D&D Next Q&A 9 August


log in or register to remove this ad


ZombieRoboNinja

First Post
Very cool. As for combat maneuvers - sounds easy. Here's the one everyone has access to through the narrative combat module:

Pushback: Attack with a -2 to hit. If you hit, after you deal damage, roll a strength contest against your opponent; if you succeed, they are pushed back one square.

...and so on. Meanwhile, the fighter gets:

Clashing Tide of Superfluous Text: use 1 combat superiority die to push the opponent back five feet on a successful attack.

So the fighter gets a guaranteed push if he hits and doesn't have a penalty to attack. (He loses 1 die of damage instead.) But non-fighters, and fighters without that power, can still get the job done, just less reliably.
 

ZombieRoboNinja

First Post
Also, what's this?

We’re also looking at giving you a third right out of the gate, based on the fighting style you selected.

I'd kind of assumed that once you've picked your combat superiority powers, that's all the in-class customization you get with the fighter. Does this mean there are more specific "fighting styles" built into the class (beyond the themes and backgrounds that all characters get)?
 

Sammael

Adventurer
OK, this makes me chuckle. WotC is clearly ripping my Fatebinder system off. ;)

I gave fighters Combat Superiority at 2nd level (though it's just a flat 1/2 Fighter level bonus to damage), they select a Fighting Style at 1st level (gaining a bonus to certain combat skills and several other benefits) and can improve it at levels 10 and 20 (or choose additional Fighting Styles if they prefer), and I also give fighters Maneuvers (replacing the 3.x bonus fighter feats) which sound eerily similar to Combat Superiority options. The last time I edited the Fighter class description on my wiki was in September 2011, by the way.

If any of the fine gentlemen at WotC would like to contact me to discuss adding more features from Fatebinder to D&D Next, I would be happy to discuss it with them :D
 

mlund

First Post
I suspect "Fighting Style" probably has at least a little to do with a broad class of weapons - things like Great Weapons, Pole Arms, Bows, One-Handed Weapon & Shield, Empty Handed, or Two-Weapon Fighting.

Some effect probably come earlier or easier depending on what implements you specialize in. Pole-arms are good for tripping and ensnaring. Great weapons are solid for knocking people around. Shield make it easier to press and maneuver in melee. Arrows make it easier to snipe and attack limbs faster than someone can block or dodge.

- Marty Lund
 

GX.Sigma

Adventurer
I'd kind of assumed that once you've picked your combat superiority powers, that's all the in-class customization you get with the fighter. Does this mean there are more specific "fighting styles" built into the class (beyond the themes and backgrounds that all characters get)?
God, I hope not. I thought the point of CS was that you could mix and match to create your own fighting style; not just pick a pre-baked one at level 1 and have all your future progression dictated by it.
 

Stormonu

Legend
Mike mentioned that the combat superiority dice could be used to deal more damage, soak damage, defend an ally, or some other interesting combat tricks. Could you give us some more examples of any of those combat tricks you’re looking at now? Sure. Right now, we’re looking at the ability to knock people prone, to push people around (think tide of iron, 4E players), to shift around the battlefield, ...


*Facepalm*


I was hoping they wouldn't do this. You shouldn't have to spend the CS dice to trip, bull rush and the like. I wouldn't mind if you spent a dice to do the effect AND damage, but I sure hope they don't make it you have to spend the dice TO do the action.
 

ComradeGnull

First Post
*Facepalm*


I was hoping they wouldn't do this. You shouldn't have to spend the CS dice to trip, bull rush and the like. I wouldn't mind if you spent a dice to do the effect AND damage, but I sure hope they don't make it you have to spend the dice TO do the action.

I thought the idea was that dice spending was an add-on to your ordinary attack- so you make your normal attack, then spend a die if you want to make a trip. Alternatively, you just make a trip attack and do no damage.
 

Sir Brennen

Legend
I was hoping they wouldn't do this. You shouldn't have to spend the CS dice to trip, bull rush and the like. I wouldn't mind if you spent a dice to do the effect AND damage, but I sure hope they don't make it you have to spend the dice TO do the action.
What? No. That's not what's being said at all. Otherwise how would anyone but a fighter trip or bull rush?

