log in or register to remove this ad

 

General How Much Dungeon Crawling Do You Do?

How Much of Your Game Time is Dungeon Crawling?

  • None of very litte.

    Votes: 1 1.8%
  • A small amount, no more than 10%.

    Votes: 9 16.4%
  • Some, no more than 25%

    Votes: 11 20.0%
  • A bit, up to 50%.

    Votes: 15 27.3%
  • A lot, up to 75%.

    Votes: 16 29.1%
  • Most or nearly all, up to 90%

    Votes: 2 3.6%
  • I don't like you or your poll.

    Votes: 1 1.8%

  • Total voters
    55
Then just about anything that takes place in a physical location counts as a "dungeon crawl" and the words become kind of meaningless. It also probably wouldn't qualify based on wikipedia's definition

A dungeon crawl is a type of scenario in fantasy role-playing games in which heroes navigate a labyrinth environment (a "dungeon"), battling various monsters, avoiding traps, solving puzzles, and looting any treasure they may find.[1] Video games which predominantly feature dungeon crawl elements are considered to be a genre.[1]
For me a 'dungeon' is any locale where the players are expected to deal with a series of encounters in relative close proximity to each other (temporally).

It could be a ruin, a cave network, a castle, sewers, trails and clearings in a forest, mines or anything of that nature.

Any time the party are in formation, and moving from area to area dealing with something in that area.

For mine, 'dungeons' take up 50-75 percent of game time, with the rest being mainly upkeep in towns, travel to (and (from) dungeons, and social pillar stuff.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

Azzy

Newtype
Up to 75%. Generally more than I'd like, but it's an easy fallback and the players seem to enjoy it for the most part.
 

THEMNGMNT

Adventurer
I run mostly location-based adventures. For example, in my Dragon Heist remix, the 3rd level PCs have:

  1. Burgled a house
  2. Infiltrated a prison to rescue one prisoner and kill another
  3. Assaulted a ruined clock tower
  4. Investigated an ancient library

I consider each of those to be a "dungeon" for purposes of this poll.

In between each of those adventures have been a single session where the PCs deal with the fallout from their last adventure and plan their next move.
 

Personally, I enjoy an equal mix of dungeon-crawling, hex crawling, and politicking.

I defined dungeon as an enclosed space (cavern, library, haunted house, etc.), where time is measure in movement and movement choices are inherently limited.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
There is (unsurprisingly) a bit of disagreement going on here as to what qualifies as a “dungeon.” The OP defines a dungeon as “any closed location where the primary goal of the PCs is to explore (probably in search of something) with dangers and wonders in their way.” That’s not a bad definition, and by that definition I voted “a lot, up to 75%.”

For those who find the definition too narrow, I propose this alternative: a dungeon is any place where the structure of the adventure coincides with a physical structure. In a dungeon, the scenes and encounters are associated with literal rooms, and the transitions between those scenes and encounters are literal hallways.
 

Lanefan

Victoria Rules
For those who find the definition too narrow, I propose this alternative: a dungeon is any place where the structure of the adventure coincides with a physical structure. In a dungeon, the scenes and encounters are associated with literal rooms, and the transitions between those scenes and encounters are literal hallways.
That's a reasonable definition, though there's always going to be edge cases the most obvious of which is when the 'physical structure' is particularly large and-or has undefined borders such as a forest or city or even a whole new plane.

Is X1 Isle of Dread a dungeon? For purposes of the definition as presented in the OP I'd say yes, though I personally don't see it as a 'dungeon crawl'.

Given that broadness in definition, and thinking only in terms of actual adventuring time as opposed to downtime, treasury division, etc. which I ignored, I voted 90%
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
That's not at all what I proposed.
But that is how @aco175 is interpreting it. I mean, yes, I agree that my haunted house was a dungeon, and an exception to my general "no dungeon" rules. But it was the exception to the rule for my campaign, a structure or location that actively puts obstacles in the way of the PCs. In my case, the house itself was an opponent and full of obstacles the PCs had to overcome.

That's quite rare in my campaigns. Environment and hazards have an effect now and then, but it doesn't matter if it's indoors or outdoors. I'm not saying you took it to that extreme, just that if someone does then it ceases to have much meaning IMHO. I would never consider a cottage a dungeon for example, because it's going to only have a couple of rooms. Unless of course, you've been shrunken down to the size of mice and need to battle the mighty house cat Fluffy. :)

In any case, sorry for derailing the thread. I just don't think that because an encounter takes place in a defined location that the location becomes a dungeon and it gets qualified as a dungeon crawl. To me, the wikipedia entry defines it well. I agree that a crashed spaceship, a tunnel network, a sunken pirate ship can all function as dungeon crawls. On the other hand, fighting off pirates on a ship even if the PCs start in the lower decks of the ship and have to fight their way the top through multiple areas.
 

