[FATE] Guardian Chronicles: A Superhero Campaign Concept

Knightfall

World of Kulan DM
I will point out that a PL 12 "Normal" (i.e. un-powered) person is as dangerously capable as any PL 12 powered person, up to and including being able to take down powered people within a couple PLs of him. It takes some skill to build a character that can do that, and even more skill to play him so that he does it, but it is very, very possible.
An opposite-end example would be a modern research think-tank. The kinds of guys that spend 20 years figuring out a single technology that revolutionizes the world. Five man team, four PL 1 reasearch scientists (6 ranks, 14 or 15 Intelligence, 1 Teamwork feat each), and one PL 5 team leader (10 ranks, 16 or 17 Intelligence). On average they'll get a 46~ish result after 20 years of research, making one nearly-impossible discovery that revolutionizes the world. This is the sort of thing normals can do at relatively low levels of skill and training (four trained professionals and one acknowledged expert).
A single PL 10 super-scientist can have a +30 on his skill check, doing research of the same quality in one check. If he spends the same kind of focus on it as the team, or is extremely lucky, he can make discoveries that should be impossible (DC 50) and unlock technologies or knowledge that is a century or more ahead of the times. This is what is possible by a single master in the field with one of the highest super-human intelligences.
Normals are capable and competative, especially with the incentives of semi-deities flying around.
Thanks for the information. I'm just about to delve into the Powers chapter for the first time. (I like to read game books from cover to cover, so I just finished the Feats chapter.)

It sounds like I might need to set a much lower Power Level for the 2nd C than I had originally intended. I'll know more as I continue to learn the game system.

As for the suits, whatever doesn't break your suspension of disbelief, man. I've got nothing against dudes in relatively simple servo-suits at even current technologies.
With the right incentives and researchers, I can totally accept guys in pretty advanced power-armor flying about and kicking butt, within the next 10 to 15 years of technology. Sooner if you limit them to ground-systems and allow for increased sizes (BattleTech Mechs, anyone?).
Mecha will definitely have a place in the Guardian Chronicles. I could see ground based mecha being possible by 2025 but flight-based mecha (and powersuits) will take a lot longer to develop for this campaign concept.

I guess I'll be limiting the amount of super science that gets developed. Certain feats and powers might not even be available until the 3rd C begins. Once I've read through the Powers, I'll start deciding which powers will require Descriptors.
 

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Knightfall

World of Kulan DM
The Third Chronicle
The Third Chronicle officially begins in the year 2200 with the formation of the World Union Alliance, which replaces the United Nations. (The UN fell apart during the Third World War.)

The World Union Alliance (WUA) is a more powerful world government with the ability to step in anywhere to quash injustice and human rights violations. It is considered to have jurisdiction over all world issues including all conflicts that involve two or more countries, environmental disasters, genocide, mutation, religious freedom, space exploration (including terraforming), super beings, world-changing technologies (i.e. super soldier projects), xenoform threats, etc.

The World Union Alliance would form many planetary agencies to protect Guardian Earth and the solar system. The most powerful of these agencies is First Defense.

First Defense
Some of the most important Third Chronicle heroes are part of an elite superhero team known as First Defense. It is responsible for the defense of the WUA and its holdings throughout the solar system. First Defense is the superhero division of Department 7 (borrowed from d20 Modern), a black ops military agency that was created by the WUA in 2225 after the world's leaders discover the existence of Watchdog Station built by the First Guardian who had died defending the Earth from an alien interloper.

This First Guardian (i.e. Darkstar) recorded a message detailing the existence of the evil force known throughout the universe for its destructive influence and incorporeal nature. The Darkness, as he called it, enslaved entire species, bending them to its awful will. The alien interloper had been a member of one of these servant species. Darkstar told them of the great gift (or curse, depending on one's point-of-view) that had been passed to humanity through the will of a conclave of Predecessors, the previous species to wear the mantle of Guardians of Creation.

The Predecessors had not only passed humanity the Energy but also a great deal of the technical knowledge of the all the previous Guardian species. This knowledge would usually lay dormant in the DNA of all those touched by the Energy, but it could manifest in individuals as flashes of technological insight.

