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WotC Dragonlance Novels - How Many Are There?

akr71

Explorer
Surprised/not surprised. :p
I guessed a few dozen (in the 40 - 60 range). Does this count short story anthologies, cuz technically they're not novels.

I've read more than 10, less than 20 (just a guess), but the only ones I enjoyed were the original 6 (Chronicles & Legends) by Weiss & Hickman.
The Elven Nations trilogy was merely OK. My wife claims the Meetings Sextet is good, but I have not read them.
I thoroughly disliked Second Generation, Dragons of Summer Flame and War of the Souls.
 

Ath-kethin

Explorer
The greatest fun of Dragonlance novels was the myriad author's who clearly knew nothing about the world and/or repurposed books written for other worlds. The biggest problem with the novels is the same.

It's also fun to track the "let's hire Weis & Hickman to churn out a novel series to legitimitize the latest mechanical changes to the game" operations. It's painfully obvious 9nce you notice it.

All that notwithstanding: the War of Souls books are the best writing Weis & Hickman ever turned in, even if they also fell prey to the "forgot what was in earlier novels by Weis & Hickman" curse.
 
And yet no one (not even in this thread) acknowledges anything past the first three books, which while a classic story, have never made for good gaming modules. 😅

I've always been a fairly big fan of the series, even the dreaded Age of Mortals stuff, though I do acknowledge them for what they are: cheap fun throwaway fantasy novels with an ulterior purpose to promote the game setting and products. One shouldn't read them expecting Tolkien, G.R.R. Martin, or Frank Herbert level of writing, that has never been their purpose.

Also, seconding that mention of Death Gate Cycle for good stuff by Weis and Hickman. I'd wager that series is better for novel purposes, though I've considered trying a game in that setting at some point.

As for slightly newer Dragonlance fair? War of Souls is a must read of you are fans of the setting, albeit you may be a tad lost at parts all you've read is the original trilogy. I've also used the Rise of Solamnia and Amber and Ashes trilogies as fodder for Age of Mortals Campaigns several times now, and am currently running a campaign that is setup by the Dark Thane trilogy (and the subsequent sequels, albeit I'm not using them near as much) to run a Dwarven game heavily influenced by the Hobbit.
 
Are those unique novels or counting re-releases and omnibuses as separate novels?
I don't know.

Don't tell anyone in this thread, but I think I've read fewer than 10 Dragonlance novels--and most of those when I was younger and borrowed them from other people or libraries.
 
I’d also include the Dragonlance Legends trilogy. And heck, I’d even say that it’s the stronger work for the smaller cast of characters.

The Dragonlance series is a comfort food read, absolutely. No great literary experience, but fun reads nonetheless. I’ll freely admit that part of that is in no small part to nostalgia. Though, they’ve aged better than some of the other TSR-published novels.

I started re-reading the Death Gate Cycle recently. So far the first book, at the least, holds up better than I thought it would.


And yet no one (not even in this thread) acknowledges anything past the first three books, which while a classic story, have never made for good gaming modules. 😅

I've always been a fairly big fan of the series, even the dreaded Age of Mortals stuff, though I do acknowledge them for what they are: cheap fun throwaway fantasy novels with an ulterior purpose to promote the game setting and products. One shouldn't read them expecting Tolkien, G.R.R. Martin, or Frank Herbert level of writing, that has never been their purpose.

Also, seconding that mention of Death Gate Cycle for good stuff by Weis and Hickman. I'd wager that series is better for novel purposes, though I've considered trying a game in that setting at some point.
 

BookBarbarian

Expert Long Rester
I’d also include the Dragonlance Legends trilogy. And heck, I’d even say that it’s the stronger work for the smaller cast of characters.
Agreed.

The Dragonlance series is a comfort food read, absolutely. No great literary experience, but fun reads nonetheless. I’ll freely admit that part of that is in no small part to nostalgia. Though, they’ve aged better than some of the other TSR-published novels.
I've read a lot worse Young adult fantasy that's for sure.

For example I read a bunch of awful Ravenloft novels as a kid too.

