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D&D 5E How do you hope WotC treats the upcoming classic settings?

Mercurius

Legend
The main contenders seem to be Planescape, Dark Sun, and Dragonlance, with the Forgotten Realms, Greyhawk and Spelljammer being darkhorses, and everything else varying shades of unlikely.

But this is all speculation, so you decide which ones you want to talk about.

To elaborate the question of the thread title a bit more, how do you hope WotC produces these classic settings? Presentation, format, and--at the heart of it--the setting itself.

Some thoughts...

Planescape: Detailed treatment of Sigil and the Outlands. Re-envision the Factions, but keep them in place. Touch on the planes, but go into detail in later supplements and/or adventures. De-emphasize the 90s-esque vibe, but keep it cosmic and otherworldly, Sigil as the "universal city."

I'd also like to see them incorporate elements of 4E, particularly the Astral Sea, and spelljammers as an alternate means of conveyance.

Also, a treatment on "variant cosmologies," playing with the idea that the true nature and structure of the cosmos and planes is inherently unknown, but with different cosmologies that yield different results.

Dark Sun: This is one setting that I hope they take a different approach than the past. Keep Dark Sun, Dark Sun, but I want to see more of the world, not just a third (or fourth) rehash of the Tyr region. I want to see the entire planet, or at least large portions of it. Sure, keep large swathes unknown and inhospitable, but I want to see WotC's version of this map:

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Furthermore, go for exotic: don't try to force all the core 5E races and classes into the setting, but emphasize other ones, unique to the setting.

Oh yeah, solid, epic rules for becoming dragons and avangions.

Dragonlance: I grew up on the Chronicles and Legends, so for me those stories are Dragonlance. I didn't read much after, and from what I've gathered, it sort of went all "X-Menish" post Claremont: complexity upon complexity, with an overall diminishing effect. That said, do we need another rehash? Anyhow, I'd take one of two approaches:
1. Classic Dragonlance - War of the Lance, but revisioned and updated. Bring more depth and detail to Ansalon, and touch upon Taladas and even other continents, but keep the details for possible later expansions.
2. Advanced timeline - with all the books in the past, the stuff of legend. A new Krynn, with Taladas playing a more central. And Irda!
 

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overgeeked

B/X Known World
No matter how they do it, someone will be mad.

I think Ravenloft was a let down because of the page count and the trimmed down nature of it being a single hardback.

Most of these deserve a lot more than decades of lore, factions, NPCs, and monsters crammed into 256 pages.

To do them right, the settings should be at least three books, if not four. A box or slipcase with 3-4 books and a heap of accessories would be best.

The first book is the main setting info. History, lore, manor cities, regions, character stuff, new rules, etc. Really go in depth.

The second book is nothing but monsters. Creatures, beasts, factions, enemies, legendary creatures, and other NPCs. But done properly. With ecology, tactics, lore DCs, interesting actions and defenses, etc. Basically the best parts of how earlier editions handled monsters.

The third book should be an adventure path that takes the PCs from 0-20. Yes, zero. And moves them through the high points of the setting. Having played through the AP should give the player the chance to learn the high-level lore from the setting book and a lot of the details along the way.

The optional fourth book should be an anthology of shorter adventures and side quests that can be added to the main AP, dropped in to any campaign in the setting, or maybe used somewhere else. The focus should be on filling in the rest of the lore blanks rather than compatibility with or ability to port them into other settings.

Though another thought is to go Enemy Within and do a massive, sprawling, 5-6-part AP that covers it all. Though I don’t think they (or we) could handle how awesome that would be.
 


pming

Legend
Hiya!

For me, simple:

"Convert... don't 'Update'..."

I don't care what setting it is (other than Mystara or Greyhawk; I don't want either of those touched...I don't trust WotC to do it 'correctly'...or at least not 'correctly' for me). Whatever it is though, I don't want it "updated"...just converted.

Hope that makes sense.

^_^

Paul L. Ming
 

TheSword

Legend
For me I want them to look at what was ace about the original setting and bring that to the 5e, not slavishly try and keep every event, location and NPC etc the same. Essentially how they did Curse of Strahd and Van Richtens guide.

