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D&D General In what modules can PCs fight an Archfey?

Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
Hi everybody! I'm thinking of making an Archfey one of the big bads of my 5E campaign, however the 5E bestiary for Fey is especially sparse on the high CR end. I know there is a lot of fan content and DMsGuild content out there, but I think I'd rather have a go at making my own statblock taking inspiration from older modules.

So my question for all of you more-experienced than I, in what modules are there Archfey (or other very powerful Fey) statted up for the PCs to fight against?

These can be modules from any edition of D&D, or from Pathfinder, Dungeon Crawl Classics, or Old School Essentials. I am talking specifically about modules, I know there are probably stats for Archfey in older bestiaries, but I'm more interested in the character/motivations of some of these Fey which modules tend to explore a little bit better (IMO).

So let me know in the comments below which modules have a really big Fey for the PCs to face off against, that I can use to inspire me!
 

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Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
Didn't the Candlekeep book have an Archfey that you could fight against or something?

It does, and that is actually the 5E game I'm running. However, the Queen of Air and Darkness is hunting down that Fey, so I'm thinking of using an evil more powerful Fey as the true big bad beyond the end of the CM.
 


J.Quondam

90% grunts. 10% thews.
I'm not familiar with any specific adventures myself, but a quick search on "Boss=Archfey" on AdventureLookup.com turns up a small handful of possibilities:
 

The ninth adventure of the adventure path ZEITGEIST: The Gears of Revolution involves fifteenth level PCs solving a murder among the fey court, and there are stats for various fey lords in case the party picks a fight.

Then in the tenth adventure, they have to subdue fey titans, four colossal creatures that control field and forest, mountain and sea. During the battle against the sea titan, one high level elf ally steps up as a major melee foe.

It's a little bit deep in the reeds because it's very late in an adventure path, But you might be able to use it. The adventure is called Godmind.
 


vincegetorix

Jewel of the North
I know Kobold Press has a fey-themed module for Pathfinder and 5e(?) called Wrath of the River King
and Necrotic Gnome has Daughter of the Winter King for OSE. I dont remember their level range, but you may find them useful.

KP also has Tales from the Old Margreve, which is similar to an free-form adventure path set in an gigantic fey forest.

As for stats, I find using high level drows from MToF and changing them a little to add traits such as the Darkling's ones fit the trope of Shadowy faes perfectly.
 



Quickleaf

Legend
Baba Yaga appeared as the closest thing to an archfey that I can recall in AD&D, first in Dragon #83 "The Dancing Hut" (1984) then later in S5 The Dancing Hut of Baba Yaga (1995).

Here's her stat block from Dragon...

BABA YAGA
FREQUENCY: Unique
ARMOR CLASS: -4
MOVE: 6
HIT POINTS: 135
NO. OF ATTACKS: 3
DAMAGE/ATTACK: 3-8/3-8/5-20
SPECIAL ATTACKS: Assassination; crushing; horror; magic spells
SPECIAL DEFENSES: Fire, magic, and poison resistance; illusion, psionic, and limited spell immunity; special detection powers; regeneration; magic item and spell-produced defenses; acute senses and godlike intelligence and wisdom
MAGIC RESISTANCE: 75%
SIZE: M (5 tall)
ALIGNMENT: Neutral evil
CLERIC/DRUID: 14th level druid (see below)
FIGHTER: 16+ HD monster
MAGIC-USER/ILLUSIONIST: 25th level magic-user / 15th level illusionist
THIEF/ASSASSIN: See below
MONK/BARD: Nil
SAVING THROWS: 3 in all categories (cannot be reduced further)
PSIONIC ABILITY: VI (see below)
S: 20 (+3/+8) I: 25 W: 23 D: 18 C: 21 CH: -1

Baba Yaga is perhaps the most famous of all legendary witches, and her powers are described well in Russian folklore and literature. Said to be related to the various races of night hags, annis, and green hags, with extraordinary powers in addition, she is a supernatural being on the level of the quasi-deities of Greyhawk (see DRAGON® Magazine #71) and saints (as described in DRAGON issue #79). Her wanderings have carried her far from her old home, and she wanders still on visits to monstrous relatives or on quests for rare treasures or living victims for her dinner. Since she eats as much per day as ten men, she searches for prey quite often.

