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Pathfinder 2E Is it time for a new Pathfinder Setting?

dave2008

Legend
I just noticed the new 5e Ravenloft setting book was #1 in D&D and #40 in books and I thought wow, this setting is really popular (not my taste personally). Then I thought, should Paizo make a new setting(s) for Pathfinder? After 10 yrs of Golarion only, would a new setting inject some new life into Pathfinder? Is that something that would interest you? What are your thoughts?
 

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Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
A new D&D book being #1 in D&D isn't surprising. I think they'd be doing something very wrong if that wasn't the case.

They all do that pretty much automatically -- people pre-order them sight unseen. I'm not convinced that it being a setting book made a difference.
 

TwoSix

Unserious gamer
Supporter
I just noticed the new 5e Ravenloft setting book was #1 in D&D and #40 in books and I thought wow, this setting is really popular (not my taste personally). Then I thought, should Paizo make a new setting(s) for Pathfinder? After 10 yrs of Golarion only, would a new setting inject some new life into Pathfinder? Is that something that would interest you? What are your thoughts?
I think it sounds cool, but I think a lot of their fans would be vocally unhappy. A lot of them are more invested in the lore of the APs and the setting books than they are in the system itself.
 

TwiceBorn2

Explorer
I have a vast library of Pathfinder 1.0 products, but haven't and won't make the switch to 2.0 in large part because Golarion doesn't inspire me as a setting, and I can't be bothered to convert other settings and adventures I like to 2.0. I've found myself losing interest in their adventure path themes, and the Wayne Reynolds art style--however good it may be from a technical point of view--likewise no longer appeals to me (and that is a key factor in getting me excited to run a game).

I doubt that a new setting would be enough to bring me back to the fold (I have zero interest in Starfinder), but who knows...? At the moment, I'm happy with the reallocation of dollars that once went to Pathfinder products, to D&D, CoC7th, and Year Zero products.
 

kenada

Legend
Supporter
I just noticed the new 5e Ravenloft setting book was #1 in D&D and #40 in books and I thought wow, this setting is really popular (not my taste personally). Then I thought, should Paizo make a new setting(s) for Pathfinder? After 10 yrs of Golarion only, would a new setting inject some new life into Pathfinder? Is that something that would interest you? What are your thoughts?
I’d be very surprised if they did that. One of the things that Lisa Stevens has cited in her review of the death of TSR and its influence on Paizo’s business model is that they fragmented their audience by releasing lots of setting books. For a game with a small audience (e.g., Pathfinder), having two books with fewer sales individually but more total than one can be worse financially due to higher unit costs for smaller print runs.

How can 5e do it but not Paizo? 5e has an extremely large audience. WotC can do things that smaller publishers cannot. WotC has also avoided flooding the market with setting books. They haven’t created separate lines for them. They have so far released one book for a setting and then moving onto the next thing while leaving GM’s Guild to fill in the gaps.
 

Justice and Rule

Adventurer
I’d be very surprised if they did that. One of the things that Lisa Stevens has cited in her review of the death of TSR and its influence on Paizo’s business model is that they fragmented their audience by releasing lots of setting books. For a game with a small audience (e.g., Pathfinder), having two books with fewer sales individually but more total than one can be worse financially due to higher unit costs for smaller print runs.

How can 5e do it but not Paizo? 5e has an extremely large audience. WotC can do things that smaller publishers cannot. WotC has also avoided flooding the market with setting books. They haven’t created separate lines for them. They have so far released one book for a setting and then moving onto the next thing while leaving GM’s Guild to fill in the gaps.

Yeah, WOTC has basically settled on FR as their setting, with a little bit of extra with Theros and Eberron.
 

TwoSix

Unserious gamer
Supporter
Yeah, WOTC has basically settled on FR as their setting, with a little bit of extra with Theros and Eberron.
I don't know if I'd go that far; Ravenloft is going to be their 6th setting book. (FR, Ravnica, Wildemount, Theros, Eberron.)

I think one thing that might be different is that people tend to run shorter campaigns nowadays; my one group has already run games in Curse of Strahd, Ravnica, and Eberron all in the last 3 years. I think there's more encouragement to try a setting than to choose one.
 


dave2008

Legend
A new D&D book being #1 in D&D isn't surprising. I think they'd be doing something very wrong if that wasn't the case.

