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Cypher System by Monte Cook Games: what do you think about it?

I've read a lot of good things about it. So I grabbed the humblebundle a couple weeks back.

I had no bleeding clue which book was the initial corebook. There's the "Discovery Corebook" and the "Destiny Corebook," and the "Numenera Players Guide." I started with Discovery, which seems to be the right one.

Actually skimming a bit in the discovery corebook...
1d20 for 3× Difficulty number... a bit coarse. That abilities shift the Difficulty in steps is no big deal for me.
All rolls player facing. I'm good with that.
Layout? functional and pretty.
Fixed damage, bonuses to in on 17+? Not a dealbreaker, but...
3 stats? Hmm...
Effort spending from stat pools? It's a way of giving a bonus
Att Pool, att edge, and max effort... it keeps the numbers in check. Spending pools to use abilities...

Initial classes... Glaive? Jack? Nano? Jack is a good label for what it is... but Glaive and Nano? If you have to have read the rulebook to understand what the class is about, it seems a bit pretentious.

Checking Destiny, the new types, again, are one clear (Wright), and one WTF? (Arkus) The third, Delve, is hinting at its competences.

I see influences from Fate, from Dying Earth, from D&D... I can also see some influences from Baker's Apocalypse World, but they're small and in tone. «GM interruptions» is a term that is clearly is from the narrativist playbook. (pun intended.) And it works very much like Fate «compels.» Those interruptions are the kind of thing that Baker was avoiding in AW; in AW, they are only for when the story stalls. In Fate, they're for enforcing the disad element of aspects.
Here, they're not clear on the why, only on the how.

Advancement seems to be potentially really quick, too.

I could see running it, but I wouldn't have been willing to pay the original price. It feels on first read like "Monte does Dying Earth better than Gary"...

It's definitely neither trad nor totally narrativist. Like Fate, it's a mechanicalized narrativism, with strong nods to Trad.

I've got other things to try first... And other things to return to before hand.
 

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It's definitely neither trad nor totally narrativist. Like Fate, it's a mechanicalized narrativism, with strong nods to Trad.

I've got other things to try first... And other things to return to before hand.
Some of the choices are a bit odd but the rules really encourage exploration and interaction as much as conflict, IMO. Additionally, for me at least, it requires the right group. Back in 2016 the group I had was great but preferred combat, but these days the group I'm with has some great role-players and we've played together long enough that the interactions are top-notch. If you try it, I hope it works out for you.
 

Dragonsbane

Proud Grognard
Sorry to raise this thread, but I saw that you had Private Message your notes to a few people and I was hoping you'd willing to do that for me. Thanks!
totally agree.. could you send me the pm?
thanks

BHH
I'd like to jump in on this too! :)
Sorry I didn't reply sooner, I don't read these forums much anymore.

Here ya go!

 

daddystabz

Explorer
It is one of my favorite systems of all-time and I've played/GM'ed nearly everything you can imagine in my over 30 years of TTRPG experience. Numenera is also one of my favorite settings ever. I disagree with a lot of the criticisms in this thread. I have a HUGE RPG collection and have read soooooo many games. Cypher simply rocks for me.
 

I've only played Numenera and it was thoroughly and unequivocally meh for me. There were some interesting ideas in the setting. But the basic mechanics simply gave almost nothing and indeed when the only effect being a strong character has is providing a spendable dice pool then the playing habits it encourages are turtling and avoiding the rules because you have basic skill at very little, just little chits that add to d10 rolls and that you want to keep for when they are valuable.
It is one of my favorite systems of all-time and I've played/GM'ed nearly everything you can imagine in my over 30 years of TTRPG experience. Numenera is also one of my favorite settings ever. I disagree with a lot of the criticisms in this thread. I have a HUGE RPG collection and have read soooooo many games. Cypher simply rocks for me.
Could you explain why? Becaue this isn't my experience at all.
 

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