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D&D 5E Fizban's Treasury: The Dragon Book Now Has A Description... And A Feat

Courtesy of Amazon, we now have a description for Fizban's Treasury of Dragons, the October D&D hardcover. The book introduces gem dragons, dragon-themed player options, and plenty of draconic lore! This joins September's The Wild Beyond the Witchlight, and November's Strixhaven: Curriculum of Chaos.

At D&D Live this weekend, WotC will be revealing a lot more about all three books. It will be interesting to see if the Dragonlance-themed title means the book has Dragonlance content (I'm hoping for dragonlances and draconians, at least), and whether it settles that old argument of whether Paladine and Takhisis are actually Bahamut and Tiamat, or merely inspired by them.

(Warning: Dragonlance Chronicles spoilers in the cover text, if you haven't read those novels yet!)

fizzy.jpeg



Discover everything there is to know about dragons—the most iconic of D&D monsters—in this quintessential reference guide.

Meet Fizban the Fabulous: doddering archmage, unlikely war hero, divine avatar of a dragon-god—and your guide to the mysteries of dragonkind.

What is the difference between a red dragon and a gold dragon? What is dragonsight? How does a dragon’s magic impact the world around them? This comprehensive guide provides Dungeon Masters with a rich hoard of tools and information for designing dragon-themed encounters, adventures, and campaigns. Dragonslayers and dragon scholars alike will also appreciate its insight into harnessing the power of dragon magic and options for players to create unique, memorable draconic characters.

• Introduces gem dragons to fifth edition!
• Provides Dungeon Masters with tools to craft adventures inspired by dragons, including dragon lair maps and detailed information about 20 different types of dragons
• Adds player character options, including dragon-themed subclasses for monks and rangers, unique draconic ancestries for dragonborn, additional spell options, and a feat
• Presents a complete dragon bestiary and introduces a variety of dragons and dragon-related creatures—including aspects of the dragon gods, dragon minions, and more
• Reveals the story of the First World and the role the dragon gods Bahamut and Tiamat played in its creation and destruction


 
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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

Nefermandias

Adventurer
Fair enough. I might be jumping the gun there after seeing mentions of tons of other things. I'm assuming that we'll get some of the other chromatic and metallic dragons from editions past. I can continue to hope for dragonnes, but I'm not confident on that, just from them having been entirely skipped over in 4E. (kinda the same way I wonder if they had a giant-focused book would, say, athaches show up in that 🤔)
Dragonnes are the mounts of the Knights of Rethmyl in 4e.
 
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Dragonnes are the mounts of the Knights of Rethmyl in 4e.
Oh? Nice! Did they have an actual stat block in a mainline official publication since they didn't show up in either of the Monster Manuals or either of the Draconomicons (other than a brief and incorrect mention of how you could apply the dragon template to a horse in order to create a dragonne)?
 

Nefermandias

Adventurer
Oh? Nice! Did they have an actual stat block in a mainline official publication since they didn't show up in either of the Monster Manuals or either of the Draconomicons (other than a brief and incorrect mention of how you could apply the dragon template to a horse in order to create a dragonne)?
Dragon magazine 405 if I recall correctly.
 


Nefermandias

Adventurer
Oh? Cool! It's unfortunate that the creature didn't get a more "official" and widespread iteration in that edition, though. :\
What you mean "more official"? The bulk of the lore in 4e have been presented in the online Dragon and Dungeon magazine pages. Besides, all the content was available on D&D Insider.
 

What you mean "more official"? The bulk of the lore in 4e have been presented in the online Dragon and Dungeon magazine pages. Besides, all the content was available on D&D Insider.
"Official" isn't the best word (which is why I kept it in quotes :D). The Dragon and Dungeon magazines are definitely official in the truest sense of the word, but I think it's a more limited audience and those sources are more on the obscure side. I think even nowadays, if they published a stat block in their online PDF Dragon+ magazine, I'd say that a stat block from a large third-party publisher like Kobold Press would be more widely disseminated, if that makes any sense.

Put another way... most D&D players now aren't going to realize that there's an official stat block for the neo-otyugh, but even then I suspect it would be more well known than the reference to dragonnes in that issue of Dragon magazine. :)
 


Actually, they appear in 4e. They were just renamed as Liondrakes. See the Threats to the Nentir Vale book.
Nice! I had seen them referred to as liondrakes just recently, but I never thought to try to find statistics under that name. A retail release is definitely better than a stub in an issue of Dragon magazine. I'd say it's a little better than the neo-otyugh example I gave above since it was something that was sold at physical shops, although I'm a little saddened that it seems almost like an afterthought? This was one of the later books they released after the "starter" Essentials books, right around the time they were already starting work on 5E. But it is an official published stat block for sure! :)

Thanks for digging that up! Much obliged!
 

I think another thing that didn't sit well with me was that the way they were positioned and described in the book, it made it seem as if they were just some random mounts that the one specific group used, when dragonnes deserve so much more because they're so cool. <end rant> ;)
 

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