In appearance, Baba Yaga is a man-sized, horrifyingly ugly old woman who walks crouched over. Her limbs are almost skeletal and are covered with hard gray-brown skin, upon which magical runes have been tattooed. She has a long, warty nose and a protruding chin, with ice-cold black eyes framed by her thin white hair. Stony teeth filed to points and iron claws on her fingers further emphasize her non-humanity.

She possesses the horror power from her negative charisma as per the DEITIES & DEMIGODS Cyclopedia, but can cause those so affected to be able to act if she so commands it. Any creature or character of 1 HD (or level) or less will never attack her, and will obey her every command out of fear for her power.

Baba Yaga is immune or resistant to many natural, magical, and psionic forces. Her godlike intelligence renders her immune to all illusion/phantasm spells, and her high wisdom grants her additional immunity to many will-force spells (as per the DDG Cyclopedia, p. 7).

Though not psionic, she possesses the equivalent of a permanent mind bar science (which resists charms, possession and similar mental control/attack), operating at the 20th level of mastery, and cannot be affected by psionic attacks.

Aging, natural or magical, has no effect on her.

The incredible constitution and the nonhuman makeup of this ancient witch gift her with additional immunities. She resists heat and flame as if wearing a ring of fire resistance, and poisons that would kill others do only 3-12 HP of damage if she fails to save against them. She regenerates lost hit points at the rate of 3 per round, whether the loss was caused by regular damage (wounds), fire, or acid. If one of her limbs or her head is severed, she is not slain; she can fight on and reattach the severed parts during or after the battle.

Baba Yaga can only be struck by magical weapons (+1 or better).

She is immune to cause wounds, harm, destruction, slay living, and similar or related spells. As a non-human, she is also immune to spells like charm person, hold person, animate dead, and so forth.

Because she cannot be summoned, dispel evil won't affect her, and protection from evil won't prevent her from clawing at victims (though it may reduce her attack effectiveness).

The following spell-like powers may be used by Baba Yaga at the rate of one power per round, at will: comprehend languages, detect magic, fear (as the wand), read magic, and tongues.

Note that she easily sees all invisible beings because of her high intelligence (since the spell is an illusion/ phantasm). She automatically sees any chicken track stigma that a character or creature may have (see the section on spell alterations).

She has normal infravision, plus ultravision to a range of 120.

Baba Yaga's druid abilities, in every way like those of a 14th-level druid, are not gained through divine intervention. She has learned the spell powers as a magic-user, and recovers her druid spells by studying her spell books and tomes.

She has an 80% chance of knowing an adventurer's nationality from his smell (it may remind her of someone she once ate from that place). Baba Yaga cannot be surprised at any time, and will know just by looking at a character what class, race, and approximate level the character is.

Despite her alignment and actions, Baba Yaga is more than just an evil monster. Magic-users, sages, and heroes appeal to her for guidance and knowledge, and quasi-deities and great heroes of all sorts have come to her to ask for her aid in solving problems. So long as characters are polite, they may receive help (she prefers to be called "Little Grandmother"). She will ask characters their names and their reasons for coming to her, automatically detecting all lies or distortions of the truth. If the characters are honest with her (unless they confess they came to kill her), she will be relatively pleasant and helpful, though abrupt in her actions and somewhat cruel in her choice of words. She often acts in a bizarre manner, and has been known to lie on the floor and meditate on problems for days.

If she decides to help, she will geas the characters in payment for her assistance. Usually she will ask for some unusual magical item to be recovered for her, or for an enemy of hers to be slain or driven away. She always sets tasks that are nearly impossible to accomplish, and offers as a reward the characters' lives (which become forfeit if the task isn't finished to her satisfaction). Sometimes she will offer a rich reward, but not very often. Careful reading of the Russian folktales about her will give a better impression of her personality.