Darkstar built Watchdog Station to store as much of the technological information that he had gained as he could and created a powerful AI to run the station after his death, which he had known would happen. The AI, called Watchdog, contained part of the First Guardian’s knowledge and experiences as well. It and its robotic entities stood to defend the Earth from The Darkness.

The First Guardian's message suggested the formation of First Defense and that such a force would be needed within 100 to 200 years, minimum. The creation of First Defense only came about after a heated debate as to whether or not the First Guardian had spoken the truth or if it was a trick by some unknown alien force. (Darkstar hadn't been popular with the world leaders of the late 20th Century.)

It took nearly 75 years to bring the countries of the world together to form First Defense and another 75 years to decipher the key knowledge required to create the process of genetic manipulation without the risks of the super soldier experiments of the late 20th (and early 21st) Century, which had obviously been flashes of insight gained by scientists by who were (unbenost to them) touched by the Energy.

Department 7 was given control of Watchdog Station and the organization has uncovered that agents of The Darkness have already found their way to Earth. These agents sow the seeds of dissent in the WUA, civilian organizations around the world, and throughout the solar system.

The colonies on Mars are particularly hard pressed as are the mining facilities orbiting Jupiter and Saturn. Clandestine raiders attack convoys and patrols out of the asteroid field; although, not all of these raiders are under the sway of The Darkness. Spies, saboteurs, assassins, and super powered minions are causing problems from one end of the solar system to the other.

The year is 2375.
 
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Knightfall

World of Kulan DM
Main Characters of the Third Chronicle
Most Guardian Earth heroes are considered enhanced humans due to genetic engineering (controlled mutations), and many of its heroes are also superheroes. In truth, the superpowers come from the Energy that integrated itself into the life force of the planet.

William Aguilar
Code Name: Darkstar
Country: Spain
Hometown: Toledo
Powers: 5 to 8
Mutations: None
Psionics: Yes

Quote: “Get the hell out of my way, I have a war against evil to win!”

Background: When the WUA finally agreed to form First Defense, they decided to honor the First Guardian by assuring that there would always be a Guardian with the code name of Darkstar. It was also decided that the first person to be given that code name was to be from Europe, where the First Guardian was considered a hero. The WUA, since its inception, has always had to worry about terrorist attacks from radical extremists, and it was a Spanish soldier in the Army of the European Union (AEU) that saved the President of the WUA from a suicide bomber.

This hero was William Aguilar, who would become the next Darkstar.

William is a 2nd generation Spaniard whose family came across the Atlantic from Canada during the Exodus. His grandfather wished to escape the increasingly fast paced life taking over the North American continent and decided to settle in Spain. William's father married a local girl and William was the result. His parents died when he was very young, and he inherited the small estate his father had purchased. He spent his youth learning academics and playing football and was considered the best striker on his team. Many thought he would go pro.

However, William instead decided to join the AEU on his 21st birthday. He served the European Union both on Earth as well as throughout the solar system. Saving the President of the WUA hadn’t been a big deal to him. It was part of his job. However, when asked to join First Defense to become the next Darkstar, he couldn’t refuse. He takes his job as a Guardian very seriously, almost too seriously. He considers being given the code name Darkstar to be a great honor and an even greater responsibility. So much so that he tends to be moody and temperamental.

Michael Starter
Code Name: Ironhawk
Country: USA
Hometown: Denver, Colorado
Powers: 1
Mutations: 3
Tech: 1

Quote: Response to above... “You need to learn how to relax. If it were up to you these aliens would attack tomorrow. You really need to learn how to relax... here, have a beer.”

Background: A veteran of the Central American War that freed Central America from fascist tyranny in 2370, Michael Starter is easy going and is happiest when he has his buddies around him and the game is on. However, when in combat he is as serious as they come. As Ironhawk, he is the consummate leader on the battlefield and there is little that his enhanced strength and constitution can’t handle. He is charismatic but a little naive about the state of the world. He has a tendency to not be able to see the big picture.

