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Release Monte Cook’s Numenera setting comes to 5e with Beneath the Monolith

Beneath the Monolith brings the setting of award-winning science-fantasy RPG Numenera to the Fifth Edition ruleset!

Take your wizard, ranger, and rogue to the Amber Monolith, across the Cloudcrystal Skyfields, and to other wonders of the Ninth World.

The Ninth World:
They say there have been eight worlds before ours. Eight times the people of this planet, over vast millennia, built their civilizations, reaching heights we cannot even fully imagine now. They spoke to the stars, reshaped the creatures of the world, and mastered form and essence. They built cities and machines that have since crumbled to dust, leaving only their barest remnants.

This is the Ninth World. The people of the prior worlds are gone—scattered, disappeared, or transcended. But their works remain, in the places and devices that still contain some germ of their original function. To the ignorant, these workings of the ancients are magic. But the wise know differently …
The Ninth World is the setting of Monte Cook’s multiple-award-winning Numenera RPG. Beneath the Monolith brings this critically acclaimed world to 5e. Explore the ruins of incomprehensible civilizations. Discover the numenera, ancient technologies so advanced that most people think they’re just magic. Encounter creatures weird, fierce, and dangerous. Open doors to new worlds and alternate dimensions. And, perhaps, unlock some of the mysteries of the prior worlds.

This is one of our most-requested releases—5e fans, come visit the Ninth World!

Beneath-the-Monolith-Cover.jpg


Our first 5e release, Arcana of the Ancients, will help you get the most of this book. It contains loads of cyphers, artifacts, creatures, and additional content that brings a Ninth World campaign to life, along with great advice and information on running weird science-fantasy games in 5e.
 

Nebulous

Legend
I haven't actually run Numenera before, how does the ruleset compare to 5e? It seems very different. I just wonder if the original is catered more to the setting, and slapping 5e on it will just muddle things...
 

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Nebulous

Legend
I actually have the 2e slipcase edition in hardback, it set me back a pretty penny too, but that was before the pandemic and i still haven't played.
 

Let's just say I'm not a fan of everything jumping on the 5e bandwagon. We had that bubble burst in the early to mid naughties with everybody and their cat switching to d20.
Systems are best when they stand on their feet IMO. At some point the market will become over saturated again, with the looming recession, sooner rather than later at that, because people will be less inclined to buy stuff for the sake of ownership.
OTOH, if Monte Cook and Privateer Press feel like a 5E adaptation will help keep the lights on, that gives them a better chance of surviving the recession.

The third party marketplace is also in a much different place than in the 3E era, which had the same sort of gold rush mentality, and comparable quality, to the Atari gold rush in the 1980s. This time around, it's mostly small, crowdfunded stuff, PDF stuff or stuff put out by mature companies that survived the 3E boom and bust.
 

dalisprime

Explorer
The main difference between the current situation and what happened back in the early 2000's is that there won't be shelf space occupied by lesser quality products. Now everything is handled via PDF and/or kickstarter orders.

But I do agree with you with products being converted from a proprietary system to a "generic" one just to ride on the popularity of a game system, be it 3.x, PF1 or 5e, is a bad decision. It won't help the sale of the other line as often times the conversion process is either too complicated system-wise or needs to rebalance every encounter in case of adventures/campaigns.

They do still flood game store shelves though. My FLGS has scores of RPG books that don't ever seem to move off the shelves. The other FLGS puts ttRPG books on sale on a regular basis just to shift them. It may not appear as prevalent, but in my perception the bubble is very much growing and it's a matter of time before it bursts. The biggest issue now is crowdfunding - the output from that source alone is far greater than it ever has been.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I haven't actually run Numenera before, how does the ruleset compare to 5e? It seems very different. I just wonder if the original is catered more to the setting, and slapping 5e on it will just muddle things...

There are lots of differences, but the key mechanical one is:
You almost always modify the DC, not the roll.

In other words, there are 10 levels of difficulty, each creating a DC of difficulty x 3 (so if you are at difficulty 5, it's DC15). (btw, they don't call it DC, they call it something else [Edited to add: They call it "Difficulty" 🙃 ]). If you spend effort, or you have a skill in that thing you are rolling for, then the DC drops by a difficulty level or two or three. So if you spend effort, and are skilled, your DC drops from 15 down to 9. So the GM is figuring out all the DCs in their head.
The player just says they do this thing and then they roll. They don't have to add anything up. If they hit the number or beat it, they succeed.