For some reason, though they are the most vulnerable to her, good-aligned beings that have 1 HD (or level) or less will not be harmed by Baba Yaga. She believes this would bring a great curse upon her from all good-aligned deities who protect the weak and good, and she instead sends such beings away. Many tales are told of good children who were abandoned on the doorstep of the Hut, to be taken in as servants for a short time before being sent away. Oddly, the children (nearly always young girls) benefited from the experience in various ways; Baba Yaga often rewarded good performance from such children with great gifts, possibly to appease the deities that were looking out for the youngsters.

Referees should determine what spells she will possess at any given time, keeping these guidelines in mind: Baba Yaga trusts no one, and particularly not other evil characters; she relies heavily on defensive spells; and she prefers to summon demons, devils, daemons, demodands, etc., for assistance and to do her fighting for her. She does not draw protective circles or pentagrams when conjuring aid, since no creature from the Outer Planes or Elemental Planes would dare try to challenge her, out of fear of her and what she can do. The conjured being will fulfill her commands for the duration of the summoning spell or until Baba Yaga dismisses the servant, whichever comes first. Take note of the spell alterations within the Hut when assigning spells to her.

Though Baba Yaga can use most weapons, she prefers to attack weaker beings with her claws and teeth. If she catches someone with both of her claws, she has a chance of killing the victim instantly, as a 9th-level assassin (using the assassin's tables in the DMG). Inanimate objects must save vs. crushing blow if she bites them or grasps them roughly, and her claws and teeth can destroy wooden materials up to 1' thick.

Interestingly, Baba Yaga is completely familiar with gunpowder technology (having seen it used on her home world), but scorns it and all higher technologies completely. She believes in the powers of magic, and will never use weapons other than swords, scimitars, and the like.
 

Ancalagon

Dusty Dragon
The ninth adventure of the adventure path ZEITGEIST: The Gears of Revolution involves fifteenth level PCs solving a murder among the fey court, and there are stats for various fey lords in case the party picks a fight.

Then in the tenth adventure, they have to subdue fey titans, four colossal creatures that control field and forest, mountain and sea. During the battle against the sea titan, one high level elf ally steps up as a major melee foe.

It's a little bit deep in the reeds because it's very late in an adventure path, But you might be able to use it. The adventure is called Godmind.
I've played part of that adventure path and it is fantastic
 

If you go onto D&D Beyond you can list all WotC fey by decreasing CR.

The top three are Trostani, from Ravnica, the one already mentioned in Candlekeep, and the Sea Fury, a kind of hag from Wildemont.
 

Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
If you go onto D&D Beyond you can list all WotC fey by decreasing CR.

The top three are Trostani, from Ravnica, the one already mentioned in Candlekeep, and the Sea Fury, a kind of hag from Wildemont.

Yeah I know, but only Trostani feels like a worthy final bad guy, and she doesn't even feel like an Archfey.
 



I guess you could take some of the high level NPC statblocks like archmage and archdruid and give them common archfey characteristics.

Type: Fey
Fly 40 ft. (hover)
Legendary Resistance 3/day
Spell Resistance
Legendary action: Fey Step (teleport 30 ft.)
 

Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
I am not very familiar with 4E, but I was able to dig up the Winter Witch's stats;

1626714649610.png


She seems pretty tough to me. Turning it into 5E would be a little complicated (turning some of these abilities to passives and legendary actions) but she would definitely make a formidable end-game boss.
 