Michael knows William means well but he believes that the Guardians will need to fight with guts and determination, not unbridled emotions, when The Darkness comes. That's why Ironhawk leads the core group of Guardians and Darkstar doesn't. At least, that is what the leaders of Department 7 would have him believe. In truth, Ironhawk only leads the Guardians on the battlefield and, even then, only on Earth. (Darkstar has more support amongst the colonies of the Solar Union, which is a member of the WUA.)

Denise Conroy
Code Name: Firestorm
Country: England
Hometown: London
Powers: 2
Mutation: 3; must have a flight mutation.

Quote: “I can fly... can you?”

Background: Young, attractive, punk rock listening, bantam starload firing, kick your ass if you piss her off, British woman. That's how Denise Conroy describes herself to those who only see the woman and not the Guardian. Denise believes that either she should be second-in-command of the Guardians or that William should listen to her more.

However, she doesn't hate him –– she's just a little worried that when The Darkness arrives he might get the bulk of the First Defense force killed. She recognizes that he has abilities that she and the other members of First Defense could only dream of. Yet, she believes he is not commander material and too hotheaded. Of course, many would say the same thing about her, just not to her face.
 

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Knightfall

World of Kulan DM
Other Characters of the Third Chronicle
Below are a few other character ideas that could be fleshed out into full-blown Guardian Earth heroes. Most are designed to be members of First Defense. Other futuristic character archetypes also fit well into a Guardian Earth campaign.

Akiyo Hasimoto
Code Name: Samurai
Country: Japan
Tech: 1d3+1
Powers: 1d4-1

Chow Su Lee
Code Name: Shogun
Country: China
Powers: 1d6
Mutations: 1d8

William S. Baker
Code Name: Ice Dog
Country: Canada
Powers: 1d3+1
Mutations: 1d8

Christina Tyler *
Code Name: Hunter
Country: New Britain, Mars Colony
Tech: 1d4+1
Mutations: 1d3

Teresa Demengez
Code Name: Thunderwing
Country: USA (New Mexican States)
Powers: 1d3+1
Mutations: 1d4+1

Jason Tyler *
Code Name: Striker
Country: New Britain, Mars Colony
Tech: 1d3+2
Mutations: 1d8

Joseph Moreau
Code Name: Legionnaire
Country: France
Tech: 1d3
Mutations: 1d6-1

Anthony Chase
Code Name: Hotoru
Country: USA (Native American)
Mutations: 1d6
Psionics: Yes

Marco Toctemos
Code Name: Quetzalcoatl
Country: USA (New Mexican States)
Tech: 1
Mutations: 1d8

Jasper Hardtack
Code Name: None
Country: NA, resident of Thunder Station orbiting Jupiter
Tech: 1d4+1
Powers: 1 (dormant)
Psionics: Yes
Note: Not a member of First Defense

Said El Boussaïd
Code Name: Red Angel
Country: Morocco
Tech: 1d3+1
Mutations: 1d6

* Brother and sister
 

ValhallaGH

First Post
I'm glad that my comments have actually been helpful.
Once I've read through the Powers, I'll start deciding which powers will require Descriptors.
Let me give you more benefit of my M&M experience: All powers should require descriptors.
Or did you mean that you'll have certain powers that only have very specific descriptors? If that's what you meant then you'll be changing that eventually. Someone will come to you with a cool concept that wants to do a strange thing best modeled with power X, which you've decreed to have descriptor B. However, descriptor B makes no sense given what he wants to do with the power, so you'll have to make an exception.
Short version: don't pigeon-hole powers with required descriptors.

I'll read the Third Chronicle when I get some more time.
 

Knightfall

World of Kulan DM
Let me give you more benefit of my M&M experience: All powers should require descriptors.
Or did you mean that you'll have certain powers that only have very specific descriptors? If that's what you meant then you'll be changing that eventually. Someone will come to you with a cool concept that wants to do a strange thing best modeled with power X, which you've decreed to have descriptor B. However, descriptor B makes no sense given what he wants to do with the power, so you'll have to make an exception.
Short version: don't pigeon-hole powers with required descriptors.
I meant that certain powers will only have certain descriptors. Wall-Crawling, for example, will definitely fall into the mutant category. I see certain powers as being more rigidly defined but there will likely be some crossover (i.e. flight).

