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Find inspiration everywhere! Martin found it in History, I do in Philosophy.

Madnick

Explorer
Exploring our worlds history, mythology and philosophy a Game Master can be inspired to create amazing little hooks for his players. Now that I get older I am finding that reading something to be inspired as a Game Master makes me want to read more, expand my horizons in the aforementioned fields. That would be a surprise to the 15 year old me when I created my first 18^00 Str Barbarian 20 some years ago.

Here I am showcasing Plato's Theory of Forms, which I used to create the multiverse in my home brew world. Along with his Allegory of the Cave, I have the foundation to propel my players to plane travel with ease and depth that I could never have done with out Plato :)

After all what do you need for plane hopping? Four planes is great start :)


 

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Fenris-77

Small God of the Dozens
I have a lot of love for R. Scott Bakker's Prince of Nothing series specifically (but not entirely) because of how much that fantasy setting and especially the magic system therein is obviously influenced by his professional work on Theory of Mind and associated cog-sci stuff.
 

Voadam

Legend
Since in a lot of D&D editions the summon monster spells create temporary generic magical versions of monsters on the spot instead of summoning specific individuals, I analogized it to tapping into Plato's Forms which I feel works well conceptually.
 

pemerton

Legend
Since in a lot of D&D editions the summon monster spells create temporary generic magical versions of monsters on the spot instead of summoning specific individuals, I analogized it to tapping into Plato's Forms which I feel works well conceptually.
Per Plato, any instance of an X is a (fallen, imperfect) copy of the form of X.

If a wizards casts a spell that creates an X, and again if we take Plato's metaphysics as given, then that magical creation is a (fallen, imperfect) copy of the form of X. It's not going to be more or less generic than any other X that actually exists in the world.
 

Madnick

Explorer
That's why I love tapping into philosophy and stealing ideas for my worlds, depending your prism you can adjust theories and fit them to your game. I have to say that @Voadam 's take can be easily be interpreted as a fitting logical deduction. Personally I leave the perfect forms of my world to be the actual Gods that created the whole existence in the first place.

So in essence all creatures are born in the world of perfection, hence they experience it, and when/if they derail from that perfection, they are send to the Prime Material plane to atone for their mistakes, in an effort to regain access to the perfect realm.
 

Fenris-77

Small God of the Dozens
The last time I did a cosmology from scratch, my gods were all facets of human culture, or I guess the gods of human civilization building - farming, crafts, hunting, that sort of thing. These were contrasted against the gods of deep wild, or the human attributes that work against civilization - wrath, the wild, plague, etc. Not as good and bad division, just what I thought humans would worship (i.e. themselves mostly).
 

Emerikol

Adventurer
The last time I did a cosmology from scratch, my gods were all facets of human culture, or I guess the gods of human civilization building - farming, crafts, hunting, that sort of thing. These were contrasted against the gods of deep wild, or the human attributes that work against civilization - wrath, the wild, plague, etc. Not as good and bad division, just what I thought humans would worship (i.e. themselves mostly).
This is a pretty cool take on Gods. They kind of write themselves and it makes them a little gray vs obviously black and white.
 

Fenris-77

Small God of the Dozens
This is a pretty cool take on Gods. They kind of write themselves and it makes them a little gray vs obviously black and white.
Yeah, thanks. I was pleased with it. Im also not running just discrete gods, but rather a cosmology where there might be hundreds of aspects of gods, but they all come back to one of the core gods. I wanted to leave some room for creativity when it came to wierd cults and stuff, which is dead easy when you can make up a specific aspect of god to fit what you want.

I also have a little old gods vs new god, sort of like GoT. There are the old gods, the seven of man, but there is also the one, a god of the Sun. Lots of faction infighting and stuff. The whole deal was designed to compliment a sandbox setting where any given campaign can go in different directions in terms of religion.
 
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Emerikol

Adventurer
Yeah, thanks. I was pleased with it. Im also not running discrete gods, but rather a cosmology where there might be hundreds of aspects of gods, but they all come back to one of the core gods. I wanted to leave some room for creativity when it came to wierd cults and stuff, which is dead easy when you can make up a specific aspect of god to fit what you want.

I also have a little old gods vs new god, sort of like GoT. There are the old gods, the seven of man, but there is also the one, a god of the Sun. Lots of faction infighting and stuff. The whole deal was designed to compliment a sandbox setting where any given campaign can go in different directions in terms of religion.
I think religions are one of my favorite things to work on when it comes to a campaign setting. I definitely like to change it up and try new things. The aspects idea is a great one. I discussed a related idea one time with a friend where each civilization had their own gods but they were really just aspects and could be traced back to a core set of Gods. I consider "The Book of the Righteous" one of the best 3e era books written on the subject. I still have it and use it for a reference because much of it is usable even if rules change.

If you like that god themed books, you might like the Rose of the Prophet series. The theory was that Gods grew stronger with more worshipers and weaker with fewer. The premise is the LN god tries to take over everything and ultimately the CN god's followers (the protagonists) have to stop him.
 

Fenris-77

Small God of the Dozens
That's a cool idea. I've always liked the notion of the struggle for worshippers being an actual thing whne worshippers mean power. Very American Gods.
 

I think religions are one of my favorite things to work on when it comes to a campaign setting. I definitely like to change it up and try new things. The aspects idea is a great one. I discussed a related idea one time with a friend where each civilization had their own gods but they were really just aspects and could be traced back to a core set of Gods. I consider "The Book of the Righteous" one of the best 3e era books written on the subject. I still have it and use it for a reference because much of it is usable even if rules change.
Me too! I also have a copy of Mitlanyal, the two books that detail the gods of Order and Change in the Tekumel milieu. Mixing those two have given me a lot of inspiration.
 

Madnick

Explorer
If you like that god themed books, you might like the Rose of the Prophet series. The theory was that Gods grew stronger with more worshipers and weaker with fewer. The premise is the LN god tries to take over everything and ultimately the CN god's followers (the protagonists) have to stop him.
That's what hooked me on 2nd edition dnd, the Time of Troubles fight between Bane and Torm, where Torm pretty much asked from his followers to die voluntarily to absorb their souls and become stronger to deal with Bane in the end, epic scene that directly connects the faith of a god with its power. And obviously the most direct way to kill a God? Leave him with zero followers ! Good stuff!
 

The ZEITGEIST adventure path is motivated by antagonists with strong philosophical views on what the nature of a perfect world is. You at several points get a chance to advance your view, and the various factions of the setting each have their own philosophies.

The most prominent one is eschatology, which frames life in relation to how things end, and encourages people to seek good endings in their affairs, ranging from how to end a job or book or relationship, to how to die and how when the world ought to end.

Naturally, some people take this too literally and start working to ensure the world has a good ending by trying to be the ones to end it. But they're not the main villains.
 

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