What is absolutely key for me though is that they release a AP book. I don’t mind if it’s a Curse or Strahd style book with the setting included and a Campaign book to expand the world but I want both.

My dream is for a 10 book Adventure Path and Sourcebook supplement like Enemy Within but let’s be honest it’s never going to happen, even on a smaller scale. Though imagine how awesome a 4 book (four tier) adventure would be setting in four areas of the Forgotten Realms each with a companion book to detail the area further.
 

Hussar

Legend
Whereas to me, Ravenloft is a setting done right.

I do rather hope Dragonlance gets the update. You could bang out a 20 level (or, heck, if you're traditional, start the group at 5th level) adventure path following, loosely, the War of the Lance. But, instead of a single path, I'd rather they did the Dragon Heist method of presenting several adventure locations that can then be modified depending on what happened before. So, the adventure locations will largely be the same, but, the story is very different depending on the choices the players make.

So, the Dragonlance book (or really any of these setting books) could very much benefit from a Dragon Heist style treatment where the adventure is half setting gazetteer, half adventure and then let the individual tables work it out.

What I never want to see again is a setting "line". If I have to buy more than one or two books to get the setting information, I'm just not interested. Settings are disposable. One and done is a perfectly fine way to go.
 

fenixfenix

Villager
I would love to see them go hard on Dark Sun. New mechanics for crafting/piecemealing armor and weapons from crude materials.
New mechanics for spellcasting (defiler and all that).
A new version of the Thri Kreen.
Muls and other half breed races/subraces.
And if not the whole world, a region we have not seen before would be a nice change.
 

See, I already found good 3rd party 5e conversions of Dragonlance, Ravenloft and Planescape's mechanics, so I no longer care what they do with those. I want the same thing for Spelljammer and Dark Sun, but I dont expect them to do it in a way i would be happy with. I'm sure all those new fans would like it though.
 

DEFCON 1

Legend
I hope they produce a book. And that book puts the setting into the consciousness of those players who weren't familiar with the setting prior to that.

And then I hope the DMs who were and are familiar with those settings can now find players who are interested in playing in it... and then the DM goes back and just re-uses all the setting material they already own from all the editions past and is completely unconcerned with what is in the 5E book. They don't need a 5E book to run these settings. They never have. So I'm hoping against hope they remember that and can use everything they ever had at their disposal to make their game exactly the way they want it, regardless of what Perkins, Levitch, Wyatt, Crawford, and the others wrote down in the 5E book.
 

jeremypowell

Adventurer
If/when they do Dragonlance, I feel confident it will have the same relationship to the original War of the Lance module saga as Curse of Strahd does to the original Ravenloft module. It'll be a "fresh take" / expansion upon the original storyline.

The only difference is that with Strahd there's an easy cyclical "eternal penance" canonical excuse for rehashing the same story, whereas with Dragonlance they will either have to A) create a similar in-world excuse for the reboot or B) ignore canon.

Given how much effort they've made to incorporate / allude to / namecheck old Forgotten Realms lore (yes, I really believe that, though of course I know that many hardcore FR fans just scowled at their screens and started composing angry rebuttals), I would have laid a little money (not a lot) on option A—until WotC's recent "Pre-5e Lore Isn't the Boss of Us" press release. Now I would wager a lot on option B; it's still possible that the new DL novel trilogy will provide a canon-respecting justification for the reboot (possibly involving either time-travel, a trope that already has been used in Dragonlance canon, or else multiversitude), but I now highly doubt that a WotC DL RPG book would make any effort to respect or acknowledge the decades of post–War of the Lance DL continuity.

Which is probably for the best.
 

TheSword

Legend
I hope they produce a book. And that book puts the setting into the consciousness of those players who weren't familiar with the setting prior to that.