Yet, I'll likely allow for some flexiblity. I don't know yet.

On a side note, Energy and Darkness "powers" WILL be more powerful than Mutant "powers." I haven't decided exactly how this will work, but I'm thinking that Mutant powers likely won't scale the same way depending on the Power Level of a particular campaign.

For example, in a PL 12 campaign, Mutant powers could only be raised as high as 6 (or maybe 9) while Energy and Darkness powers could reach 12 for heroes. NPCs will work differently but there will still be restrictions on how powerful mutants can be. (Some tech-based powers will likely have this restriction too. It's all still all a work in progress, however.)

Mutants are the poor man's hero for this campaign concept. They don't get as much respect unless they work for Department 7 and/or First Defense. Other mutants tend to be mercenaries. However, mutants that also have Energy "powers" usually have more respect from their peers while those that also have Darkness "powers" are distrusted and/or feared.
 

ValhallaGH

First Post
I'll likely allow for some flexiblity.
I'd suggest a blanket "These powers generally have the Mutation descriptor. These generally have the Technological descriptor. These generally have Energy/Darkness as a descriptor. Talk to me about anything unusual you want to do with your powers." That "generally" allows you to slip in the occasional mutant or techie with a power normally only available to energy/darkness and vice versa. Whether as NPCs or PCs.
On a side note, Energy and Darkness "powers" WILL be more powerful than Mutant "powers." I haven't decided exactly how this will work, but I'm thinking that Mutant powers likely won't scale the same way depending on the Power Level of a particular campaign.

For example, in a PL 12 campaign, Mutant powers could only be raised as high as 6 (or maybe 9) while Energy and Darkness powers could reach 12 for heroes. NPCs will work differently but there will still be restrictions on how powerful mutants can be. (Some tech-based powers will likely have this restriction too. It's all still all a work in progress, however.)
That's just about the best way to handle it, given what you want.

Do keep in mind that with Attack/Damage trade-offs, and (to a lesser extent) Defense/Toughness trade-offs (assuming you allow them), it is entirely possible that a PL 12 character could have a rank 14 or 16 power. I actually prefer that sort of thing to happen, before there end up being too many Expert or Master combatants among the powered population.

Still, restricting powers with a Mutant descriptor to PL - 2 ranks or PL -4 ranks (or whatever) is a great way to make mutant powers feel like "tricks", or to make them more of a clever-usage thing. Mutants can be really, really effective as long as they use their powers well.

Oh! Keep an eye on power stunts and alternate powers, when you get to them. They're a way for a guy with "one power" to have a nearly infinite set of powers by using his one power creatively. I have no idea if you'll like them or hate them (I love them) but they might mess with your perspective(s) about powered-people.
An example would be a Cyclops (X-Men) style character. His basic power is an optic blast (mutant and energy descriptors). However, he's got a cone area blast, he might have a radiation blast, he's certainly got a Deflect or ranged Deflect in that array of power, a 'focused' penetrating blast, and probably a few other tricks he's used (I know he used a "slow fall" effect once). A character with "one power" who's M&M sheet probably has 10 or more powers.


Some tasty food for thought, I hope.
 

Knightfall

World of Kulan DM
I'd suggest a blanket "These powers generally have the Mutation descriptor. These generally have the Technological descriptor. These generally have Energy/Darkness as a descriptor. Talk to me about anything unusual you want to do with your powers." That "generally" allows you to slip in the occasional mutant or techie with a power normally only available to energy/darkness and vice versa. Whether as NPCs or PCs.
That's the general plan. Yet, any powers that I designate as Darkness powers likely won't be available as Energy powers and vice versa. They will be available as Mutant and/or Tech powers, however.

That's just about the best way to handle it, given what you want.

Do keep in mind that with Attack/Damage trade-offs, and (to a lesser extent) Defense/Toughness trade-offs (assuming you allow them), it is entirely possible that a PL 12 character could have a rank 14 or 16 power. I actually prefer that sort of thing to happen, before there end up being too many Expert or Master combatants among the powered population.