There's a bunch more that's different (GM never rolls dice for example); but that core mechanic is how it differs from 5e.

I'm still not actually sure the different rules set actually is "better" for me. It still feels fiddly, and deciding to spend effort is a mechanical bit that takes me out of the fiction and doesn't seem to really add to the narrative flow that we could have going. "I try real hard" all the time doesn't seem very fictionally exciting. But that may be how we are playing it...

The setting though, that's smoking awesome.
 
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seankreynolds

Explorer
Yup. Got mine, lovely book. My issue with MCG Kickstarter's though is for the rest of the year I'll be waiting for the rest of the books, one at a time, shipping each time. Four shipments, it's a drawn out process to be sure. I also backed the Ptolus Kickstarter as well, went all in. I think though that's going to be my last one because their Kickstarter's are so frustrating. Where as Steve Jackson Games, Ballistic Games or your Judge Dredd Kickstarter were painless affairs.

Hi, I'm Sean, and I'm a designer/developer for Monte Cook Games. :)
We guarantee that we'll have your books available for you for at least a year, so if you want to wait to get them all at once, that's totally fine--a lot of people do that to save on shipping costs!
 

Retreater

Legend
There are lots of differences, but the key mechanical one is:
You almost always modify the DC, not the roll.

In other words, there are 10 levels of difficulty, each creating a DC of difficulty x 3 (so if you are at difficulty 5, it's DC15). (btw, they don't call it DC, they call it something else). If you spend effort, or you have a skill in that thing you are rolling for, then the DC drops by a difficulty level or two or three. So if you spend effort, and are skilled, your DC drops from 15 down to 9. So the GM is figuring out all the DCs in their head.
The player just says they do this thing and then they roll. They don't have to add anything up. If they hit the number or beat it, they succeed.

There's a bunch more that's different (GM never rolls dice for example); but that core mechanic is how it differs from 5e.

I'm still not actually sure the different rules set actually is "better" for me. It still feels fiddly, and deciding to spend effort is a mechanical bit that takes me out of the fiction and doesn't seem to really add to the narrative flow that we could have going. "I try real hard" all the time doesn't seem very fictionally exciting. But that may be how we are playing it...

The setting though, that's smoking awesome.

I greatly disliked the mechanics of the system, but I like the setting idea. I've played several different characters with a variety of GMs, including home games and con games (in MCG-sanctioned events). Low level characters basically have "one good thing" they can do - no variety of attacks or abilities. In every game my character was worthless because of the high DR creatures featured in nearly every combat were impervious to anything but a fighter's (glaive's) attack. The "really cool stuff" about my characters never came up. The artifacts/cyphers never came up.

The rules are bad, bad, bad. Hopefully the conversion to 5e will help my opinion of the game experience.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I greatly disliked the mechanics of the system, but I like the setting idea. I've played several different characters with a variety of GMs, including home games and con games (in MCG-sanctioned events). Low level characters basically have "one good thing" they can do - no variety of attacks or abilities. In every game my character was worthless because of the high DR creatures featured in nearly every combat were impervious to anything but a fighter's (glaive's) attack. The "really cool stuff" about my characters never came up. The artifacts/cyphers never came up.

The rules are bad, bad, bad. Hopefully the conversion to 5e will help my opinion of the game experience.

Huh. Interesting. One thing is you can spend Might effort to increase the damage. Which of course costs you your pool, so isn't sustainable.

But yeah, breaking all physical weapons into Light (2 dmg) and Heavy (4 dmg) seems a bit too simplistic, and having many monsters have DR of 2+ isn't great. I get where they were going - Numenara is not a gear-porn game. It's about exploration and this weird 9th world setting. Potentially they over simplified. I bet (have never researched) there's hacks out there doing more interesting stuff with combat and the damage math.

I agree with the low level characters only being able to do that ONE thing. But once you get to Tier 2, things spread out more. It might be useful for intro games to give players 2nd or 3rd tier characters, so they can do a few things...

Also, that your cypher's weren't useful sounds like a failure of GMing. If it was me running a 1 shot, I'd provide everyone at least one cypher that was useful-ish in the scenario.

