M.A.R. Barker, author of Tekumel, also author of Neo-Nazi book?

Ancalagon

Dusty Dragon

Based on this post, which I was not able to verify, Barker also wrote a novel called "Serpent's Walk", which has the, ah, interesting description of

"Survivors of the losing side from World War 2 form an underground resistance and make a long-term plan to challenge the new establishment. They adopt many of the tactics that were used against them before the war. They covertly started buying media power and building economic muscle. And after 100 years they make their move. The result is a conflict of critical importance and of enormous proportions; aconflict they simply cannot lose if they are to survive."

The author of this book is "Randolph Calverhall", which I imagine is a nom-de-plume? edit: It has been claimed it's the name of an important ancestor of him.

This is a "breaking story" and I hope others can help shed light on this.

edit: the Tekumel Foundation confirmed it :(
 
Last edited:

log in or register to remove this ad



Parmandur

Book-Friend
are you saying you aren't surprised by the news? If so, why so? (I am not super familiar with Tekumel). If not, I'm not sure what you are implying.
I am both surprised and not-surprised, if that makes sense? Or, disappointed, but not surprised.

The Venn diagram between European/American adherants to his type esoteric, eclectic philosophy and Fascist ideas is not a circle, but it has overlap.
 
Last edited:

Alzrius

The EN World kitten
Some Googling suggests that "Randolph D. Calverhall" is supposed to be an ancestor of Barker's. I can't find any corroboration for that, or anything else that conclusively puts him as being the author of the novel in question.

The post in the OP links to a messageboard thread which references a paper about Barker. While the paper makes no explicit mention of the novel, it mentions a pseudonymous work, expounding on this in footnote 25:

Discussing this novel posed an ethical dilemma. The work is clearly Barker’s – not only does his share his writing style and interests, but it is published in the name of one of his ancestors. (It is also attributed to him in at least one library catalogue.) It refers extensively to the Muslim and South Asian heritage, including a quotation from an eleventh-century Arabic tome on warfare, and dialogue about the esoteric cosmology of Ibn ʿArabi, and the theory of the “divine attributes of majesty and beauty” (asma al-jalal wa al-jalal). Hence, any discussion of the intersection of Barker’s beliefs and writing should include this work. This novel has actually been discussed more extensively in academic literature than his Tekumel novels, and, in my view, the writing is superior. However, the novel explores potentially inflammatory political viewpoints, and it was impressed upon me that it was best to preserve the facade of anonymity. I thus will leave it to the interested reader to dig it up – as Barker himself said, “Dig, dig, dig!” (See note 31.)

I've seen a few other references to this online, but nothing more conclusive than what's alleged in the post the OP reproduced here.

EDIT: With regard to tying the name "Randolph D. Calverhall" to Barker, I registered for the messageboard linked to in the quote the OP provides. Viewing the original post, the person also says the following: "Phil also left some big fat clues in the book. The name on the cover is the founder of his Shropshire family, the protagonist's heraldic arms are those of the Barker family, and the protagonist is married to a Pakistani women."
 
Last edited:

Tonguez

A suffusion of yellow
Barker became a muslim didnt he? Not that it should preclude him also having National-Socialist sympathies.

I understand the story is sci-fi and involves survivors of the SS gaining control of Media and Commerce to then start their war against “Jews and Democrats“ (thats on the back cover) - prophetic considering current politic…
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
Barker became a muslim didnt he? Not that it should preclude him also having National-Socialist sympathies.

I understand the story is sci-fi and involves survivors of the SS gaining control of Media and Commerce to then start their war against “Jews and Democrats“ (thats on the back cover) - prophetic considering current politic…
Occultism and esotericism are Fascist adjacent, historically...
 

Ancalagon

Dusty Dragon
I have been looking for firmer evidence and I have been informed of an academic paper, "Muhammad Abd al-Rahman (Phillip) Barker: Bridging Cultural Divides through Fantasy/ Science-Fiction Role-Playing Games and Fictional Religion" by Amina Inloes.

The paper, frustratingly, alludes to this but is unwilling to say it:

Additionally, Barker published five novels set in his game world: The Man of Gold (1984), Flamesong (1987), Lords of Tsamra (2003), Prince of Skulls (2002), and A Death of Kings (2003), as well as a pseudonymous novel.25

note 25 says:
25 Discussing this novel posed an ethical dilemma. The work is clearly Barker’s – not only does his share
his writing style and interests, but it is published in the name of one of his ancestors. (It is also attributed to
him in at least one library catalogue.) It refers extensively to the Muslim and South Asian heritage, including
a quotation from an eleventh-century Arabic tome on warfare, and dialogue about the esoteric cosmology
of Ibn (
Arabı¯, and the theory of the “divine attributes of majesty and beauty” (asma¯) al-jala¯l wa al-jama¯l).
Hence, any discussion of the intersection of Barker’s beliefs and writing should include this work. This
novel has actually been discussed more extensively in academic literature than his Tekumel novels, and, in
my view, the writing is superior. However, the novel explores potentially inflammatory political viewpoints,
and it was impressed upon me that it was best to preserve the fac¸ade of anonymity. I thus will leave it to
the interested reader to dig it up – as Barker himself said, “Dig, dig, dig!”

:/
 



Remove ads

AD6_gamerati_skyscraper

Remove ads

Recent & Upcoming Releases

Top