D&D 5E February's Keys from the Golden Vault Appears on Amazon

Announced in August, along with the rest of 2023's D&D lineup, Keys from the Golden Vault -- an anthology of adventures with a 'heist' theme -- has appeared on Amazon with a release date of Frebruary 21, 2023. The entry indicates that the book is 208 pages long.

"Greetings, adventurer. You’ve snuck in and found a wondrous treasure! Keys From the Golden Vault is a Dungeons & Dragons adventure anthology with a heist at the center of every tale. Nothing else is yet known about the contents of this tome, but keep an eye on your favorite D&D news sources for your first sneak peek inside."

So far, it only has the now-familiar D&D preview image, so we should expect a cover reveal in the coming weeks.


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Ghal Maraz

Adventurer
"Heist mechanics" are great but hardly necessary.
Well, let's just completely exclude mechanics from RPGs, then.
There's actually a reason Blades in the Dark and the Leverage RPG has been well regarded and are influential. The same goes for the GUMSHOE system and the investigation mechanic.
D&D doesn't certainly support heist (or investigation) mechanics particularly well: you can do them, but they won't shine.
 

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Alby87

Explorer
That doesn't make any sense to me. High level stuff will exacerbate small differences between 5E and 1D&D. It's like a change in angle: close to the origin it is hard to see the difference but the farther out you get the bigger to measured distance.
I think that high level stuff mechanics is not so connected to high level characters: dominion management, warfare, mass combat, strongholds and so on (that are NOT confirmed anywhere) takes from some character statistics, the one I think will be retrocompatible: they are subsystem, not some system like combat or skill system.
The Planescape book (and this exists and should really work on high levels) will present monsters and planes description. Not totally rules-indipendent, but not so entangled with the minutiae OneD&D will change. And, I hope, the really important minutiae like the ones that in the playtest are glossary (fatigue, critical rules, feat at the start) should be already locked in, starting balancing the math and not the rules, by the time the two books are finalized.
 

Reynard

Legend
Well, let's just completely exclude mechanics from RPGs, then.
Ah, yes, the excluded middle.
There's actually a reason Blades in the Dark and the Leverage RPG has been well regarded and are influential. The same goes for the GUMSHOE system and the investigation mechanic.
I mean, I didn't say they weren't great. I might have even said the opposite.
D&D doesn't certainly support heist (or investigation) mechanics particularly well: you can do them, but they won't shine.
They will if the GM embraces the genre and runs the game intentionally.
 

For me I'll wait and see if Planescape is as bad as Spelljammer.

The Deck of Many Things book I need actual info on, like I know it's got some Player mechanics, but WTF is it otherwise?

Giants book might be good, but most likely a rehash of the 2E "FR Giant Craft?" ICR the name exactly. Deck of Many Things Book and Phandelver Campaign I may spring for. You are correct that we need more info.

I've bought many of WotC adventures for 5E. I've mined bits and pieces from most, but never ran one. The adventure path/compendium in hardcover format really "BLEEPS" me off. Throw us a 16-32 pg softcover module here and there.
 


Ghal Maraz

Adventurer
Ah, yes, the excluded middle.

I mean, I didn't say they weren't great. I might have even said the opposite.

They will if the GM embraces the genre and runs the game intentionally.
And that could be said for almost any game. But D&D doesn't model heist in any way, mechanically speaking. It simply becomes a matter of playstyle.

In which case, I prefer a game that gives me the instruments to play on the strengths of the heist.
 




Reynard

Legend
And that could be said for almost any game. But D&D doesn't model heist in any way, mechanically speaking. It simply becomes a matter of playstyle.

In which case, I prefer a game that gives me the instruments to play on the strengths of the heist.
I actually think there's an interesting discussion to be had about this, so I started a new thread on the topic.
 



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