It is tough, as a long-time D&D player, with the permanent magic items, to break my mindset away from "use this cypher at the most optimal time, as I won't have it ever again". What's been helping me on that front is basically saying "yolo" and trying to use them with in 2 sessions of getting them. Or trading them with someone else.

None of the above is to invalidate your experiences - if I had the same experience, I'd be pretty unhappy with the rules as I perceived them. And as I noted up thread, I'm still not 100% sold on the rules. I'm still not sure I understand what the emotional tenor of play should be; and I don't think the rules necessarily make that clear.
 

Paragon Lost

Terminally Lost
Supporter
Hi, I'm Sean, and I'm a designer/developer for Monte Cook Games. :)
We guarantee that we'll have your books available for you for at least a year, so if you want to wait to get them all at once, that's totally fine--a lot of people do that to save on shipping costs!

Think you're missing the point Sean. Don't get me wrong, I love MCG's products. Heck my wife just talked me into snagging the Invisible Sun black cube which I'd been sitting on the fence with since it came out for various reasons. So we snagged that along with the Bundle of Holding pdf of the Invisible Sun since it was one that was aiding Human Rights Watch, I just couldn't say no. So that means that we just spent $300.00 on MCG games in the last week alone. I tossed $500.00 in for the Ptolus Kickstarter, so I talk with my wallet.

My frustration with MCG Kickstarter's is the communication really lacks. Also the very long lead time on when a project actually ships which tends to be one year after the Kickstarter funds. I'm ok with that part, its the next six months to a year of getting "everything" which gets really old. So you could be looking at upwards of two years from the time the Kickstarter funds potently. That's a problem for me and it annoys me to no end.

Also the Kickstarter's are about the only way to get the PDF's thrown in with the physical product. MCG is a part of a small group of developers who doesn't toss in the PDF in with the physical product. So going with the Kickstarter is a nice thing for that reason, and then of course the desire to support superior products like MCG does. So I find myself always torn with backing a MCG Kickstarter.

Anyhow, I just wish you all operated slightly differently, maybe more efficiently. You, Monte, Shanna, Bruce, Darcy and the rest of the crew at MCG are some of my favorite folks. I follow you all on Twitter just and tend to find myself in agreement with things you all post. I want to support you all but I don't like how frustrating the Kickstarter's are. Keep up the awesome creative work that you all do.
 

Paragon Lost

Terminally Lost
Supporter
I like how the rules are
I greatly disliked the mechanics of the system, but I like the setting idea. I've played several different characters with a variety of GMs, including home games and con games (in MCG-sanctioned events). Low level characters basically have "one good thing" they can do - no variety of attacks or abilities. In every game my character was worthless because of the high DR creatures featured in nearly every combat were impervious to anything but a fighter's (glaive's) attack. The "really cool stuff" about my characters never came up. The artifacts/cyphers never came up.

The rules are bad, bad, bad. Hopefully the conversion to 5e will help my opinion of the game experience.
I like how the rules are really flexible. You can add in a lot more mechanically or complexity wise. Regardless of what some players/gms say on Reddit which I repeatedly see. That's not cypher system! Or you can't do Numenera that way! Poppycock, it's your game of course you can. If you want meatier mechanics, add em. You want encumbrance systems and survival mechanics, add em. Add variety etc, whether its combat or whatever. Basically I see the base mechanics systems as a good starting point. :)
 

Retreater

Legend
Right, @Paragon Lost and @Eyes of Nine , I'm sure the rules are very adaptable and can be expanded with some GM finesse. But I was a player in the games without the power to alter the rules. And given that the home GM I played with was extremely "by the book" because we were trying to learn a new system, and I'm assuming the MCG-sanctioned GMs at the Cons were also trying to present an authentic experience, I can only go by my experiences, which left much to be desired.
The last game I played I was a Nanos (basically a wizard, for those unfamiliar with the game). We were intro level adventurers in a game run at last year's Origins. I had a light weapon (2 damage). Monster had - I think - DR 5. My character, burning his Might to do more damage would succeed only in depleting his HP so low he would be killed.
Then he had something like a less impressive version of the 0-level 5e spell firebolt. He could ramp it up a couple of times by draining his Intellect pool, but it was basically going to do nothing against the monster at its base value, and limited even if supercharged. And that was it. That was every option my character had.
And you can say "this is a bad designed adventure." This was an official Con game from MCG. There was no way to avoid the fight. And this has happened in every session of Numenera I've played (which has been around 6).
 

