Flying creatures standing up from prone

FreeTheSlaves

Explorer
Narrative:
The Blue Dragon plummeted down from its globe of darkness, broke its fall with a spread of the wings, and unleashed a continuous stroke of lightning - smoking the Fighter, Bard and Paladin.

Mechanics:
Natural flier dropped prone (free downward vertical movement), stood up at altitude 10' (costing half speed), moved, breathed lightning, moved.

Question:
Must standing up from prone require being on the ground?
 
Last edited:

Shiroiken

Adventurer
It's very realistic with flying (as it's much easier to dive than to climb), but I think this might create a balance issue, making flying that much stronger.
 

MarkB

Hero
This is answered in Xanathar's. A flying creature falls 500 feet (optionally reduced by its flying speed). If it doesn't hit the ground, it starts its next turn prone but can spend half its movement to end the prone condition.
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
This is answered in Xanathar's. A flying creature falls 500 feet (optionally reduced by its flying speed). If it doesn't hit the ground, it starts its next turn prone but can spend half its movement to end the prone condition.
The only issue with that rule is that technically according to the wording the fall is instantaneous and you can only stop your fall on your next turn. I was going to use it in my last campaign when the dragon was going to take the stupid barbarian with it, but in that case the dragon wanted to crater.

Instead, I'd probably rule that to stop the 500 ft fall there'd have to be either an athletics or acrobatics check to stop the fall. Another option is to define diving as letting flying creatures far exceed their normal speed and give them movement times four.
 

jgsugden

Explorer
A flying creature can choose to fall, generally. It may also choose not to fall and instead to use their ability to fly. They can drop down out of the sky, falling, and then elect to stop falling and fly (unless some condition limits their ability to fly, such as being knocked prone or having their move reduced to zero).

My house rule: In my game, I give creatures with a flight speed a diving speed. For creatures with natural winged flight, it is generally 400 feet (not 500 feet as controlling the fall slows your descent some). It can only be used straight down. That tends to handle these issues.
 

MarkB

Hero
The only issue with that rule is that technically according to the wording the fall is instantaneous and you can only stop your fall on your next turn.
That doesn't seem unreasonable for a creature that has been rendered unable to fly. At least Xanathar's introduces the optional rule to reduce the distance by the creature's flying speed, representing its ability to cushion its fall.
 

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