log in or register to remove this ad

 

I want smaller, leaner core books.

Reynard

Legend
I know most people love big giant hardbacks, but I really want to see the return of small, lean core rulebooks. There is no RPG that you could not present in a complete fashion in 64 pages with the right clarity of writing and layout. RPG core books are instruction manuals. They are technical writing. They can and should be much less prose dense and be much more utilitarian in design. Shove all those extra words in the supplements.

Adventures should be a mix of the two. One part should be an interesting read, laying out all the back story and interesting circumstances and NPCs and locations. And then there should be a strictly utilitarian portion designed for the sole purpose of supporting the GM in running the adventure.

Thank you for coming to my TED Talk.
 

log in or register to remove this ad


ragr

Explorer
I agree to a point that a core book should be as lean as possible; totally onboard with that. But.....

I don't want expansions either. I want everything that I'm going to need to run the game in that first book. Don't be giving me a dogpile of new rules and additional abilities - if they were that cool, they'd be core. If they ain't, kick them out the door.

Expand the world a little? Sure. Develop some cool scenarios that are flexible and pc engaging and enabling? Yup. Rules? No.

I appreciate I may be in the minority here.
 





My preference is for shorter, more concise core books. When I see an RPG core book that's the size of a phonebook, that definitely makes me less likely to pick it up. That being said, don't underestimate the value of evocative text. If you look at stuff like the BECMI red box, it's filled with words and art that inspire and spark the imagination.
 

"There is no RPG that you could not present in a complete fashion in 64 pages with the right clarity of writing and layout. RPG core books are instruction manuals. They are technical writing. They can and should be much less prose dense and be much more utilitarian in design."

That caters to people who are already in the hobby with a certain level of expertise. It would have nearly zero chance of appealing to novices and new players.

And without them...well, you certainly wouldn't be burdened with any further products.
 

embee

Lawyer by day. Rules lawyer by night.
I know most people love big giant hardbacks, but I really want to see the return of small, lean core rulebooks. There is no RPG that you could not present in a complete fashion in 64 pages with the right clarity of writing and layout. RPG core books are instruction manuals. They are technical writing. They can and should be much less prose dense and be much more utilitarian in design. Shove all those extra words in the supplements.

Adventures should be a mix of the two. One part should be an interesting read, laying out all the back story and interesting circumstances and NPCs and locations. And then there should be a strictly utilitarian portion designed for the sole purpose of supporting the GM in running the adventure.

Thank you for coming to my TED Talk.

So then you DON'T like a certain RPG with a 600+ page core rulebook that doesn't include the completely separate 200+ page game master guide?
 

It certainly makes for a very short-lived game company if it's only allowed to sell one short book.

I think he just means the core book (but adventures and setting books could also be part of the line).

This subject comes up a lot. I tend to cycle back and forth between wanting simpler, less prose heavy books, and wanting more complex, more prose heavy books. And my cycle seems to be every five years or so. Personally I think it is probably good for us to have books like the OP mentions, but also ones like the type he wouldn't want. I think some of it boils down to whether you are feeling like opening the book and getting right to the business of playing, or if you are looking for an RPG book that can pull you in with clever verbiage and inspire you as you read it. I find I often approach RPG books in these two ways.
 


AmerginLiath

Adventurer
All said, however, I do wonder if posts like this suggest a market for offering cheap bound prints of the basic rules for sale on newsstands and comics racks, for folks who are willing to shell out a few bucks rather than print out a bunch of pages or keep consulting a screen. As someone who used to play D&D on Boy Scout trips and long car rides, having effectively a pocket version of the rules (versus an entire box set) would be a useful addition to carry along with a small set of dice and a folded character sheet!
 




ragr

Explorer
It certainly makes for a very short-lived game company if it's only allowed to sell one short book.
As a game company you're "allowed" to sell what you want. There's no legislation. As a consumer, I'm "allowed" to buy what I want. I will, you will. Everyone can do what they want. That is allowed. Everyone's happy. In a different way. Who'd have thought?

To be clear, I'm happy to buy a 64 page book, I'm happy to buy a 364 page book. I'd prefer those to be as lean as possible in terms of prose as per the OP so would lean towards a lower page count. But, I'm only happy to buy one corebook containing rules and character options etc. While I might buy "setting" expansion and maybe scenarios/adventure/campaign books if they interest, what I'll not be buying is additional rulebooks and books with character options. Sorry if that hits any nerves.
 

"As a consumer, I'm "allowed" to buy what I want. "

Are you sure of that?

1607034305483.png
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
As a game company you're "allowed" to sell what you want. There's no legislation. As a consumer, I'm "allowed" to buy what I want. I will, you will. Everyone can do what they want. That is allowed. Everyone's happy. In a different way. Who'd have thought?
Calm down, mate. ;)
 


An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top