Paragon Lost

Terminally Lost
Supporter
Right, @Paragon Lost and @Eyes of Nine , I'm sure the rules are very adaptable and can be expanded with some GM finesse. But I was a player in the games without the power to alter the rules. And given that the home GM I played with was extremely "by the book" because we were trying to learn a new system, and I'm assuming the MCG-sanctioned GMs at the Cons were also trying to present an authentic experience, I can only go by my experiences, which left much to be desired.
The last game I played I was a Nanos (basically a wizard, for those unfamiliar with the game). We were intro level adventurers in a game run at last year's Origins. I had a light weapon (2 damage). Monster had - I think - DR 5. My character, burning his Might to do more damage would succeed only in depleting his HP so low he would be killed.
Then he had something like a less impressive version of the 0-level 5e spell firebolt. He could ramp it up a couple of times by draining his Intellect pool, but it was basically going to do nothing against the monster at its base value, and limited even if supercharged. And that was it. That was every option my character had.
And you can say "this is a bad designed adventure." This was an official Con game from MCG. There was no way to avoid the fight. And this has happened in every session of Numenera I've played (which has been around 6).

I find myself frequently irked at the "No! You have to play it this way and this way only otherwise it's not Numenera!" Crowd. I feel that they're stifling the growth of the Cypher system with that mindset. I've seen it with other rpgs as well on Reddit that I follow. It's a terrible mindset, it stifles creativity and growth. The rules are meant to be a guide in any rpg you play. Being consistent and fair is important and the only time playing by the rules exactly as written is important is when you are playing via The Pathfinders Society or Adventurer's League which both have certain hard rules.
 

Nebulous

Legend
I greatly disliked the mechanics of the system, but I like the setting idea. I've played several different characters with a variety of GMs, including home games and con games (in MCG-sanctioned events). Low level characters basically have "one good thing" they can do - no variety of attacks or abilities. In every game my character was worthless because of the high DR creatures featured in nearly every combat were impervious to anything but a fighter's (glaive's) attack. The "really cool stuff" about my characters never came up. The artifacts/cyphers never came up.

The rules are bad, bad, bad. Hopefully the conversion to 5e will help my opinion of the game experience.
I haven't played, but it seems like the GMs weren't using cyphers correctly, which greatly boost what characters can do and add a pseudo-magic element to everyone.
 

Nebulous

Legend
Right, @Paragon Lost and @Eyes of Nine , I'm sure the rules are very adaptable and can be expanded with some GM finesse. But I was a player in the games without the power to alter the rules. And given that the home GM I played with was extremely "by the book" because we were trying to learn a new system, and I'm assuming the MCG-sanctioned GMs at the Cons were also trying to present an authentic experience, I can only go by my experiences, which left much to be desired.
The last game I played I was a Nanos (basically a wizard, for those unfamiliar with the game). We were intro level adventurers in a game run at last year's Origins. I had a light weapon (2 damage). Monster had - I think - DR 5. My character, burning his Might to do more damage would succeed only in depleting his HP so low he would be killed.
Then he had something like a less impressive version of the 0-level 5e spell firebolt. He could ramp it up a couple of times by draining his Intellect pool, but it was basically going to do nothing against the monster at its base value, and limited even if supercharged. And that was it. That was every option my character had.
And you can say "this is a bad designed adventure." This was an official Con game from MCG. There was no way to avoid the fight. And this has happened in every session of Numenera I've played (which has been around 6).
I admit, after six times of trying a game and not liking it, I would hate it too.
 

seankreynolds

Explorer
My frustration with MCG Kickstarter's is the communication really lacks.

I'm not sure why you think that. Just for the Arcana of the Ancients Kickstarter (which BTM is part of), we've posted status updates on June 5th, April 14th, Feb 25, Jan 15, Oct 18 2019, Aug 9 2019, July 15 2019, and Jun 19 2019. Other than the gap around the holidays, that's an update about every six weeks on the status of the books in the project.

Also the very long lead time on when a project actually ships which tends to be one year after the Kickstarter funds. I'm ok with that part, its the next six months to a year of getting "everything" which gets really old. So you could be looking at upwards of two years from the time the Kickstarter funds potently. That's a problem for me and it annoys me to no end.

