Is the Wall of Faithless in 5e?

I would say it is still part of the standard FR campaign setting, but it is not part of 5e itself, and in 5e there is no "canon".
 

Leatherhead

Possibly a Idiot.
According to the Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide: Yes, the Wall of the Faithless still stands.

Souls that are unclaimed by the servants of the gods are judged by Kelemvor, who decides the fate of each one. Some are charged with serving as guides for other lost souls, while others are transformed into squirming larvae and cast into the dust. The truly false and faithless are mortared into the Wall of the Faithless, the great barrier that bounds the City of the Dead, where their souls slowly dissolve and begin to become part of the stuff of the Wall itself.
 

Mecheon

Explorer
It was an innovative and darkly comedic idea
That you, Mrykul?
Having a lack of faith having consequences could have had more nuance and more meaning. Not something that reads as if the edgiest edgelord wrote it.
The one good use of the Wall of the Faithless was NWN 2, Mask of the Betrayer. See the character of Kaelyn the Dove, former Doomguide of Kelemvor turned leader of the Second Crusade to tear down the Wall of the Faithless and a key player in the Third Crusade
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
According to the Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide: Yes, the Wall of the Faithless still stands.
That’s a decent departure from “if you served no god you go to the wall”, but is still literally semi-eternal punishment for just...not having “faith”. Gross.
Cheers bruv. Found it. Page 20.
The SCAG does contain a lot of stupid shite.
Most FR sourcebooks do.
To each their own, but the idea that faith, or rather the lack thereof having consequences is an appealing notion to me.
Atheists and disinterested agnostics being tortured in the afterlife appeals to you? Seriously? Cosmically enforced “faith” at the threat of being dissolved into a wall has appeal?

Really!?
 

DWChancellor

Kobold Enthusiast
Atheists and disinterested agnostics being tortured in the afterlife appeals to you? Seriously? Cosmically enforced “faith” at the threat of being dissolved into a wall has appeal?

Really!?
The Gods are obviously real, they're obviously super powerful, and they make no bones about being in charge of what happens to you after you die. If the Gods are remotely like people, you can imagine they wouldn't look to kindly on mortal souls who deny them. Being an atheist or agnostic in D&D is nothing like in real life.

Worse, loose souls are the equivalent of barrels of gunpowder laying around. Devils use them as tank-fuel (not to mention just plain warping souls into devils), etc. So you could think of the wall as a toxic waste disposal system. If you're a big jerk like Myrkul, you'd render some punishment (again, mortals know this wall exists!) If you're Kelemvor, maybe I don't see Kelemvor letting this be so awful. But it is up to the God of death who gets the first crack at these souls. And generally the god of Death isn't interested in letting a big stream of unclaimed soul-power getting lose.

If I recall right, part of the (4E?) Raven Queen's issue was fending off planar soul thieves for just this sort of reason.

It makes a certain internal sense at least. If you want to say the D&D authors are being mean to RL people who are atheists and agnostics, well... they can play D&D without gods and the wall.
 

Nagol

Unimportant
Perhaps I'm misremembering, but it not just belief in the gods, every person who didn't specifically pick a patron deity ended up in the wall which I thought was mean.

"I think the gods are real and I pray to A when I do X, and B when I do Y because those are the ones in charge of the domains of X and Y! Which one is my patron? I don't deserve a patron; I never had to choose! What do you mean I'm consigned to the wall!"
 

DWChancellor

Kobold Enthusiast
Perhaps I'm misremembering, but it not just belief in the gods, every person who didn't specifically pick a patron deity ended up in the wall which I thought was mean.
That's exactly what Myrkul (an evil git for sure) did. He declared those souls as stateless and tortured them out of existence. I'm trying to remember, but I thought Kelemvor's motivation to ascend was because he was so unhappy with Myrkul's attitude. Also all the general weirdness with Cyric.
 

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