Check Out This 43-Page Preview of the Unity RPG

Unity is a grim fantasy world mixed with elements of arcane technology from Zensara Studios. Modiphius has posted a free 43-page preview of the game. "The game takes place in a realm torn apart by the very same God that created it. His children, the four races of Unity, were punished for their hubris and left for dead. Now they struggle to come together and unite against the grim horrors of a world on fire."


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The core rulebook is already available. You can find the 43-page preview here, which includes "an introduction to basic rules, write-ups on the playable races, combat and combo examples, full Tier 1 power list for the Dreadnought class, examples of enemies you’ll encounter and more."

There's new stuff coming soon, too, including Unity United (four new playable races), The Poison Within ( a PDF adventure), and the new Monk Class.



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Russ Morrissey

Comments

I'm a big Modiphius fan and I've been watching this game to see if I want to jump on board. Thanks for the information, Russ. I'm going to download the preview straight away and take a look at it. (I'll still probably play it with the Savage Worlds rules.)
 
I know, why do I need another class based fantasy game, this one has a lot of interesting bits. Mechanically it has it's roots in D&D4E, but adds in more RP elements during character creation. And makes the game far less fiddly on the game masters side of life, the GM doesn't even roll dice. It keeps fiddly combat for the players, in the form of resource management, and combat options that chain off each other. Also you roll 2d10 instead of a d20, which makes the math a bit more consistent. As you should roll around 11 more often than not. In short it should be much easier to run on the internet, as you don't need a grid, just a dice rolling program.

The fluff has a Blizzard vibe to it in both the art direction and classes. If you strip the setting out, the Classes could be used in a Diablo style game very easily. The classes are Dreadnought (tanky fighter), Driftwalker (Warlock but with more body horror), Fell Hunter (think Diablo Demon Hunter), Judge (Paladin or Diablo Crusader), Mystic (Wizard or Diablo Sorcerer), Phantom (Rogue), Priest (Cleric), Primalist (Druid, but with more of a DC Comic Vixen vibe), and Sentinel (melee fighter). The setting has a more World of Warcraft feel, although this world is clearly in it's post apocalypse.

It's worth checking out, there are a lot of good ideas in the book.
 

Stacie GmrGrl

Explorer
I keep trying to find the game online, but I only find links to the Unity programming language for program and video game design. (said with a touch of sarcasm)

This is one game I'm glad I backed on Kickstarter. It definitely needs a few more products to really flesh it out. It wins in the gorgeous art department. I don't think I've ever seen an rpg book be as expanded in size for sheer amount of artwork like this game.
 

Retreater

Adventurer
I didn't like the presentation of the rulebook. I know that seems like a silly reason to not like the system, but it just read badly. Like the first 100+ pages were setting fluff that I didn't find compelling. Whoever thought about putting fluff before rules content and character creation?
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
I didn't like the presentation of the rulebook. I know that seems like a silly reason to not like the system, but it just read badly. Like the first 100+ pages were setting fluff that I didn't find compelling. Whoever thought about putting fluff before rules content and character creation?
Man, it’s tough to please folks. I’ve had bad reviews of my game because I put the setting fluff *after* the rules content.
 
I didn't like the presentation of the rulebook. I know that seems like a silly reason to not like the system, but it just read badly. Like the first 100+ pages were setting fluff that I didn't find compelling. Whoever thought about putting fluff before rules content and character creation?
As my memory serves, and I'm probably wrong, but the 'fluff' before game really started with the White Wolf folks. There was fluff galore before even the first rule was intonation in 1st Edition Vampire. It was one of the things that made it 'unique' at the time, because it was story over everything else.

Of course with Vampire it's fluff first, during and after the rules, but again, that's the game, so to speak.

I also agree that I don't need another techno-magical post-apocalyptic fantasy setting. There seems to be a lot of them floating about in the RPG space now. I'm glad that they did the 'sampler' because I can look to see if there's anything that sets it apart and makes it better.

The one thing I will say, I know it's a 'sampler', so just some of the core rule book, but these things should always, ALWAYS include an introductory adventure. In my opinion, it's a mistake to leave something like that out.