Still, restricting powers with a Mutant descriptor to PL - 2 ranks or PL -4 ranks (or whatever) is a great way to make mutant powers feel like "tricks", or to make them more of a clever-usage thing. Mutants can be really, really effective as long as they use their powers well.
I am keeping that in mind.

Since there has been a dropoff in superpowered characters (after the end of the 2nd C), an initial 3rd C campaign would likely start at PL 10 and the world's PL would increase by 1 for every 10 years that pass. So, mutant powers would start out with a maximum PL - 5 ranks (without trade-offs). Tech levels would likely be higher (PL - 8 to 10 ranks depending on what it is).

Darkness and Energy powers would max out at PL - 10 ranks (without trade-offs). However, Darkness powers can go higher if a character is truly willing to be "EVIL." Truly vicious acts will allow a Darkness-based character to boost his/her PL for short periods and the more Darkness powers that he/she uncovers, the higher his/her max PL ranks can be. (I'm thinking +1 per 5 "unique" Darkness powers possesed but that might be too generous.)

This would be that corruption factor you pointed out eariler. Corruption = bad, BUT corruption = power.

The three main NPC characters detailed above would start out higher. Darkstar and Ironhawk would likely be PL 14 characters while Firestorm would be a PL 12 character. I don't have any specific ideas about the other characters as they would be available to players to detail and use.

Oh! Keep an eye on power stunts and alternate powers, when you get to them. They're a way for a guy with "one power" to have a nearly infinite set of powers by using his one power creatively. I have no idea if you'll like them or hate them (I love them) but they might mess with your perspective(s) about powered-people.
An example would be a Cyclops (X-Men) style character. His basic power is an optic blast (mutant and energy descriptors). However, he's got a cone area blast, he might have a radiation blast, he's certainly got a Deflect or ranged Deflect in that array of power, a 'focused' penetrating blast, and probably a few other tricks he's used (I know he used a "slow fall" effect once). A character with "one power" who's M&M sheet probably has 10 or more powers.
Interesting. Power stunts sound like something I'll like.

Some tasty food for thought, I hope.
Thanks for the ideas.
 

Knightfall

World of Kulan DM
D&D/D20 Modern Aliens for use in the Guardian Chronicles

D&D Monster Manual
D20 Menace Manual
  • Gardhyi (Darkness servant race)
  • Kinori (alternate/hidden Earth-based race; can be rivals or allies of to humanity)
  • Kroath (possible Darkness allied race)
  • Mothfolk
  • Star Doppelganger (possible Darkness-corrupted creature)
  • Zeikune (possible Darkness allied race)
D20 Future
  • Aleerin (Mechalus)
  • Dralasite
  • Fraal (former Guardian race; in decline)
  • Sesheyan (Darkness slave race)
  • T'sa (possible Guardian Earth allied race)
  • Vrusk
  • Weren
  • Yazirian (possible Guardian Earth allied race)
D20 Future Web Enhancement
  • Dhamrin (slave race of the Medurr)
  • Medurr
  • Sathar (possible Darkness allied race)
 
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ValhallaGH

First Post
I like your ideas for Darkness. It sounds like guys who want to abuse their Darkness powers will have lots of free uses of extra effort (check out the pink section of the book) to increase their power ranks by 2. That's all kinds of tempting. }:D


A note on PLs. This is probably the hardest concept to understand for people new to the system; I know it took a while for me to get the scale down, and I know at least one guy who tried running a campaign last year and still hasn't figured it out.
If the following isn't helpful, it was the equipment section that finally gave me the scale. 250 lbs of TNT, skillfully bundled together, is +12 damage (explosion area). The 16 inch guns on a battleship dealt +13 damage (explosion area). A modern main battle tank (like the M1 Abrams) has a +12 toughness with 6 impervious, allowing it to ignore hand grenades and most personal weapons, and giving a good resistance to the main guns of other tanks (+10 damage). With my background I found all that most instructive.
That and the Skill Benchmarks on page 38.

