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D&D General Drow in early D&D


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Wolf72

Explorer
Their "weak fighter" status kinda fell with the 1e UA ...maybe when compared to Humans, but they blew other elves out of the water until other elves' strength increased significantly.
 


Wolf72

Explorer
Back in the day ... there were High Elves, Grey Elves (haughtier), Wood Elves (the rustic ones), Aquatic Elves, and Dark Elves (the evil ones). I think there's a correlation between the types of Elves from Middle Earth (but I butcher the names all the time). Grey Elves where the like the nobler-noble type elf.

Grey Elves are Faeries -- Orc Vandalism
 


Omand

Adventurer
What the heck is a "Grey Elf"?
Well, a bit of the Tolkien influence on D&D, not that there is any you know. ;)

I don't have my old books with me for the exact description, but basically a second type of "high" elf.

Tolkien had High Elves, Grey Elves, and Green/Wood Elves in his works, the terms were pulled pretty closely into D&D.

Cheers :)

<And ninja'd twice>
 


Parmandur

Legend
What the heck is a "Grey Elf"?
In Middle Earth, they are the Telari who started on the journey West but stopped before crossing the Sea (Legolas and Mirkwood being the primary example).

In Greyhawk, they are reclusive and Fey Montain Elves. In 5E, they are called out as Hifh Elves in the PHB. I think Sun Elves in FR are the equivalent, but maybe less associated with Mointain enclaves.
 


Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
On a similar note, a friend of mine and I were talking about D&D at work when another coworker (who doesn't play D&D) overheard our conversation and asked what a "halfling" was. I told him, "it's a hobbit with the serial numbers filed off."

Johnathan
Pretty sure the term is actually used in LotR. Can’t remember by who though. Saruman? Eomer? Dunno!
 

Omand

Adventurer
Pretty sure the term is actually used in LotR. Can’t remember by who though. Saruman? Eomer? Dunno!
Used in the novels a few times by several characters (don't ask me who at the moment). In fact, I am pretty sure that halfling is used instead of Hobbit in at least one of the foretellings of the doom of the ring. In the movies I think it is only used once.

Cheers :)
 

Tonguez

A suffusion of yellow
What the heck is a "Grey Elf"?
Thats what Humans called Moon Elfs, which were a type of High Elf/Eladrin

Apparently GGygax pulled Dark Elfs directly from Norse Döckálfar but used the Shetland dialect Dtrow for the name

From Fairy Mythology, Thomas Keightley (1828)
Döckálfar (Dark Alfs) dwell below under ground, and are unlike them [Light Alfs] in appearance, and still more unlike in actions. The Liosálfar are whiter than the sun in appearance, but the Döckálfar are blacker than pitch."
 
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Alzrius

The EN World kitten
Used in the novels a few times by several characters (don't ask me who at the moment). In fact, I am pretty sure that halfling is used instead of Hobbit in at least one of the foretellings of the doom of the ring. In the movies I think it is only used once.
Well, more than just once.


All joking aside, the term is used several times throughout the films. When Treebeard thinks that Merry and Pippin might be little orcs, they protest "we're hobbits! Halflings!" Likewise, we see Saruman telling the uruk-hai in the above clip that "one of the halflings carries something of great value." I'm sure there are more.
 

Omand

Adventurer
Well, more than just once.


All joking aside, the term is used several times throughout the films. When Treebeard thinks that Merry and Pippin might be little orcs, they protest "we're hobbits! Halflings!" Likewise, we see Saruman telling the uruk-hai in the above clip that "one of the halflings carries something of great value." I'm sure there are more.
Thanks. I have not watched the films is some time, so my memory was foggy.

Cheers :)
 

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