And then I hope the DMs who were and are familiar with those settings can now find players who are interested in playing in it... and then the DM goes back and just re-uses all the setting material they already own from all the editions past and is completely unconcerned with what is in the 5E book. They don't need a 5E book to run these settings. They never have. So I'm hoping against hope they remember that and can use everything they ever had at their disposal to make their game exactly the way they want it, regardless of what Perkins, Levitch, Wyatt, Crawford, and the others wrote down in the 5E book.
I think this is why I would prefer adventures more than guides. I don’t need a gazetteer of Tyr or a discussion of trade routes to Nibenay I want completed adventures and most important of all… maps for VTT.

There are some settings that are fiendishly difficult to get quality maps for. Planescape and Darksun particularly.
 

Aldarc

Legend
Nentir Vale (pipe dream): keep the tone points of light. The Nentir Vale should be represented more as a playground setting that exists in sketched form. It's mythic in scope - i.e., the Chaoskampf of the Dawn War - but the setting should feel incomplete and not fully realized in terms of its details: again, it should exist more as a sketch or toolkit. Included tips for the GM on filling in the details, adventure hooks, coloring in the setting, and incorporating player backgrounds/goals/mythos into the game play. Writing Team: James Wyatt, Rich Baker, and Chris Perkins. Possible forward by Matt Mercer on how he used the 4e background materials (e.g., pantheon, Dawn War, etc.) to build his own Exandria setting.
 


Most of these deserve a lot more than decades of lore, factions, NPCs, and monsters crammed into 256 pages.

To do them right, the settings should be at least three books, if not four. A box or slipcase with 3-4 books and a heap of accessories would be best.
Been saying this for a long time. Instead of releasing 1 FR book, 1 RL book, a mega adventure, a dice pack, etc. as they've been doing, to really do things right make it the year of Darksun, Planescape or Spelljammer and release a bunch of books for one setting back to back. That's what I want and hope they do. Now I'm just speculating but I doubt they will.
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
How do I hope they treat the old settings?

Let the past die. Kill it if you have to. It's the only way for the settings to become who they were meant to be.

The old settings will always be there. You can still use them! If they are going to re-visit them, take the good stuff, and go punk-rock on the rest. Give a new generation something to call their own. The only way to keep something alive is to re-invent it.
 

GuyBoy

Adventurer
I hope it’s Greyhawk and, in a perfect world, I’d like to see:
A world book, but updated to (a suggestion) 50 years in advance of the last timeline, which would allow “clearing” of things which don’t sit well to a more modern audience. This may upset some purists, but I still think it would work well.
A monster/NPC book
A Return To...style adventure: my personal choice would be Tsojcanth and Tharizdun modules, but there are others.
A brand new adventure set in Greyhawk somewhere. Possibly the city itself but I wouldn’t really mind.

Like several earlier posters, a boxed set a la Night Below would be a dream...and sometimes they do come true.
 

I hope it's with mechanics thst change o5e core rules. I don't expect to be see thst actually happen.though

Many of the older settings need mechsnics tweaks to fit the tones and themes but with eberron and ravenloft thst didnt happen
 

iserith

Magic Wordsmith
How do I hope they treat the old settings?

Let the past die. Kill it if you have to. It's the only way for the settings to become who they were meant to be.

The old settings will always be there. You can still use them! If they are going to re-visit them, take the good stuff, and go punk-rock on the rest. Give a new generation something to call their own. The only way to keep something alive is to re-invent it.
Agreed! Decades of play experience later, we can take what's good, leave behind what's bad, and add some new stuff that preserves the theme and tone in a more practical format. The past is important, but it's not all good by default. (I've been reading a lot of AD&D 2e modules recently and holy cow they are bad.)
 

Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
How do I hope they treat the old settings?

Let the past die. Kill it if you have to. It's the only way for the settings to become who they were meant to be.

The old settings will always be there. You can still use them! If they are going to re-visit them, take the good stuff, and go punk-rock on the rest. Give a new generation something to call their own. The only way to keep something alive is to re-invent it.

Off-topic, but the really ironic thing about the "Let the past die, kill it if you have to," line is that folks quote it to say "Disney hates the longtime fans, this is a veiled reference to how they want to disregard old fans and destroy what we love about OG Star Wars." Which makes no sense at all because Kylo Ren is the villain in the movie... but I digress.
 

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