The Tide of Iron reference makes that fairly obvious. Make an attack, do damage and use your CS die to do extra damage or trip, push, etc. Other classes will likely have to spend their action for their turn just to make the trip attempt alone. Sure, there'll be other things that can be done with CS dice, but if they're options available to other classes, I'll bet the fighter is going to be better at it.
 

Mengu

First Post
They're still not answering why this innovative and unique mechanic can only be used with the fighter, and not with the rogue, wizard, or cleric.
 


Connorsrpg

Adventurer
I am definitely liking the sound of Combat Superiority. I love the dice mechanic.

A version of Combat Superiority is going to be in the next Playtest Package (August) isn't it?
 

They're still not answering why this innovative and unique mechanic can only be used with the fighter, and not with the rogue, wizard, or cleric.
Well, you may be able to, if you also visit Fighter School*. If not, sorry, you just didn't devote enough time to truely master the art of combat.

*) multiclassing, perhaps?
 

ZombieRoboNinja

First Post
Wizards get spells and cantrips. Cleric's get domains and channel divinities. Rogues get skill tricks and sneak attack dice.

Fighters have their own special toy now.

Agreed, but the sweetness of CS does raise another conundrum: the other martial classes will need to scramble to keep up.

Since the article makes pretty clear that the number and size of dice both increase in a linear fashion (so something like 1d4, 1d6, 2d6, 2d8, 3d8...) and given that a level 5 fighter gets 2d6 CS dice, it seems logical to think you'll have 3d8 by level 10 and somewhere north of 5d12 by level 20.

But to avoid any extra guessing, let's just use the 2d6 at level 5 mentioned in the first L&L article. This means that a level 5 archery-fighter can do 3d6 damage every round, without even a magic weapon. And if he's unexpectedly surrounded, he can switch his dice to defense, giving him a DR of 2-12. All the sudden, every fighter can do impressive damage with any weapon you put in his hand.

These numbers sound pretty cool to me, but they raise the standard for other classes. The rogue might hang in there damage-wise with sneak attack (especially at +1d6 per level), but compared to the fighter's numerous CS options, will the hide-sneak attack-hide pattern start to feel dull? To draw from Mengu's original question, where are the rogue's cool tricks?

And, more centrally, how are monks, paladins, rangers, and barbarians going to stay in the same vicinity as the fighter as martial warriors? Barbarians and paladins at least have rage and smite/spells, which could be strengthened and expanded to enhance those classes' combat schticks, but the ranger honestly might need something big.

And for that matter, wizard/cleric cantrips better scale significantly, or they'll be a comparative joke even by mid-levels.
 


GX.Sigma

Adventurer
Well, you may be able to, if you also visit Fighter School*. If not, sorry, you just didn't devote enough time to truely master the art of combat.

*) multiclassing, perhaps?
I like this answer, and I really really hope the system doesn't penalize you for taking levels in different classes every once in a while.
 

I like this answer, and I really really hope the system doesn't penalize you for taking levels in different classes every once in a while.
The chance for a robut multiclassing system seems to me very dependent on how "front-loaded" classes are, and how their ability scales.

In 3E, there was a lot of front-loading via saves and starting class features, but also a lot of stuff that was delayed for later. It sometimes dependend on the class. The Ranger was heavily front-loaded with his fighting style, tracking, skills and saves, where the Fighter only had that one feat more, basically. Taking at least one level of Ranger was a really good investment.

4E classes were even more front-loaded, by design, hence the multiclassing in 4E was a lot more restrictive. (I personally think they went too far with the power swap feats, they are too costly to be worth it. If they gave a tiny bit more - say, another skill training feat, or some other minor class feature... They could be worth it.)
 

Wednesday Boy

The Nerd WhoFell to Earth
D&D Next Q&A said:
Every fighter starts out with two “freebie” uses of the dice: adding damage onto your attacks, and reducing damage from incoming attacks. We’re also looking at giving you a third right out of the gate, based on the fighting style you selected.

Instead of having two freebie uses and a third customizable use, I would prefer to choose all three uses of CS dice. (Although it will be easy to fix with a houserule.)
 
Last edited:

They're still not answering why this innovative and unique mechanic can only be used with the fighter, and not with the rogue, wizard, or cleric.

:confused:

Brain. Hurting.

The #1 complaint in the fighter vs caster wars is " Theres nothing a fighter can do that a caster can't do better".

Now the powers that be want to give the fighter something that the other classes can't do better and you want to know why?
 

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top