Again, thanks Russ.
 

aramis erak

Explorer
I didn't like the presentation of the rulebook. I know that seems like a silly reason to not like the system, but it just read badly. Like the first 100+ pages were setting fluff that I didn't find compelling. Whoever thought about putting fluff before rules content and character creation?
That's actually been pretty well standard throughout the industry; excepting generic or genre-only games, and D&D, most everything else from major publishers starts with some intro-fluff these days.

Some of the genre-only games, such as FFG's End of the World line, include a bit of genre fluff in the front, too... only a handful of pages, but setting fluff in front, even there.
 

Retreater

Adventurer
That's actually been pretty well standard throughout the industry; excepting generic or genre-only games, and D&D, most everything else from major publishers starts with some intro-fluff these days.

Some of the genre-only games, such as FFG's End of the World line, include a bit of genre fluff in the front, too... only a handful of pages, but setting fluff in front, even there.
I get having a couple pages or even a whole chapter of fluff at the beginning, but this was a distracting amount (like 100+ pages). I come to rulebooks to learn the rules and find information in a well-organized reference guide, not to read a novel.

And granted, I could just "skip ahead" and look through the rules to see if it was a system I was interested in playing. It just felt like wasted space that most players don't need. (Imagine if Paizo published the Inner Sea World Guide with their Core Rulebook.)
 

ruemere

Explorer
The thing is that with Unity you get 120 pages of fluff first. Or, if you want to count setting information and covers, 136 pages of it.
The actual game starts with Character Creation (chapter two) on page 134 (136 if you count the cover and dedication page).

The book breakdown continued:
Chapter 3, Classes, page 156. 94 pages of class information.
Chapter 4, Core Rules, page 250. Brief and to the point.
Chapter 5, Combat Rules, page 258. Decent, it merges 13th Age, 4E and 5E's advantage/disadvantage.
Chapter 6, Colossal Combat, page 270. Since it's something not present in the previously mentioned books, here's chapter preview:
- Piloting a Titan Rig
- Titan Rig Combat
- Titan Rig Power (supply, and how it works).
- Sample Titagn Rigs and Colossal Monsters
Chapter 7, Equipment, page 282.
Chapter 8, Foes and Fiends, page 306. Not too many monsters (each takes a page, with some illustrations taking also toll on the count): 25. To be fair, some monsters are actually monster groupings.
Chapter 9, GM Guide, page 352.

So, assuming that you're for the content, and not the art (it's beautiful, and the layout is simply stellar - almost on the par with the Numenera), is the book worth it?

If you have a taste for fantasy, and you haven't invested already in 5E, 4E, 13th Age, the answer is most likely yes.

If you care about the setting:
Ma and Pa wanted to have babies, totally-not-Menilboean-Elves (with Protoss uplink), two-meter-tall-furry-not-Dwarves and lackluster-as-usual-but-of-course-on-the-rise-humans. Pa had a middle-age crisis, went off to buy some cigs and never returned. Ma pined for him, then decided to punish kids for being too noisy and too quarrelsome and almost accidentally killed them... yes, it gets dark - the kids pooled resources, picked knives and killed Ma.
Pa felt it in the ether, suddenly returned and declared end of days by fusing spirit world (that accidentally also housed demons of Id) and material world. He also punished the kids - broke Protoss uplink, granted rage issues to not-Dwarves and finally indirectly taught humans how to turn themselves into self-inflicted cyborgs (it's a fourth race, not an actual upgrade for humans).

If you're just looking for a game to have fun:
Unity is like a friend who tries too hard. Reach out to them, tell them to drop some of the stuff and it should work great for both of you. Otherwise, you may get buried under mechanical details (no, icons don't make a game interface great). Be prepared to do some work - despite the long intro, there is almost no ready-to-use in-game material (NPCs, scenarios, locations) - the Ruin section is a bit over a page and a half. Finally, the game follows a lot of fantasy tropes - don't expect it to surprise you.

Brace yourself, some random downsides are coming:
1. My PDF is copy-locked. If you're looking to copy/paste text, too bad.
2. A location is a wall of text. When I compare it to Cavaliers of Mars hardcover I get also Hooks, Characters and Hazards.

Hope this helps.

Regards,
Ruemere
 

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