1E Keep On The Borderline

Aldarc

Adventurer
Keep on the Borderlands is that song that keeps getting covered, remixed, and sampled by artist after artist, decade after decade. You look at the original and you may not think much of it - its not as hip as contemporaneous standards - but it nevertheless endures as a font of nostalgia, inspiration, and innovation. It probably even exemplifies the 4e design concept of the "point of light" campaign, where a small speck of law, order, and civilization was opposed by a chaotic, untamed wilderness.
 

Lanefan

Victoria Rules
I'd been playing/DMing for well over 25 years before any exposure to KotB other than reading through it - never played it, never ran it.

So in 2008 for my then-new campaign I said "Dammit - I'm starting them out with KotB come what may! I'll finally get to run this thing!". I gave the Keep a name, plonked it in the foothills of a mountain range in my setting, gave the monsters a vague reason for being where they were, plugged in a few wilderness encounters, and dropped the puck.

And as fate would have it my players - mostly unintentionally - played into this perfectly. The way they formed the party was to have a Bard (and a Cavalier who was there too) roll up-country bragging about how they were going to get into Great Adventures In the Mountains, and how anyone with courage and daring should join them - and one by one they recruited a party from the villages they passed through. Then they get to Holtus (the name I'd given the Keep) and ask what Grand Adventuring needed doing, and are told (in broad terms) of the Caves, though the people of Holtus were as yet unaware just how populated things had become out there.

The rest was history. Or hysteria. Actually, both. :) Many a fine fresh-faced adventurer met his or her end in those woods...
 

Lanefan

Victoria Rules
As for the other modules mentioned:

I've never touched Castle Amber as written, other than to read it. I played through a modified version of it in a 3e game; and when I DMed it I had to rewrite it from scratch (other than the maps) as I had some players who otherwise knew it too well. But I really like it as a module.

Not a fan of Tomb of Horrors, though I can say I've been in a group that beat it using only the stock characters given in the module. I'll probably only ever use it as a source of nasty traps for other places, sort of like a pre-Grimtooth Grimtooth booklet. :)

And my only other serious exposure to the B-series has been B-10 Night's Dark Terror - I've DMed it twice over the years. The first time went horribly, the second time not so bad but still less than it probably could have been; and I think both times my primary mistake was to not use its setting as the starting point of a campaign so I could interweave all its various elements into the game right from day 1.
 

Azzy

Cyclone Ranger
Keep on the Borderlands is that song that keeps getting covered, remixed, and sampled by artist after artist, decade after decade. You look at the original and you may not think much of it - its not as hip as contemporaneous standards - but it nevertheless endures as a font of nostalgia, inspiration, and innovation. It probably even exemplifies the 4e design concept of the "point of light" campaign, where a small speck of law, order, and civilization was opposed by a chaotic, untamed wilderness.
Great, you just implied that KotB is the equivalent of the song Hallelujah... The original is understated, but it has been covered brilliantly (but usually poorly) by many artist—many putting their own spin on it (but most just coloring by numbers and giving it no depth). And it's been so done to death (typically poorly) that you twitch whenever you hear someone new cover it.
 

Aldarc

Adventurer
Great, you just implied that KotB is the equivalent of the song Hallelujah... The original is understated, but it has been covered brilliantly (but usually poorly) by many artist—many putting their own spin on it (but most just coloring by numbers and giving it no depth). And it's been so done to death (typically poorly) that you twitch whenever you hear someone new cover it.
I'm a fan of the original Leonard Cohen version and the John Cale cover, whose arrangement has probably been the greatest influence on subsequent covers.
 

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