PL 0 - average person on the street. Some professional training (a skill or two at rank 1 to 5), but no combat ability and average overall ability scores. Your basic Innocent Bystander and conveniently labelled as such in the back of the book (blue NPCs section).

PL 5 - average professional infantry soldier. Well trained and equiped, with a broad group of skills focused on combat, survival, and movement. Take the Soldier archetype in the back and give him a few more skills at 1 to 4 ranks to represent training in things like swimming, driving, stealth, or land navigation (survival).

PL 6 to 8 - most military special forces. U.S. Navy SEALs, Green Berets, CSOR, SAS, Mossad and other elite units would fall into this range. With the right equipment and a good plan, they can take down almost any target, though they're still very human (and extremely vulnerable if caught by surprise).
Also, most Luthor-like villains (brilliant, evil billionaires) would fit into this range due to their skill ranks (and possibly personalized martial arts training).

PL 7 to 9 - most starting super heroes. Enough power to shake a city, but without the experience and skill to really change it. However, the potential is all there.

PL 10 - veteran super heroes that have a couple years of experience and have probably saved the city or world a couple of times. By this point they should have a nemesis, a fan base (even if a small one), or a growing urban legend "known" to be true by the residents of their favored neighborhoods. Some rookies start here, but they tend to be incredibly powerful, able to melt tanks with no effort and possibly by accident.

PL 12 - this is probably the level I'd place the veterans of the Avengers at. Most heroes won't go past this PL and very few of them ever should. At this point, a single character should be a viable threat to an entire country, assuming that his power set allows him to be threatening.
Normals really shouldn't go past this point, as training and experience can only do so much.

PL 15 - the demi-gods of super-dom, this level is generally reserved for those few individuals (hero or villain) that change the world just by existing. At this point, a hero can be so talented that their ability is measured on a cosmic scale. Superman, Shazam, Thanos, occasionally Thor, and others of a power that rivals gods.
Heck, Freedom City has the Greek diety Hades at this level and he works perfectly.

PL 16+ - that handful of characters that alter all of reality. A creature that can personally kill an entire city in an hour or so, before sweeping across the rest of the planet. An inter-stellar conqueror, leader of a warband composed of half a galaxy, and personal champion of his own nigh-endless hordes. The interdimensional ruler-invader that could decide to unmake the universe the heroes are in, if they annoy him enough. That kind of guy.
 

Knightfall

World of Kulan DM
I like your ideas for Darkness. It sounds like guys who want to abuse their Darkness powers will have lots of free uses of extra effort (check out the pink section of the book) to increase their power ranks by 2. That's all kinds of tempting. }:D
Yep. Being tempted will be a big problem for heroes with Darkness powers. A villain likely won't care unless he/she is the type of bad guy that like to remain in control of his/her abilities and not the other way around.

Mutants will have to worry about this too if they have been touched by Darkness, but it won't be as big a problem for them. A mutant that reaches into themselves to tap the Darkness can enhance their mutant abilities for short periods but it cost them part of their sanity/soul.

Mutants and superheroes touched by the Energy don't have to worry about this unless they've also been touched by the Darkness. (A very rare thing.) Such a hero that falls from grace would become the wickedest villain. Aliens would be the most likely characters to be touched by both the Energy and the Darkness (i.e. fraal or sesheyans).

And thanks for the PL guideline. That definitely helps.
 

Knightfall

World of Kulan DM
While scouring The Atomic Think Tank messageboard, I've come across the idea of racial templates. I'm curious to find out whether or not other "races" besides humans are usually created in that manner. Or is it more of a choice?

If it's the former, then I'll need to build some racial templates for the Guardian Chronicles based on the various d20 Modern/d20 Future species once I've learned more about the system.
 

ValhallaGH

First Post
Generally, all races are a template, a set of adjustments, feats, and powers that represent the typical member of that race, and can be added to any base character to make him a member of that race.

I put an example on your conversion thread. They're pretty useful for saying "this is how a bystander of these people is different from a bystander human".
 

Knightfall

World of Kulan DM
Generally, all races are a template, a set of adjustments, feats, and powers that represent the typical member of that race, and can be added to any base character to make him a member of that race.
Interesting... that's a good way to do it. I like templates.

