you a called shot with your success. You choose the hit location instead of rolling it.

2 points spent can get you a second hit location. You do normal damage to your original hit location, then you roll for a second hit location and do half damage to that area.

1 point spent can allow you to re-roll any number of dice that you roll for damage.

Stuff like that.





A player can throw any number of dice when making a task. (I'm fuzzy about this, too. I think it is correct.) More dice gives you more chances to roll successes, but it also gives you more chances to roll failures and Critical Failures.





Bad Points.

The GM starts the game with a certain number of Bad Points. I call them "Bad Points" because the writers of the Conan game haven't yet decided on a name for these points when last I read the beta test rules. "Bad Points" will work for our illustrative purposes here.

The Bad Points represent the obstacles, challenge, and evil forces working against the characters.

Whenever a Player rolls a Critical Failure (a natural 20), two Bad Points are added to the pool (unless the GM immediately imposed a complication on the player, as I outlined above in the example where the character was hit with a poison needle from the trapped trunk).

Anytime a player adds dice to a throw, add a Bad Point for each extra die used.

You don't have to do any bookkeeping with these Bad Points. Just use a token. The game will probably come with some type of token to use. Everybody has a lot of six sided dice. Use those. Any time a Bad Point is added to the pool, drop a d6 token die into a cup. The cup holds the total Bad Points available to the GM. I've read that some GMs who like the system use this as a way to mount dread on the players--a clear glass or bowl used to hold the Bad Point tokens. As they see the bowl fill up, they know the crap is going to hit the fan.

Personally, I don't like this meta-gaming at all. If I want to hit my players with foreboding, I'll do it. Sometimes, I want surprises--I don't want them expecting twists and turns in the game.



Spending Bad Points

NPCs normally act, in this game, after the PCs. Bad Points can be spent to allow NPCs to act before a PC or to even interrupt a PC's turn.

Bad Points can be spent to introduce unforeseen problems. The GM uses these points to make things worse for the players. This used to be called "bad GMing", when a GM takes advantage and makes a situation worse than it was supposed to originally be.







ANOTHER COMMENT

When I first started my Mongoose d20 Conan game (my first campaign), I used the optional d20 rule called Active Defense. This is where character's don't have static numbers for Armor Class. Instead, the player rolls his defense.

Basically, an AC value is akin to Taking Ten on a defense roll. If you have AC 13, then your Active Defense roll is d20 + 3.

I used this with the Conan game. And, it was fun, to a point. But, I noticed something. The game was less immersive. By having my players roll the defense actively, the players became more aware that they were playing a game. Rolling the die for defense took them out of the story and focused them on the dice rolling.

When I went back to using static AC numbers, with the players no longer fiddling with rolling their defense, what do you know! My players found themselves more immersed in the game. They weren't thinking about the dice roll and if they could beat my dice attack roll. They were picturing the fight in their heads. I would roll behind my screen so that the players could not see my attacks. And, this way, they had to listen to my description of the encounter--which is a lot more immersive than just watching one die beat another--to see if they were hit.

They lived through the experience. They envisioned it.

And, this certainly wasn't happening as often or a deeply when they were rolling their Active Defenses.



I see the 2d20 in the same light. Although it claims to be, it's not an immersive system. It focuses the characters on dice rolling. If focuses them on game mechanics. When, the players really should be focusing their thoughts on living through the action as their characters.



I said above, too, that I dislike the way Momentum and the Bad Points pool affect the game. Back in my AD&D days, I used a rule where a natural one meant a fumble, and a fumble was whatever the GM could make up at the time. Sometimes, I had some neat ideas for fumbles. Other times, I didn't. But, the natural "1" was still there on the die, and I had to make up something.

Also, I found this openness with the fumble led to arguments between me and the players. I'd come up with something that I thought appropriate and fitting to the situation. The player wouldn't like it and think it was unfair--too strict compared to what I had done for another person when his character rolled a fumble.

I ended up with coming up with a standard rule that if a natural "1" was thrown, it meant you opened up in combat, let your guard down, and your foe got a free attack on you (what would later be called an Attack of Opportunity in 3rd Edition).

