5E In our last session... some bits and bobs.

Galandris

Adventurer
I can understand the suicide taboo among players around the table, but in a world where resurrection magic is something the party has reliably access to (daily starting with the 3rd level Revify, which bring dead people back if you act quickly, later with raise dead at 5th level), you most likely wouldn't see dying as such a traumatic event it is in our society, since it is, at most, a temporary experience... Unless your settings has active gods who actually have an unfavorable view on suicide/assisted suicide, it could be seen as a mode of treatment for many "uncurable illness". Death, once triviliazed since you can "easily" get around it, shouldn't scare PCs as much as it does in our world. Even in our world, not all culture saw suicide as something inherently bad (Japan, India, in some ways Ancient Greece). To answer the OP, I am not particularly surprised by this strategy, in character and not as a metagaming tactic. Relation to death would be extremely different for people wit the knowledge to come back.

I can see it especially well in the context of the urgency. "yes, we all accept to die and reincarnate to have a chance to accomplish our goal. Its a harrowing experience to die and live in another body, but I'll do that for the sake of the mission". We have countless examples of soldiers self-sacrificing to save others, why not when their survival is guaranteed by the use of available magic?
 

Bacon Bits

Adventurer
Frankly, I think the problem is that, mechanically, Regenerate shouldn't be 7th level if your game is going to include permanent injury.

RAW, it's not really possible to incidentally maim or disfigure an individual. As a result, no matter how many swords hit you, no matter how many dragons bite you, no matter how many times you are struck by an arrow, set ablaze, or buried under rocks, you are not permanently harmed. Permanent injury is intended to be a narrative device rather than a mechanical one.

Regenerate is 7th level because narratively it's a waste of time to deal with permanent injuries if they can be readily healed. However, if a PC's permanent injury isn't improving the game and the player isn't enjoying it, then I would make curative magic relatively available during downtime. Requiring death and reincarnation to keep a player having fun and enjoying the campaign is absurd, and seems far more disruptive to the campaign narrative than waving away an injury for a thousand gold or two.
 

Coroc

Adventurer
...

The drow mage burned out the wizard's eyes. Next he cut out the druid (sorcerer)'s tongue, then cut off the rogue's right arm at the elbow, and castrated the paladin. The high elf was left unharmed until she will be sacrificed but was forced to watch everyone else.

The drow laughed cruelly, taunting her for her failure and the fate of her friends.
Enforcing the paladins celibate ... nice
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
For removing body parts: As a DM, I would tend to have solutions for permanent disadvantages to a character, though at a cost. My basic thought is that if someone decides they are too impairing and retires the character to bring in a replacement, the whole table has lost the relationships, the character arcs, etc.

Reincarnation: Should work just fine, but I know a lot of characters that wouldn't take the chance. A a ruling (vs. a rule), I'd keep the same ability scores but with the new racial mods. But since so many of my players at my table do match up racial ability mods and classes, that would likely have a bad effect on them so I'd also let them rearrange previously taken ASIs. Want a big in-game drama that they are in a new body, but I don't want a big out-of-game drama of a dissatisfied player until they level up to four times to get a new ASI.

Lesser Restoration: I'd make the same call. It could restore sight to a being that was blinded but otherwise able to see. Without eyes a PC doesn't fit that requirement.
 

oriaxx77

Villager
Suicide is not a well accepted thing by divine beings, usually a sin. I would not allow any spells to bring the person back.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Suicide is not a well accepted thing by divine beings, usually a sin. I would not allow any spells to bring the person back.
Really depends on the deity and context I would think. Especially when you consider how the intent to be raised affects sin, something quite different than real life. I don't want to draw real world parallels that may be disrespectful, but dying with expectations of miracles to return one to life does not seem to be inherently sinful in all cases. When in the context of various fictional beings of a fantasy pantheon with varied portfolios I don't think any general statement can be made.
 

NotAYakk

Adventurer
View attachment 117125

I think that fits the bill pretty well for power, level, etc. Does it look reasonable to others?
Give it a 1 minute casting time and a 1 day duration and slow down the healing, so the 7th level spell is always better. Like this:

You touch a creature to stimulate its natural healing ability. While under the effect of the spell, the creature regains 1d6 HP every hour. If cast on someone has a missing or otherwise damaged small body part, such as an eye, nose, finger, ear or tongue, the body part begins to regenerate over the day. A completely missing body part of that size can take 7 castings of this spell to completely recover, while one that is mostly intact would heal by the end of the day. If the missing body part is severed but otherwise intact, it can be held in place and make the regeneration occur in a single day.
 

dnd4vr

Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious!
Give it a 1 minute casting time and a 1 day duration and slow down the healing, so the 7th level spell is always better. Like this:

You touch a creature to stimulate its natural healing ability. While under the effect of the spell, the creature regains 1d6 HP every hour. If cast on someone has a missing or otherwise damaged small body part, such as an eye, nose, finger, ear or tongue, the body part begins to regenerate over the day. A completely missing body part of that size can take 7 castings of this spell to completely recover, while one that is mostly intact would heal by the end of the day. If the missing body part is severed but otherwise intact, it can be held in place and make the regeneration occur in a single day.
That works as well. I'll offer it as an alternative to the table when we play tomorrow. Thanks!
 
For those of you at home who also got here by googling "bits and boobs" welcome to the thread. It's less NSFW than it sounds.
 

Advertisement

Top