I put an example on your conversion thread. They're pretty useful for saying "this is how a bystander of these people is different from a bystander human".
Thanks for that. I'll be getting some good use out of it.
 
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Knightfall

World of Kulan DM
I've been too busy with night class school work to have the time to post anything new here or even read my M&M, 2nd Edition book. :p Anyway, next up for this thread will be the Major Secret for the Third Chronicle. I have to rewrite it a bit first, however.
 


Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
I'm a little puzzled- in which era will players be starting?

I ask because the best game I ever ran was a supers game (using the HERO RPG) set in 1900. If the 19th Century is going to be a major campaign era, I may be able to help you.

For the record, I used the background info from Space:1889 as my launching point, since that game's creators did an excellent job of synthesizing the relevant fiction- mainly Verne and Wells- into their RPG. Then I added other elements, like what a few supers might do among the downtrodden peoples (Blacks/Africans, Native Americans, the Chinese, Martians and their sympathizers) in an era of imperialism, a little James Bond and Wild, Wild West, to name a few.

The timing of the event could even be significant- remember, the era we think of as the "wild West" occurred around the time of the California Gold Rush (the Aussie Gold rush as well, FWIW), the American Civil War, and only a few decades after the USMC helped end the threat of Barbary Pirates on American shipping (their actions in these wars led to the line "to the shores of Tripoli" in the opening of the Marine Hymn). The interjection of supers into that time period could have a radical effect on the appearance of the world in latter eras.
 

Knightfall

World of Kulan DM
I'm a little puzzled- in which era will players be starting?

I ask because the best game I ever ran was a supers game (using the HERO RPG) set in 1900. If the 19th Century is going to be a major campaign era, I may be able to help you.
More than likely, any campaign run in this setting will be played as part of the Third Chronicle (future era) but there will likely be some time traveling aspects thrown in.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
With that setup, you probably don't need much more than what I suggested above, then, other than for me to add that I also used elements from great period detective stories like those featuring Sherlock Holmes, Hercule Poirot or

However, you should plan your past adventures very carefully, and give your parties VERY vivid locales in which to adventure.

The British Museum, The Louvre, The Smithsonian, The Vatican or the Hermitage are so huge and full of STUFF that they make great sites for adventures. Their size is part of their charm for a DM- lots of space in which to run an adventure, and lots of things that could be a "McGuffin" that the PCs of the Future might be trying to recover. Especially if disguised/hidden in plain sight.

In that first era, locales like the Pyramids and the Acropolis are crawling with archaeologists and wealthy tourists. Its still possible to go big game hunting in Africa or India. America's "Wild West" isn't completely tamed. Mythic locales like Atlantis, Mu, and Lemuria are actively being searched for.

Vehicles like The Orient Express, The Queen Mary or The Titanic could be sites for adventuring.
 

Knightfall

World of Kulan DM
With that setup, you probably don't need much more than what I suggested above, then, other than for me to add that I also used elements from great period detective stories like those featuring Sherlock Holmes, Hercule Poirot or

However, you should plan your past adventures very carefully, and give your parties VERY vivid locales in which to adventure.

The British Museum, The Louvre, The Smithsonian, The Vatican or the Hermitage are so huge and full of STUFF that they make great sites for adventures. Their size is part of their charm for a DM- lots of space in which to run an adventure, and lots of things that could be a "McGuffin" that the PCs of the Future might be trying to recover. Especially if disguised/hidden in plain sight.
One of the things that makes me wary about modern roleplaying is that I haven't seen very many famous locales. I worry that I won't be able to make such locations seem VIVID. Pictures and descriptions of such places don't always tell the full story.

In that first era, locales like the Pyramids and the Acropolis are crawling with archaeologists and wealthy tourists. Its still possible to go big game hunting in Africa or India. America's "Wild West" isn't completely tamed. Mythic locales like Atlantis, Mu, and Lemuria are actively being searched for.

Vehicles like The Orient Express, The Queen Mary or The Titanic could be sites for adventuring.
All good suggestions.
 

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