I see these points in the new Conan game forcing issues like this. I don't see it as a good thing at all. I understand that Momentum can be used by player to have their characters pull of stunts and heroic actions that the player makes up. This is just like my Fumble rule (but in reverse) above. I don't think it will play will and lead to arguments.

As for the "Bad Points", again, I don't like them. I don't want to be forced to do anything with them as a GM. If I want an additional guard detachment to come down the hall, then I'll have them come. Or, I'll roll a Listen check or something like that to see if the guards hear the PCs fighting their comrades. I don't need a mass of Bad Points to have those other guards come down the hall, and I don't want to wait on getting the Bat Points to a level I need them in order to activate my other guards.





So, yeah, I'm against the 2d20 system for the new Conan game. If it stays, there's a 90% chance that I will not be buying the new game. I may not have the game system completely correct, but I think I'm close enough to fairly evaluate it. Again, please. If you see me say something that is incorrect about the game, then please correct me.

I've heard that the company publishing the new Conan game has a history or dual publishing. If they publish the new Conan game using the 5E rules, then they've got me. I've looked at the new D&D 5E rules, and I'm quite impressed. They are less crunch than either 3rd or 4th edition, and they have an early AD&D feel to them. Yet, they still include the more modern aspects of the d20 system (such as Feats). I think WotC hit the ball out of the park with this new edition of D&D.

I would highly welcome a Conan game based on those rules.
 

modiphius

Explorer
Hi there,

"Thus, if you had Attribute 9 and Skill 2, you would gain a success for every time you rolled 11 or less. And, you would gain an additional success if the die was also 2 or less."
- actually you need to roll under the total of your Attribute and skill (11 or less) and you get a success, then if you roll under your skills 'Focus' you get a second success. Player's then have the dilemma of increasing their Skill total (expertise) so they have a greater chance of getting a success, or their 'focus' so they are more likely to have a great impact with their success.

"This is a part of the rules I'm fuzzy on: Do Crit Failures not also cancel out successes? Or, is it only normal failures? If so, how is a successful task rolled with a failure?"
- a success and a Repercussion (it's only a critical fail if you rolled a 20 on one or more d20's AND failed the test ) means the GM takes 2 Threat if they can't think of anything, but the repercussion is basically something inconvenient - the characters causes an unwelcome noise, steps out of the shadows or cover, causes some form of insult, slips on the cliff, drops something etc. A critical fail - two 20's would make this much worse, let alone with the consequence of failing the test.

"A player can throw any number of dice when making a task. (I'm fuzzy about this, too. I think it is correct.) More dice gives you more chances to roll successes, but it also gives you more chances to roll failures and Critical Failures."
- every extra d20 you roll on top of the basic 2d20's costs one Threat which is given to the GM (there's an endless pool of Threat to give to the GM if you're silly enough to use it...).
- In addition to your note re Momentum players can make up stuff that they do with their momentum, swinging wildly off chandeliers, kicking multiple heads in etc etc.

"Bad Points can be spent to introduce unforeseen problems. The GM uses these points to make things worse for the players. This used to be called "bad GMing", when a GM takes advantage and makes a situation worse than it was supposed to originally be."
- The reason there are lots of 'Threat' for the GM to spend is because the players have been buying shed loads of extra d20's OR failing lots of bad rolls (unlikely but possible in rare cases). The point is you don't game it. If the players are doing badly you don't load on worse events. Just as you don't in a normal game. You don't HAVE to spend Threat. It's there to use when you want it. You also aren't restricted to scripting in events, a horde of mercenaries arrive in 3 turns if they haven't broken down the gate... I don't need to spend Threat to bring them in as I've written it in as a GM, however I spend Threat if I want mercs to activate before one or all of the players.

"Back in my AD&D days, I used a rule where a natural one meant a fumble, and a fumble was whatever the GM could make up at the time. Sometimes, I had some neat ideas for fumbles. Other times, I didn't. But, the natural "1" was still there on the die, and I had to make up something."
- We have that - rolling a Repercussion / 20 on a d20. However we don't force you to make something up either.