Well, I mean ... it takes time to write, develop, edit, layout, proof, print, and ship a book. The Kickstarter ended in April 12, 2019. AOTA is a 300-page book. If Bruce and I were writing at peak capacity (about 4 pages per day, which is really hard to maintain), with the work split equally between us, that's 37.5 work days just to get the bulk of the writing done. With about 20 work days per calendar month, that's two months right there, which puts us at June 12. Add in a couple of weeks for the creative director (Monte) to read it and give comments, another week for Bruce and I to make changes, and that's mid/late July. Then we lose about two weeks for Gen Con 2019, so that's mid-August. Add a month for editing, that's mid-September. A week for the managing editor and designers to review editor questions, that's late September. A month for layout (maybe, I don't know, I'm not a graphic designer, but it's a BIG book), that's late October. A couple of weeks to proof the layout file, that's mid-November. Roll the files over to the printer in China, hopefully it gets done before the Chinese New Year (when the printer shuts down for several weeks). Getting it on the boat from China to the US takes a month or more, including the variable time it takes for cargo crates to clear customs. We fulfilled PDFs to backers in early March in anticipation of shipping out physical copies to backers, and by mid-March we were shipping print copies to backers, and the book was live in our store on April 1st.

And that's if we started immediately as the Kickstarter closed, working at peak efficiency, no gaps or problems (like COVID-19, which shut down printing operations in China for a while, and also delayed shipments of things out of China). And we generally don't start writing as soon as the Kickstarter closes because we have other current projects that we're writing. So I understand there is a lead time and that's frustrating for you, but we really can't work any faster than this without sacrificing quality.

And for the next book in the series after AOTA (Beneath the Monolith), it's out now, only three months after AOTA became available, which is pretty impressive. We're working as fast as we can.

Also the Kickstarter's are about the only way to get the PDF's thrown in with the physical product. MCG is a part of a small group of developers who doesn't toss in the PDF in with the physical product. So going with the Kickstarter is a nice thing for that reason, and then of course the desire to support superior products like MCG does. So I find myself always torn with backing a MCG Kickstarter.

That's because PDFs have value. They're not a freebie, even though many people treat them like freebies. It's a $45 hardback book with a $18 PDF. There are people who only want PDFs, and they think $18 is a good value for that book. If buying the $45 hardback from our webstore got you the $18 PDF for free, what message does that send to the player who spends $18 on that "free" PDF? What message does that send to the brick-and-mortal retailer who sells the book for $45 and doesn't include the PDF? (It makes them not want to carry our books because there's a big incentive for people to buy it from our webstore and get the PDF for free.) So yes, backing the Kickstarter is a good deal because we're giving you the PDF as part of your print backer level--it's a thank-you for trusting us with your money in advance (a year in advance, or more) to make a good product.

And of course, our PDFs aren't just a text-and-copying-locked version of the print book—they're hyperlinked and bookmarked, which takes extra work.

I appreciate that the time to create a book is frustrating for you, and I appreciate that you back the Kickstarter because you like the products and the people at the company. But we really are working as fast as we can on these things. I write more per month at MCG than I did at Wizards (back in 2000 when I was a designer on Forgotten Realms, a designer was expected to finish ~32 pages of material per month and my sustainable MCG writing pace is about two to three times that) and I think I'm a better writer and designer now than I was then. It's okay if you feel that you wait too long for Kickstarter rewards and want to just buy them at retail once they become available.
 

seankreynolds

Explorer
Right, @Paragon Lost and @Eyes of Nine , I'm sure the rules are very adaptable and can be expanded with some GM finesse. But I was a player in the games without the power to alter the rules. And given that the home GM I played with was extremely "by the book" because we were trying to learn a new system, and I'm assuming the MCG-sanctioned GMs at the Cons were also trying to present an authentic experience, I can only go by my experiences, which left much to be desired.
The last game I played I was a Nanos (basically a wizard, for those unfamiliar with the game). We were intro level adventurers in a game run at last year's Origins. I had a light weapon (2 damage). Monster had - I think - DR 5. My character, burning his Might to do more damage would succeed only in depleting his HP so low he would be killed.
Then he had something like a less impressive version of the 0-level 5e spell firebolt. He could ramp it up a couple of times by draining his Intellect pool, but it was basically going to do nothing against the monster at its base value, and limited even if supercharged. And that was it. That was every option my character had.
And you can say "this is a bad designed adventure." This was an official Con game from MCG. There was no way to avoid the fight. And this has happened in every session of Numenera I've played (which has been around 6).

