D&D (2024) Could we get a Bloomburrow (Redwall) setting for 5.24?

Weiley31

Legend
I guess WotC D&D-team is more focused into update the crunch. The creation of new IP is for Magic team.

Other point is if they are going to create a new PC specie, or only the same racial traits but with a different look.

The Magic wiki says there are: badgers, bats, frogs, mice, lizards, otters, rabbits, racoons and squirels.

And they are sentient animals, not humanoids with animal traits. This means they keep their original size. Do you remember any tiny PC specie in 5ed? And the size difference with monsters like ordinary predators (wolves, for example). A simple fox would be a serious menace.

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The lore says if a humanoid travels to Bloomburrow automatically changes to an animal shape. This also should be a size change.

Maybe we could see some "Ral Zarek's Guide of Inhabitants and Creatures from Bloomburrow", but more focused to PC species and a short list of monsters.
WoTC: Make em all small size.
 

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Am I the only one who would like a Bloomburrow (from Magic the Gathering) setting book for D&D 5.24?
I am a big fan of the Redwall books, Wind in the Willows and similar anthropomorphized children tales and of course Reepicheep from the Narnia books.
There are already a couple alternatives: Mouse Guard and Mausritter. Or Humblewood for 5e. Or Mice & Mystics the boardgame.

But nonetheless an official anthropomorphized small animal setting for D&D 5.24 would be an insta buy for me.

What do you think?

Lets see what Bloomborrow ends up like first. Personally I would prefer a Duskmourn setting book, but I would not oppose a Bloomborrow book, I don't have that weird hate for furries that some do, although its not my jam.
 

I see a great potential for Duskmourn. Even it could be adapted to an action-live production, but a sourcebook would be mainly a monster compedium, or an adventure style "Saturday night in the hell". To be "playable" the lore should allow more opportunities to escape. Maybe in the future Valgavoth could be "defeated" and then other demons would steal part of "its" power to create their own "domains" style "ghost city", like almost spin-off.

Or there is a planar rift between Innistrad and Duskmourn, and then Valgavoth realises there are "unwanted guests" who can't feel fear in the same way.

I know this sounds totally crazy but I imagine a "micronauts-duskmourn" crossover. How? A group of humans don't survive, and then they are reincarnated into... action-figures. They are small but not the preys any more, and they want to help other humans to survive.

What if a native from Bloomburrow travels to other plane, would be changed the size?

Maybe Bloomburrow is very coold and fun, but the number of options for a long campaign is too low, because we only know the calamity beasts as antagonist forces, and a D&D setting needs a great variety of antagonist factions.
 

aco175

Legend
It might make a cute D&D junior edition. Put it in a box set 'targeted' to 6-12 year olds where they can play cute furry things that take on the wizard's cat or the sneak cheese out of the pantry past the sleeping dog. Risk tail braving the outside to cross the thing called a street.

Like crack dealers where the first one is free.
 


It might make a cute D&D junior edition. Put it in a box set 'targeted' to 6-12 year olds where they can play cute furry things that take on the wizard's cat or the sneak cheese out of the pantry past the sleeping dog. Risk tail braving the outside to cross the thing called a street.

I know nothing about Bloomburrow, and that certainly sounds like something kids could have fun with, but running a game like this using D&D (or even an adaptation) seems a bit like smashing a square peg into a round hole. D&D is at base, a game designed entirely around killing stuff. While cute furry animals doing this is not completely unknown in fiction (Watership Down, Duncton Tales, even Redwall etc), but it that what you'd be trying to sell here? It might be a bit of a jarring tonal shift when someone buys this to play with their 7 year old niece and then has to talk about death saves and incinerating people with fireballs. I had the same conceptual issue with Humblewood, to be honest.
 

Whizbang Dustyboots

Gnometown Hero
I had the same issue with Humblewood.
Those little guys love solving their problems through violence. I remember reading the reviews and being sort of flabbergasted, as I don't think that's the tone conveyed at all through their crowdfunding campaign and subsequent marketing.

That said, in fits and starts, 5E is expanding in what kind of adventures people expect it to tell -- Wild Beyond the Witchlight embraces talking one's way through trouble, which I don't think D&D has done since Beyond the Crystal Cave in the early 1980s, although neither of them are able to pull it off 100% -- and people will keep asking for D&D to support less-than-deadly play because it's the biggest game around, even if there are many other systems better suited for it.
 

people will keep asking for D&D to support less-than-deadly play because it's the biggest game around, even if there are many other systems better suited for it.
Oh, if WotC took this concept and made a whole sourcebook around the idea of 'non-fighting D&D' and chucked in half a dozen pages of rules and some DM guidance about how to make it work, and then made Bloomburrow the setting for it (like Ravenloft is the 'horror D&D setting') then I'd be all over it. It's not the stuff of introductory boxes for kids though.
 

Stormonu

Legend
I know nothing about Bloomburrow, and that certainly sounds like something kids could have fun with, but running a game like this using D&D (or even an adaptation) seems a bit like smashing a square peg into a round hole. D&D is at base, a game designed entirely around killing stuff. While cute furry animals doing this is not completely unknown in fiction (Watership Down, Duncton Tales, even Redwall etc), but it that what you'd be trying to sell here? It might be a bit of a jarring tonal shift when someone buys this to play with their 7 year old niece and then has to talk about death saves and incinerating people with fireballs. I had the same conceptual issue with Humblewood, to be honest.
Granted, things have sure changed since the 80's, but "take character off board after three rolls" I don't see as a problem.

I just want to add, Bloomburrow has its basis in media along the lines of:
Redwall
Secret of Nimh
Bunnies and Burrows
Humblewood
Disney's Robin Hood / Bedknobs and Broomsticks
An American Tale / Fiefel Goes West

It's not really based on, but has aspects of:
Watership Down
Reservoir Dogs (not the Tarantino Movie)

So there's quite a tonal range to use, and anthro characters have been around for some time, not just for Gen Z.
 


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