"And, this way, they had to listen to my description of the encounter--which is a lot more immersive than just watching one die beat another--to see if they were hit."
- There's no watching one die beat another. You roll to hit, that's it, just like most other rpg's.
- 2d20 also encourages players to describe their actions using the momentum so they're part of the story telling process, not just the GM but the simply structure stops it from straying too far in to narrative gaming. It keeps it manageable for new GM's as well.

"This is just like my Fumble rule (but in reverse) above. I don't think it will play will and lead to arguments"
- Well we're two games in - Mutant Chronicles and Infinity and it does play well according to the fans who are finding it allows great cinematic action. We're doing a series of you tube videos showing it being played soon - and you're welcome to join in a skype session to help allay some of your fears. When I first read Spirit of the Century (fate system) I had to re-read it three times to get my head around the mechanics but it's one of the simplest systems to play and teach and a massive seller yet there were people all over it hating the 'wrong new way of doing things'.
 
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Water Bob

Adventurer
Hi there,

Hello. Good to speak to you again.



"Thus, if you had Attribute 9 and Skill 2, you would gain a success for every time you rolled 11 or less. And, you would gain an additional success if the die was also 2 or less."

- actually you need to roll under the total of your Attribute and skill (11 or less) and you get a success, then if you roll under your skills 'Focus' you get a second success. Player's then have the dilemma of increasing their Skill total (expertise) so they have a greater chance of getting a success, or their 'focus' so they are more likely to have a great impact with their success.

Isn't that what I said?

Attribute = 9
Skill = 2

You get one success if you roll 11 or less.

You get a bonus success if you roll 2 or less.

Or...am I still missing something here?





"This is a part of the rules I'm fuzzy on: Do Crit Failures not also cancel out successes? Or, is it only normal failures? If so, how is a successful task rolled with a failure?"

- a success and a Repercussion (it's only a critical fail if you rolled a 20 on both dice) means the GM takes 2 Threat if they can't think of anything, but the repercussion is basically something inconvenient

You have to roll a 20 on both dice to get a Crit?

So, the more dice you roll, the probability of a Crit goes exponentially down? A Crit becomes more unlikely, but your opportunity to throw successes goes up?



And...do failure cross out successes, as I suggested above?

If I roll 3 successes and two normal failures (not Crit), isn't that equal to 1 success?



"A player can throw any number of dice when making a task. (I'm fuzzy about this, too. I think it is correct.) More dice gives you more chances to roll successes, but it also gives you more chances to roll failures and Critical Failures."

- every extra d20 you roll on top of the basic 2d20's costs one Threat which is given to the GM (there's an endless pool of Threat to give to the GM if you're silly enough to use it...).

- In addition to your note re Momentum players can make up stuff that they do with their momentum, swinging wildly off chandeliers, kicking multiple heads in etc etc.

I thought I covered these two points. I know the first point is covered in the "Bad Points" section of my comments above.





"Bad Points can be spent to introduce unforeseen problems. The GM uses these points to make things worse for the players. This used to be called "bad GMing", when a GM takes advantage and makes a situation worse than it was supposed to originally be."

- The reason there are lots of 'Threat' for the GM to spend is because the players have been buying shed loads of extra d20's OR failing lots of bad rolls (unlikely but possible in rare cases). The point is you don't game it.

So....the GM can punish the players if they get on a bad rolling streak?

That's not "gaming it"?

And, if the GM does use the Bad Points, why does it make sense to have circumstances get worse for the players because they've been making some bad rolls?




If the players are doing badly you don't load on worse events. Just as you don't in a normal game. You don't HAVE to spend Threat. It's there to use when you want it.

And, this doesn't lead to arguments and the players feeling like the GM is out to get them because of how the GM spends these Bad Points?





"And, this way, they had to listen to my description of the encounter--which is a lot more immersive than just watching one die beat another--to see if they were hit."

- There's no watching one die beat another. You roll to hit, that's it, just like most other rpg's.

Aren't you looking at 2 or more d20 dice, first looking to see if Skill + Attribute was thrown, then checking to see if Skill or less was thrown...on each die?

That's a focus on dice, not on roleplaying.