Retreater, I'd really like to figure out what adventure they were running for you, because if you were playing a tier 1 character, I'd be very surprised if the adventure had a creature with Armor 5 (considering that plate mail is Armor 3). And if it's an official MCG adventure, and that Armor 5 creature is in there, I'd like to take a look at the encounter and see if that's an error (or if there was something else your characters were supposed to be able to do). And as a starting Nano, I'd expect you to have the Onslaught ability, which is (your choice) a force blast that inflicts 4 damage (subject to Armor) or a psionic blast that inflicts 2 damage (which ignores Armor), so I'm wondering what's up with that (pregenerated?) character.
 


Von Ether

Adventurer
The last game I played I was a Nanos (basically a wizard, for those unfamiliar with the game). We were intro level adventurers in a game run at last year's Origins. I had a light weapon (2 damage). Monster had - I think - DR 5. My character, burning his Might to do more damage would succeed only in depleting his HP so low he would be killed.
Then he had something like a less impressive version of the 0-level 5e spell firebolt. He could ramp it up a couple of times by draining his Intellect pool, but it was basically going to do nothing against the monster at its base value, and limited even if supercharged. And that was it. That was every option my character had.

I'm not trying to change your mind, enjoy what you want to enjoy, but some of that sounds off. At most a monster had Armor "DR" of 3, so the 5 sounds weirdly off, especially for an intro game.

I assume you had Onslaught, which does 4 damage and, sure is only one point over but between cyphers (many which do good damage), other players, and one or two lucky rolls (a 17-20 can add 1-4 points of extra damage), could have probably taken an intro adventure monster down.

The pool/hp concept is one of the things that trips up people who already have exceptions of how RPG mechanics go. Most assume if you deplete one pool, you're dead (it's all the pools), Edge makes things cheaper (so either your Effort is cheaper or some of your powers are free) and you can also spend an Action to do a Recovery Roll (1d6+1)

An Intellect Edge and effort gave you two options:
  • Effort (3)+Onslaught (1) - Intellect Edge (1) is three points and does 7 points of damage; but you have to trust the die roll.
  • Effort (3)+Light Weapon is three points again and does 5 points of damage; but a light weapon gives you an asset and thus you traded off damage for extra accuracy
Do either one twice, let the Warrior slide in and do some crazy damage as you roll for a recovery as you eventually discover that Cypher characters are actually hard to kill. Odds are the monster would be finished by next round or two.*

I don't blame you for the bad taste in your mouth, but it seems something was a little off and the GM needed to help players understand the different expectations of the game.

Retreater, I'd really like to figure out what adventure they were running for you, because if you were playing a tier 1 character, I'd be very surprised if the adventure had a creature with Armor 5 (considering that plate mail is Armor 3). And if it's an official MCG adventure, and that Armor 5 creature is in there, I'd like to take a look at the encounter and see if that's an error (or if there was something else your characters were supposed to be able to do). And as a starting Nano, I'd expect you to have the Onslaught ability, which is (your choice) a force blast that inflicts 4 damage (subject to Armor) or a psionic blast that inflicts 2 damage (which ignores Armor), so I'm wondering what's up with that (pregenerated?) character.

I totally forgot the psionic version of Onslaught. Well, if I'm going to drop the ball, it's awesome when one the designers picks it up and runs with it. :D

*And this is for a first level character, even more options and levels of Effort open up as you play. I always say Cypher, power wise, is like D&D from 5th to 20th with a lot less math and overhead.
 
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Retreater

Legend
@seankreynolds I'll see if I can figure out the name of it, but I played it at Origins 2019, so it's been a while. I'll try to collect whatever information I can, but the only thing I really remember is the frustration at the whole experience and the hopelessness of a TPK that ended the entire group. (I may not remember the exact DR, but I do know that I couldn't harm the creature, nor could most of the other pregenerated characters). The adventure was kind of set up like a gladiator fight, if that helps.
 

Nebulous

Legend
I'm a little burned out from 5e, so the idea of a new system and setting is enticing, but not exactly the learning curve of knowing the system.
 

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