I am not very familiar with 4E, but I was able to dig up the Winter Witch's stats;

View attachment 140859

She seems pretty tough to me. Turning it into 5E would be a little complicated (turning some of these abilities to passives and legendary actions) but she would definitely make a formidable end-game boss.
I've never run the adventure she's in, but I have looked over it and would like to adapt it to 5E. Here's some general notes if you're interested in using Koliada:
  • The archfey known as the Prince of Frost rules from the Fortress of Frozen Tears in his domain in the Feywild, the Vale of Long Night. He is a son of the Summer Queen and was once known as the Sun Prince until his beloved, an eladrin noblewoman named Sharaea, grew bored of the Feywild and departed to become an adventurer in the Material Plane. Sharaea eventually fell in love with one of her adventuring companions, and when the Sun Prince called for his love to return she refused him. Angered and jealous of the mortal man who "stole" Sharaea away from him, the Sun Prince began to burn with anger and swore vengeance on Sharaea's new lover. Sharaea, hoping that the Sun Prince's anger would one day fade, joined her mortal lover in making a pact with the Raven Queen to have the lovers reincarnated in the future. The Sun Prince's anger did eventually give way, but in the process he became a bitter, hateful, and envious creature known as the Prince of Frost.
  • While the Prince of Frost holds mortals in contempt, he rarely acts directly against them, instead letting his warlocks do such things in his stead. Though the Prince of Frost dwells in his Fortress of Frozen Tears, another archfey known as Koliada the Winter Witch has taken it upon herself to try and punish the mortal world through invasions every century or so. The last time the chill armies of the Winter Witch appeared, however, heroes bearing a sword of sunlight called Sun's Sliver chased Koliada back into the Feywild to her own fortress of Winter's Heart. The archfey escaped, and the heroes left Sun's Sliver in the hidden monastery of Saint Alabat to be claimed by whoever would use it to oppose Koliada once her forces appeared in the mortal world again.
  • Though Koliada is unaware of it, the demon lord Orcus has conspired to have demonic and undead agents steal the Sun's Sliver so that her next march will be its most destructive yet, the chaos and death caused by her campaign benefiting him in some way (it is true that the Prince of Frost holds a grudge against the Raven Queen and Orcus is an enemy of the goddess). However, the Sun's Sliver is protected by a powerful angel named Remliel who tests all who would claim it.
  • The fey crossing to the region of the Feywild holding Koliada's fortress of Winter's Heart is hidden within a menhir circle of blue ice.
  • Koliada's army includes the white dragon Kurikveaeri, quicklings imbued with icy magic, ice trolls, treants, and winter eladrin.
  • Koliada's own origin is unknown. Some claim she is herself as an aspect of the Prince of Frost focused on vengeance against mortals (indeed, she seems obsessed with waging war against them). Others say she is a relative of the Prince of Frost, and others a consort.
  • Koliada's sword is made of black ice obtained from some layer of the Abyss.
This last part here is just my personal idea, but I thought it would be interesting if Koliada really did turn out to be an aspect of the Prince of Frost, but one he created unknowingly. Koliada wages war against mortals to please the Prince of Frost and win his love, hoping to make him forget about Sharaea. She is an embodiment not only of the Prince of Frost's hatred of mortals, but also conflicting desires to be loved and to spurn that love the same way he feels Sharaea spurned his. Uncovering this could be an alternate way to deal with Koliada rather than killing her with Sun's Sliver, instead convincing her to become her own person independent of the Prince of Frost and his desires.
 
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For something completely different and less detailed, you could also go with Hespotherad from 4E's Tomb of Horrors. He just sort of randomly shows up in a section of the Dead God's Tomb on Pluton and challenges the party to a game after having single-handedly slaughtered a number of Acererak's minions. If he loses or discovers his opponent is cheating he flies into a rage and attacks with a longsword and a combination of poison and psychic magic, teleporting away if his life is in danger.

Who is Hespotherad? Why is an archfey of games fighting Acererak's minions in Pluton? IDK. He never showed up before and hasn't since. He got statted-up, though.

hespotherad.PNG


There are a handful of other archfey that were mentioned in 4E, several of which got stats and write-ups in the various Court of Stars articles (such as Hyrsam the Satyr Prince, Tuxil the Trinket Lord, and the Bramble Queen).

There are other, pre-4E entities that were later identified as archfey, but seeing as 4E was the first edition to precisely define the fey and very prominently feature a consistent faerie plane it'll be difficult to find applicable pre-4E content.
 
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