Then, you may be collecting tokens for use in the game (Bad Points). That's a focus on mechanics, not roleplaying.

Very fiddly and gimmicky.





We're doing a series of you tube videos showing it being played soon - and you're welcome to join in a skype session to help allay some of your fears.

I'm looking forward to watching the YouTube videos.

I wish you guys would use a more traditional system, though. As I said in my post above, I'd do backflips if you had a version of the game using the D&D 5E rules.
 

modiphius

Explorer
"Isn't that what I said?
Attribute = 9
Skill = 2
You get one success if you roll 11 or less.
You get a bonus success if you roll 2 or less.
Or...am I still missing something here?"

- Sorry yes, it was the wording referring to the '2' as the skill that might have confused some people.

"You have to roll a 20 on both dice to get a Crit?
So, the more dice you roll, the probability of a Crit goes exponentially down? A Crit becomes more unlikely, but your opportunity to throw successes goes up?"

- No it's any combination of one or more Repercussions (20's) on a test that does not succeed. So there's a greater chance of rolling a Repercussion the more d20's you buy, but you're also pushing fate a lot to do it.


"And...do failure cross out successes, as I suggested above?"
- no a failure is just a failure. So a success and a Repercussion (20) is like success at a cost - yes you shot the arrow on target but you had to step out of cover to do it. Successes don't get negated.

"If I roll 3 successes and two normal failures (not Crit), isn't that equal to 1 success?"
- no you rolled 3 successes, you don't negate successes. Repercussions (what you're calling Crit's) don't negate successes either, they just cause unwelcome events. They become a Critical Fail if you rolled Repercussions AND no successes.


"So....the GM can punish the players if they get on a bad rolling streak?
That's not "gaming it"?"

- if he's a bad GM yes, just as you can punish players for absolutely no reason at all in any other RPG system. I can put a thousands orcs on the other side of that door if I want to. If you're playing with that kind of GM I suggest you get a new GM.

"And, if the GM does use the Bad Points, why does it make sense to have circumstances get worse for the players because they've been making some bad rolls?"

- In D&D i could have a bad streak and fumble with every roll of a d20. In 2d20 I could have a bad streak and roll 20's on every roll. It's very very unlikely but in both cases the players suffer for their bad rolling (remember the GM doesn't have to take the 2 Threat, he can just cause an inconvenience instead and if he takes the Threat points he doesn't have to spend them, so the players won't be punished for bad rolling.

The case you're pointing out is no different in 2d20 than any other game with a fumble roll. However you're also looking at it from the glass is half empty perspective. Character's rolling badly should be a queue for the GM to make life interesting for the players. They tripped up running from the guards so get captured and get to meet the thief in the dungeons. When bad things happen in the rolls these should be dramatic queues not failures. If you're seeing the players as being punished for events turning against them it's the wrong way to see this. Events are turning against them, and it's the challenge to rise above the difficulties through their imagination and clever thinking. If players are rolling badly I go easy on them, what good GM doesn't, but I follow the queues to make them realise that failure has a cost - but it usually brings them in to the action and story - and that's how legends are born!


"Aren't you looking at 2 or more d20 dice, first looking to see if Skill + Attribute was thrown, then checking to see if Skill or less was thrown...on each die? That's a focus on dice, not on roleplaying.

- Well Fate Core has you rolling 4 Fate dice and adding and subtracting +'s and -'s and yet it's one of the simplest systems out there. D&D 5th edition has you rolling an extra dice in negative or positively advantageous situations and using the best or worst dice. In 2d20 you only check to see if you rolled under your focus if you rolled a success. It becomes second nature because the numbers don't change in a rush. You'll also only have Focus in some trained skills, not in all of them. So sometimes you won't even have Focus to check.

"Then, you may be collecting tokens for use in the game (Bad Points). That's a focus on mechanics, not roleplaying."