Reynard

Legend
For those who find the definition too narrow, I propose this alternative: a dungeon is any place where the structure of the adventure coincides with a physical structure. In a dungeon, the scenes and encounters are associated with literal rooms, and the transitions between those scenes and encounters are literal hallways.
My personal quibble with this definition is that it includes, for example, the PCs gathering information from various sides of a political conflict in a friendly castle. That's a perfectly valid and fun adventure, politicking and trading favors, but it isn't what I would define as a "dungeon adventure" for purposes of the poll. Now, make the place unfriendly and throw in a sense of tension through danger and exploration (the politicking is between the Drow Theocracy and the Ghoul Empire and the PCs aren't supposed to be there) and it's a dungeon again.
 

TwoSix

Unserious gamer
Supporter
My personal quibble with this definition is that it includes, for example, the PCs gathering information from various sides of a political conflict in a friendly castle. That's a perfectly valid and fun adventure, politicking and trading favors, but it isn't what I would define as a "dungeon adventure" for purposes of the poll. Now, make the place unfriendly and throw in a sense of tension through danger and exploration (the politicking is between the Drow Theocracy and the Ghoul Empire and the PCs aren't supposed to be there) and it's a dungeon again.
An adventure defined by intruding into and exploring a physical space for purposes of discovery and acquisition?

I mean, if you're not intruding, it's not really a dungeon crawl.
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
If going into a location with potentially hostile enemies qualifies as a dungeon crawl, does that mean I do dungeon crawls when I visit my in-laws? :unsure:
 


Doug McCrae

Legend
a dungeon is any place where the structure of the adventure coincides with a physical structure.
That's an interesting idea. A linear dungeon, such as one that consists of five rooms in a row, will probably lead to a linear adventure. A non-linear structure, such as a mega-dungeon, will lead to a non-linear adventure. We don't know if the PCs will spend all their time on level 1 dealing with giant centipedes and kobolds, or fall down a chute to level 4 and get killed by werewolves.

A couple of problems:
1) A linear dungeon that exists in a sandbox campaign could be part of a non-linear adventure. The PCs might enter the first room, get scared, and go back home or enter a different dungeon.
2) A city map containing marked points of interest would, like the mega-dungeon, lead to a non-linear adventure. But we wouldn't normally call that a dungeon, even though the physical structure (non-linear) does coincide with the adventure structure.
 

TwoSix

Unserious gamer
Supporter
If going into a location with potentially hostile enemies qualifies as a dungeon crawl, does that mean I do dungeon crawls when I visit my in-laws? :unsure:
Man, I'm not going to touch that with a 10 foot pole. :)
 


Reynard

Legend
2) A city map containing marked points of interest would, like the mega-dungeon, lead to a non-linear adventure. But we wouldn't normally call that a dungeon, even though the physical structure (non-linear) does coincide with the adventure structure.
I think this question underscores one important aspect of what makes something a "dungeon" -- it has to be an unfriendly contained* location, where the PCs aren't just exploring but also under threat. A city isn't a megadungeon normally, but Goblintown might be.

*This part is important too.The Cursed Wood isn't a dungeon if the PCs can go any direction at any time within it, but it is if their movements is so hampered as to force choices along set paths.
 

iserith

Magic Wordsmith
I realize that nobody reads the DMG, particularly experienced DMs of which there are many on enworld, but dungeons are defined in the DMG, page 99, and fleshed out on subsequent pages. Adventure types - location-based vs. event-based - are defined on pages 72 and 75, respectively. If you really need a definition before you can decide how to answer a poll, there you go.
 

GlassJaw

Hero
I've found my group likes dungeon crawling in the 25-40% range. They thrive in the social and exploration pillars but get bogged down when there's a lot of filler combat (which tends to be the case in published modules and dungeons).

When I do bring a dungeon into the campaign, I really try to make it concise and thematic. Same for combat. Every battle doesn't need to be an epic struggle to save the world but if it's just goblins after goblins my group checks out (understandably).
 

dnd4vr

The Smurfiest Wizard Ever!
If going into a location with potentially hostile enemies qualifies as a dungeon crawl, does that mean I do dungeon crawls when I visit my in-laws? :unsure:
Yes. Simply Yes. And I hope you make it out alive... we would miss you here otherwise. :(
 

pogre

Hero
When I run D&D I run a ton of Dungeons - it's in the name! Besides the rules work really well for dungeon crawling and it matches players' expectations for a game of D&D. When I run different games there are virtually no dungeons - different expectations and all that.

Naturally, YMMV! :)
 

Reynard

Legend
I realize that nobody reads the DMG, particularly experienced DMs of which there are many on enworld, but dungeons are defined in the DMG, page 99, and fleshed out on subsequent pages. Adventure types - location-based vs. event-based - are defined on pages 72 and 75, respectively. If you really need a definition before you can decide how to answer a poll, there you go.
Good thing I defined the term in the OP, huh? ;)
 

COMING SOON: 5 Plug-In Settlements for your 5E Game

Advertisement2

Advertisement4

Top