I just threw away 100+ RPG books

Reynard

Legend
A few years ago I went through an exercise of scanning all my old notes, character sheets, and the like - 30+ years of personal gaming history. But... while there was some good stuff in there, honestly they wouldn't have been any great loss to the world.
From a historical perspective, that's not really for you to judge.
 

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Well, motivated by this thread, I bagged and boxed up 63 books and boxed sets, plus a mass of binders and folders of hardcopy campaign notes.

All that is left are 8 books, two boxed sets, a few maps, and a partial set of Harn setting books (the ones I don't have on pdf).

About half the remaining items are probably going to end up on the scrapheap too, but not today. It is amazing how much of the stuff I have thrown away was systems and settings I never used. More than a few books haven't been opened since before the last time I moved, in '94.

I kept a lot of notes from my earliest days of gaming; I started keeping everything on a computer in the late 80s, so past that date most of my campaign still exist on disk, although I've only gone back to that sort of material a couple times.
 


Cadence

Legend
Supporter
Jon Peterson's work on playing at the World (book and blog) is strong evidence that you are wrong.
It feels like the notes of folks when there were just a handful playing might be a bit more valuable to historians than the scribblings of one out of hundreds of thousands. :::shrugs:::

Still have most of mine in the basement anyway if they need some :)
 


Jon Peterson's work on playing at the World (book and blog) is strong evidence that you are wrong.
I would say it is strong evidence of the existence of a specific book. According to the LoC, there are 27 books in support of the (current) flat Earth theory.

Gamer stories are not that interesting, except to the people who shared those moments.
 


aramis erak

Legend
I don't get your point in the second sentence.
By destroying rather than sending to resale (even if it's just a charity store like St. Vinnie's or Value Village, or the SA store), you're decreasing the number of remaining copies in circulation. This drives prices for them up.
 

By destroying rather than sending to resale (even if it's just a charity store like St. Vinnie's or Value Village, or the SA store), you're decreasing the number of remaining copies in circulation. This drives prices for them up.
I would say that pdfs more than cover the gap. Plus there's literally no local options for donation.
 

aramis erak

Legend
I would say that pdfs more than cover the gap. Plus there's literally no local options for donation.
If there's a Catholic parish, the bishop's office can ALWAYS put one in touch with the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, which exists in almost all of the US dioceses. Common enough to have
Likewise, Lutheran Social Services can always put one in touch with a thrift store. Salvation Army can, too.

And, no, PDF doesn't make up for dead tree to the collector. I can hoard PDFs, sure, but I can't legally resell them on. But my 1979 printing of D&D OE are valuable artefacts... And will become more so as time goes on, provided I don't screw up, as others' copies go away, will rise in value. And after me, my daughters intend to keep that going...
 

If there's a Catholic parish, the bishop's office can ALWAYS put one in touch with the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, which exists in almost all of the US dioceses. Common enough to have
Likewise, Lutheran Social Services can always put one in touch with a thrift store. Salvation Army can, too.
As I said, there are no local options for donation of these type of books.

And, no, PDF doesn't make up for dead tree to the collector. I can hoard PDFs, sure, but I can't legally resell them on. But my 1979 printing of D&D OE are valuable artefacts... And will become more so as time goes on, provided I don't screw up, as others' copies go away, will rise in value. And after me, my daughters intend to keep that going...
Well, then my actions are good news to you, as your books just became a tiny fraction more valuable. That's how collecting works: you hang on to old crap in the hopes that someday it will be worth something. Me, I need storage space.
 

aramis erak

Legend
Well, then my actions are good news to you, as your books just became a tiny fraction more valuable. That's how collecting works: you hang on to old crap in the hopes that someday it will be worth something. Me, I need storage space.
maybe, but theyre bad for the hobby as a whole.
 


Reynard

Legend
It feels like the notes of folks when there were just a handful playing might be a bit more valuable to historians than the scribblings of one out of hundreds of thousands. :::shrugs:::

Still have most of mine in the basement anyway if they need some :)
My point is we don't know what's in those notes, and taken in aggregate all the notes of all the players would provide compelling historical data on trends and the growth of the hobby. That's how folk and social history works: collection of as much primary material as possible so actual research can be done by meticulous, skilled historians.
 

My point is we don't know what's in those notes, and taken in aggregate all the notes of all the players would provide compelling historical data on trends and the growth of the hobby. That's how folk and social history works: collection of as much primary material as possible so actual research can be done by meticulous, skilled historians.
pexels-photo-931317.jpeg
 


I don't believe there's a historical perspective to notes on a game of make-believe. Sentiment for a participant, sure.

The setting is make-believe. The game is a historical pastime...it's like casting notes for a village mummers' play.

I don't know how historically important D&D is going to be, but I wouldn't rule out it being of some interest down the line.
 


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