- Players don't collect tokens, the GM does. He manages the Threat Pool. I have a pile of dice on the table. players grab one or more and throw them in the bowl if they buy d20's for their skill tests. I grab them and throw them in the pool if I take threat when they roll repercussions. Then I spend them out of the bowl. As each rattles in too the bowl you can see people thinking 'oh no....' Player's who've tried it really enjoy the atmosphere it helps to create - which is really just adding to what the GM and players are creating together. I don't think there's any more focus on mechanics here than in most other systems, and the use of Momentum gives powers to the players to forget about spending action points on set tables of actions, to describing what they actually want to do.
 

mrm1138

Explorer
- a success and a Repercussion (it's only a critical fail if you rolled a 20 on both dice) means the GM takes 2 Threat if they can't think of anything, but the repercussion is basically something inconvenient

Has the critical failure rule changed since the release of the public beta playtest of Mutant Chronicles? Here's what that book says about critical failures:

Critical failure occurs when a character does not generate enough successes to pass the test, and also rolls one or more natural 20s.

In other words, if the TN is 11, and you roll a 12 and a 20, that's considered a crit failure because you didn't roll any successes. If, however, you rolled a 10 and 20, that would be a success with repercussions. The thing that makes rolling two natural 20s worse is that the GM can impose a consequence or complication per natural 20 or add whatever Conan's equivalent of Dark Symmetry points will be.
 

modiphius

Explorer
Sorry my mistake on the earlier, comment I corrected it in the later post. A Crit Fail only happens when you roll one or more 20's AND fail on your skill test. I'll edit my earlier post!
 

Garry Harper

First Post
Robert E. Howard's Conan roleplaying game Kickstarter

We've just launched Robert E. Howard's Conan roleplaying game Kickstarter and we've managed to pull together one of the biggest line-ups ever for a roleplaying game led by Brom and featuring Tim Truman, Estaban Maroto, Mark Schultz, Tomas Giorello, Sanjulian, Liam Sharp, Simon Bisley, Daren Bader, Val Mayerik, Aleksi Briclot, Carl Critchlow, Phroilan Gardner, Paolo Parente, Tom Grindberg, Alex Horley, Simon Bisley, Giogio Baroni, Josh Hass, Michael Syrigos & Jorge Barerro - with some more big names still to be announced.

It's using Modiphius 2d20 system which is used in Mutant Chronicles, Infinity and John Carter RPG's - a fast flowing cinematic roleplaying system. Every book in the Conan range is a gorgeous full colour hardback and written by an amazing line up of writers led by Jason Durall and Conan scholar Jeffrey Shanks. The whole line is being lovingly crafted to be true to the original stories and this is truly Conan roleplaying as Robert E. Howard wrote it – savage pulp adventure battling ancient horrors in the Hyborian Age.

You can find this via our website Modiphius - I would post a link but this site not allowing me ;)
 

Water Bob

Adventurer
The game looks like it just might be AMAZING, too.

Except for this...




It's using Modiphius 2d20 system which is used in Mutant Chronicles, Infinity and John Carter RPG's - a fast flowing cinematic roleplaying system.


I pray to Crom that you guys release another version with better rules. Metagame mechanics is not my thing.

But, Crom has deaf ears for prayers, we all know.
 

modiphius

Explorer
Sorry Bob - you can always go back to old Mongoose Conan or TSR's Conan if you don't like 2d20 that much. As the popularity of Mutant Chronicles, Infinity and Conan is showing it's not going to change :) I would actually try the Conan quickstart which will launch later today. Once you've actually played the system you might think otherwise, as many people who started out not liking it have done so and gone on to become it's biggest fans.

We have two major licensed RPG's in 2017 launching that will also use 2d20, another two or three smaller rpg's later this year and several in partnership with other companies so 2d20 is not going away I'm afraid. We plan an unprecedented level of support for the community and particularly GM's. It's going to be a fun ride so I hope you'll be coming along :)
 

Water Bob

Adventurer
Sorry Bob - you can always go back to old Mongoose Conan or TSR's Conan if you don't like 2d20 that much.

Yes, that's what I will do. I like the Mongoose Conan game quite a bit. I'll stick with it.

I may buy some of your adventures, though, for use in my Mongoose Conan game.