They all do that pretty much automatically -- people pre-order them sight unseen. I'm not convinced that it being a setting book made a difference.
The success of Ravenloft was just background for why a thought about a PF setting. I don't care about the success of Ravenloft, what I care about is if a new setting for PF2 would be a good thing or not
 

thullgrim

Explorer
I think if they could leverage a setting to build showcase something dynamic in the rule set it might be worth doing. I almost think if you go down that road it should be a starfinder pf2 and consolidate rules development under one system
 

Retreater

Legend
You know what I would buy? An awesome 3PP Pathfinder 2e mega-adventure (similar to Curse of Strahd), divorced from Golarian (which I don't especially care about). Something that actually is built from the ground-up to support PF2, to reflect the rules in the world. Not a vanilla kitchen sink setting that was written for a system that came out 20 years ago.
Something like how Ptolus or Eberron came out in 3rd edition. Or Points of Light/Nentir Vale in 4E.
 


dave2008

Legend
I’d be very surprised if they did that. One of the things that Lisa Stevens has cited in her review of the death of TSR and its influence on Paizo’s business model is that they fragmented their audience by releasing lots of setting books. For a game with a small audience (e.g., Pathfinder), having two books with fewer sales individually but more total than one can be worse financially due to higher unit costs for smaller print runs.

How can 5e do it but not Paizo? 5e has an extremely large audience. WotC can do things that smaller publishers cannot. WotC has also avoided flooding the market with setting books. They haven’t created separate lines for them. They have so far released one book for a setting and then moving onto the next thing while leaving GM’s Guild to fill in the gaps.
I guess since I always here people clamoring for more settings for D&D, I think there might be a market for it in PF. I think they could make a new setting(s) and avoid the fragmentation to plagued TSR.
 

I don't know if I'd go that far; Ravenloft is going to be their 6th setting book. (FR, Ravnica, Wildemount, Theros, Eberron.)
WotC releases a new setting and then, that's it. There's no new Theros content coming outside of DMs Guild. Ravenloft and Eberron getting two whole products is the anomaly. Everything else is set in the Realms or easily could be (Ghosts of Saltmarsh).

In contrast, even TSR's limited run settings ran three or more releases. Jakandor may have been the only setting to have gotten so few, in fact.

Having six settings, each with five to 10 books on bookstore shelves, is a lot more cannibalization of the buying audience.
 

WotC releases a new setting and then, that's it. There's no new Theros content coming outside of DMs Guild. Ravenloft and Eberron getting two whole products is the anomaly. Everything else is set in the Realms or easily could be (Ghosts of Saltmarsh).

In contrast, even TSR's limited run settings ran three or more releases. Jakandor may have been the only setting to have gotten so few, in fact.

Having six settings, each with five to 10 books on bookstore shelves, is a lot more cannibalization of the buying audience.
I wonder if that is a model pathfinder could follow? If it works for Ravnica and Theros, cold Paizo come up with something new for PF2?
 



dave2008

Legend
WotC releases a new setting and then, that's it. There's no new Theros content coming outside of DMs Guild.
Maybe that is the something they need to look at - a community content market like DMsGuild. Honestly I think the WotC model of a single setting book with DMsGuild handling the rest is a great way to get a lot of settings out without cannibalizing your book line. Maybe Paizo should think about doing something similar.
 

Maybe that is the something they need to look at - a community content market like DMsGuild. Honestly I think the WotC model of a single setting book with DMsGuild handling the rest is a great way to get a lot of settings out without cannibalizing your book line. Maybe Paizo should think about doing something similar.
There's certainly enough passion among Pathfinder devotees. White Wolf has a similar system to the DMs Guild and it seems to have produced a ton of content for fans.
 

Staffan

Adventurer
Maybe that is the something they need to look at - a community content market like DMsGuild. Honestly I think the WotC model of a single setting book with DMsGuild handling the rest is a great way to get a lot of settings out without cannibalizing your book line. Maybe Paizo should think about doing something similar.
I mean, they already release everything mechanical under the OGL. They just don't have a convenient community showcase like the DM's Guild. And I'm not sure how much that aspect of the Guild helps (compared to just being able to do D&D stuff without having to concern yourself with the legalities of the OGL).

A bigger issue when it comes to third-party stuff for Pathfinder 2 is that most of the stuff you could do for Pathfinder, you could probably do for D&D instead, and the potential D&D audience is at least an order of magnitude larger than the one for Pathfinder 2.
 

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