"Modern" things in your game?


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Storminator

First Post
Distilled beverages.

Typically, my players use the scientific method for problem solving. No one ever accepts "because the gods will it" as an answer anymore. :)

PS
 
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LiKral

First Post
I have always felt sceptical of the "everyone was filthy and covered in sores and dung" view of mediaeval life. If you go to countries where they live in a mediaeval way these days, I bet they are not like that (not that I travel myself, but some people here probably do?).
Even if they were unhygienic, it was confined to England and similar places, and was a cultural thing - bathing was seen as unlucky and unhealthy. Other cultures had different views. So a fantasy land does not have to have the peculiar views of Europe in 1500AD on personal hygiene - it is a different place altogether. It is only relevant for games that take place in a fantasy version of Europe.
Still, most D&D adventurers in games I have played had one set of clothes and never washed.
 

LiKral

First Post
As for anachronisms, my boyfriend always tries to invent things like the internal combustion engine and gunpowder in any mediaeval game he plays in. I've known others who try to do this kind of thing.
 

Silver Moon

Adventurer
Anachronisms - They main adventuring party has adventured in modern worlds a few times and have brought things back. Nothing to really unbalance the game, just stuff like sunglasses, sneakers and wristwatches. One player also has a jeep, but since they live on an island it isn't used all that much (but did get used for great fun once when the island was attacked).
 

STARP_President

First Post
My previous campaign incorporated a lot of modern things; the city was closer to modern New York than a mediaeval metropolis. For example:

  • Every afternoon there was an afternoon sporting event very similar to soccer
  • The city government was very American in style, with an elected chief executive
  • Carriages carried stickers on their rears, reading, for example 'My other carriage is a royal coach.'
  • There was almost total gender equality.
  • The days of the week and months of the year were the same as ours.

I could say more. The bumper stickers were the cool bit.

In my new campaign, it is much closer to traditional fantasy, although in many ways it is futuristic - ships have access to a lot of magic you might find aboard a starship, like magic mirrors to communicate with, gems that let you talk to one another, and teleportation devices. The whole point of my present campaign was to produce the spirit of sci-fi without space, so all that is acceptable.
 

Raven Crowking

First Post
LiKral said:
Even if they were unhygienic, it was confined to England and similar places, and was a cultural thing - bathing was seen as unlucky and unhealthy. Other cultures had different views. So a fantasy land does not have to have the peculiar views of Europe in 1500AD on personal hygiene - it is a different place altogether. It is only relevant for games that take place in a fantasy version of Europe.
Still, most D&D adventurers in games I have played had one set of clothes and never washed.

LOL. Two sessions ago, one character in my group discovered that they could rent a bath and have their clothes washed. Items could be mended and replaced. First time in seven (game) months. The other characters were quick to belly up.

RC
 

D+1

First Post
Only a few of these are actually problems in my games - and that to a very small degree. ;)
  1. Gender equality
  2. Racial equality
  3. A monarchy - even an autocracy or dictatorship - constantly behaving as if it were a democracy
  4. Legal systems (precedent, theory, and organization)
  5. Philosophy (too much shockingly modern morals and ethics)
  6. Military strategy & organization
  7. Economics (macro-, that is to say that trade, especially long-distance trade, is VASTLY overrepresented)
  8. Diplomacy & international relations
  9. Politics in general (vastly more representative government and bureaucracy than should be)
That's all I can think of off the top of my head.
 

Buttercup

Princess of Florin
LiKral said:
Still, most D&D adventurers in games I have played had one set of clothes and never washed.
:eek: Really? My players are happy to pay top dollar for a hot bath. Generally they use prestidigitation to keep their clothes and selves clean, but when it's available, they all like a good long soak. Now the clothing, that depends on the character. I've had players role play shopping trips for fancy dress, and in my present group, now that they have a bag of holding, they can afford the weight of changes of clothing.
 

VirgilCaine

First Post
STARP_President said:
My previous campaign incorporated a lot of modern things; the city was closer to modern New York than a mediaeval metropolis. For example:

[*]Every afternoon there was an afternoon sporting event very similar to soccer.

Maybe every sunday or every month there'd be a game of some kind--there were several different medieval games similar to soccer but with fewer rules.
 

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