As the popularity of Mutant Chronicles, Infinity and Conan is showing it's not going to change :)

Doesn't need to change. I just wanted an alternative. I know there are tons of people who do not like the 2d20 system.

I was hoping your Conan game would go the route of something like Primeval Thule and publish in different systems.

Oh well. Good luck! Looks like there are those, who do, indeed, like the 2d20 system, metagame mechanics and all.






I would actually try the Conan quickstart which will launch later today. Once you've actually played the system you might think otherwise, as many people who started out not liking it have done so and gone on to become it's biggest fans.

We have two major licensed RPG's in 2017 launching that will also use 2d20, another two or three smaller rpg's later this year and several in partnership with other companies so 2d20 is not going away I'm afraid. We plan an unprecedented level of support for the community and particularly GM's. It's going to be a fun ride so I hope you'll be coming along :)

Thanks, but I've looked very closely at 2d20, and I think it is an extremely bad system. It's gimmicky and features a glaring meta-game aspect to it. I don't like it at all.

I've presented it to my players, and the response I got was, "If you go to that for our Conan game, then we're not going to play."

We just don't like it.

But, good luck. I see the Kickstarter funded quickly. That's good news for you.
 

Sorry Bob - you can always go back to old Mongoose Conan or TSR's Conan if you don't like 2d20 that much. As the popularity of Mutant Chronicles, Infinity and Conan is showing it's not going to change :) I would actually try the Conan quickstart which will launch later today. Once you've actually played the system you might think otherwise, as many people who started out not liking it have done so and gone on to become it's biggest fans.

I'm looking forward to trying it. I've never used 2d20 but I'm willing to give it a go.

modiphius said:
We have two major licensed RPG's in 2017 launching that will also use 2d20, another two or three smaller rpg's later this year and several in partnership with other companies so 2d20 is not going away I'm afraid. We plan an unprecedented level of support for the community and particularly GM's. It's going to be a fun ride so I hope you'll be coming along :)

Is the other game Thunderbirds!?
 




Erekose

Eternal Champion
Yes, that's what I will do. I like the Mongoose Conan game quite a bit. I'll stick with it.

I may buy some of your adventures, though, for use in my Mongoose Conan game.

Doesn't need to change. I just wanted an alternative. I know there are tons of people who do not like the 2d20 system.

I was hoping your Conan game would go the route of something like Primeval Thule and publish in different systems.

Oh well. Good luck! Looks like there are those, who do, indeed, like the 2d20 system, metagame mechanics and all.

Thanks, but I've looked very closely at 2d20, and I think it is an extremely bad system. It's gimmicky and features a glaring meta-game aspect to it. I don't like it at all.

I've presented it to my players, and the response I got was, "If you go to that for our Conan game, then we're not going to play."

We just don't like it.

But, good luck. I see the Kickstarter funded quickly. That's good news for you.

I think we were hoping for similar things Water Bob - sadly this isn't going to happen. As I have most (if not all) of the Mongoose supplements I'm not sure what (if anything) the Modiphus version would have to offer???

I imagine it'll boil down to just the adventures . . .

That said, as I was a Kickstarter backer of Achtung! Cthulhu I've every confidence that they'll deliver a high quality product . . . just not with a rulesystem that's to everyone's taste.
 

modiphius

Explorer
Man I would love some kinda Superhero RPG using the 2d20 system you have or a horror. :)

That's a fun idea.... we'd like to do a superhero one at some point for sure. You get a big dose of cosmic horror in Conan and also Mutant Chronicles - both encourage horror and resulting sanity effects

Oh really?

Can you tell us about it at this point?

Not just yet we want to do a lot more work on it before we unveil it, but it's going to massive :)
 

Water Bob

Adventurer
That said, as I was a Kickstarter backer of Achtung! Cthulhu I've every confidence that they'll deliver a high quality product . . . just not with a rulesystem that's to everyone's taste.

Yes, I've said it before. I like everything I see about this company and their products except the awful 2d20 System. I cringe every time they reveal a new title and shrug about another opportunity missed. It's really too bad that they've strapped their future to this divisive system that many do not like. I feel like they are shooting themselves in the foot. But, some like the system. I guess it's enough.
 

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