I started re-reading the Death Gate Cycle recently. So far the first book, at the least, holds up better than I thought it would.
Also agreed.
 

Inchoroi

Explorer
Personally, I do not recommend Dragonlance novels even though I love the setting (In fact, I'm running my current campaign there).
I think that the world of Krynn works well as a stage to play in it but, although I respect the work of Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman as authors, the novels do not offer anything interesting and do not seem very well written to me.
I would add the only caveat being the original Dragonlance novels, because there's no other books I've ever read that reads so much like an actual D&D adventure with somewhat uncooperative players. Just read them for nostalgia, and then make the setting your own, in other words.
 

Voadam

Adventurer
I was guessing around 120. I read about two dozen or so. _Weasel's Luck_ is my personal favorite. The short story that ran in Dragon, and then later in an anthology, about Tasslehoff and Demogorgon is a lot of fun too.

I think _Dragons of Summer Flame_ is the latest in in-world chronology that I read while the later Hickman Weiss extra stories of the Chronicles era were the last that I read as far as publishing date. I've read the 3e Campaign Setting book cover to cover though so I am familiar with the Age of Mortals and post big dragon era.
 

jonesy

Hero
Are those unique novels or counting re-releases and omnibuses as separate novels?
It's been so long since I've opened the boxes that I decided to check what I have here.

That's about 100 unique books, so a lot less than I thought.

But that's not all of them. For example, I know I have Hammer and the Axe, and The Covenant of the Forge, but can't find them. I have a box or two in storage with more books (most of those are different versions, but the missing novels have to be there too).

So, add to that all the young reader books (none of which I own).

Edit: I also can't find either Destiny or Alliances, or any of the four books in the Anvil of Time series.
 

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jonesy

Hero
Alright, I finished my inventory and here are the results. Books still missing from my photo:

Hammer and the Axe
The Covenant of the Forge
Destiny
Alliances
Prisoner of Haven
The Players of Gilean
Renegade Wizards
The Gargoyle King
The Forest King
Lord of the Rose
The Black Talon
The Survivors
The Sellword
Dragons of Time
Brother of the Dragon
Death March
Sister of the Sword
Children of the Plains
Knights of the Rose
The Inheritance
The Great White Wyrm
Protecting Palanthas
Weasel's Luck
A Hero's Justice
The Alien Sea
Saving Solace
Knights of the Crown
Knights of the Sword
Wayward Knights
The Measure and the Truth
Theros Ironfeld
The Messenger
Maquesta Kar-Thon
The Rebellion
Goblin Nation
The Crown and the Sword
Sacred Fire
Amber and Iron
Empire of Blood
The Fire Rose
The Minotaur Wars
Return of the Exile
Night of Blood
Flight of the Fallen
The Secret of Pax Tharkas
The Wizard's Fate
City of the Lost
The Golden Orb
Winterheim
Stormblade
A Warrior's Journey
Amber and Blood
Fate of Thorbardin
Hair of Kayolin


So, without counting the young reader novels, I still get to 150+ unique books in the series.
 

Azzy

Explorer
Alright, I finished my inventory and here are the results. Books still missing from my photo:
So, without counting the young reader novels, I still get to 150+ unique books in the series.
I mean this in the most positive and friendly way, but... You're a geek. :D
 

PabloM

Explorer
I would add the only caveat being the original Dragonlance novels, because there's no other books I've ever read that reads so much like an actual D&D adventure with somewhat uncooperative players. Just read them for nostalgia, and then make the setting your own, in other words.
Hahahaha. The setting is fine, it´s another calssic vanilla and tolkienesque fantasy setting.
 

tglassy

Explorer
I always liked how magic worked. Red, black and white wizards, each devoted to a different god. Just something I thought was unique.
 
Hahahaha. The setting is fine, it´s another classic vanilla and tolkienesque fantasy setting.
Is it really "vanilla"? Sure, it's pseudo-medieval fantasy, but it has dragons you can ride. That was a significant difference from Greyhawk, Forgotten Realms, Tolkien, et al., to me.
 

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