D&D 5E Most Underrated D&D Module

guachi

Hero
My vote is for B10: Night's Dark Terror.

It's a shockingly good adventure. I had purchased the collection B1-9:In Search of Adventure in 1987. Nine adventures for $15? Good deal for a 13 year-old! Also in 1987 I started buying the D&D Gazetteers and fell in love with the Known World. B10, published in 1986, however, was not something I purchased at the time. I didn't like the cover. I did eventually buy the $5 pdf (ebay copies are stupid expensive) two years ago.

It's not shown up on any "best of" lists that I'm aware of. At least, not on "best of" lists from magazines or websites. It has, on the other hand, gotten many positive comments from discussion forums like this one, which is why I was so eager to get it (as well as completing my Mystara line of products)

Many have, rightly, compared it to Lost Mines of Phandelver. It's an episodic adventure for low level characters. An AP for levels 1-5, if you will. The adventure, like LMoP also has some mini-adventures not related to the main plot, though they aren't as easily accessible. It took what was at the time a mostly blank slate of a country, Karameikos, and fleshed it out via module.

I've run it twice now and sucking the PCs into the slowly expanding plot (which I had tied into other external events to pique the PCs interest) is just so fun. Even my wife, who hates RPGs, said she "loved the story". The PCs always had a sense that their actions made a difference.

Sure, there is a bit of a railroad, but the players felt like they were heroes in a movie that were swept up in the adventure (like a good Star Wars movie, and my wife loves Star Wars).

I also had the PCs meet the plot hook NPC in their very first adventure as 0 XP level one PCs in the stereotypical "inn that adventurers hang out in to get adventuring ideas". They also met several other NPCs so it wasn't obvious that this guy was "Plot-Hook Man". They then rescued him in their second adventure, N1 Against the Cult of the Reptile God (thankfully not underrated), and he innocently said he wanted to reward them and invited them back to his and his brother's farmstead (little did they know what was in store).

Oh... I almost forgot to add that the adventure is a fantastic bridge from the dungeon settings of Basic levels 1-3 and the wilderness settings of Expert levels 4+. For 5e, it fits wonderfully as a bridge between Local Heroes (levels 1-4) and beginning Heroes of the Realm (levels 5-10)

It's $5 for the pdf (no Print on Demand yet). Or you can get B1-12 for $29. Cheap!

Go now and buy it.

What's your most underrated D&D module?
 
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Parmandur

Book-Friend
Tale of the Comet.

2e. A spaceship lands, and you investigate, and get some alien tech, but then go into space and fight aliens.


Say, I think that may have been referenced in Volo's Guide, were there Vegepygmies in that one...?

Hoard of the Dragon Queen: it has a deserved reputation for imperfection, but there is a lot of material here, and fun to be had used right.
 

Great question!

I have never liked Keep on the Borderlands or White Plume Mountain. Too randomly nonsensical for my tasted. Yet for some inexplicable reason I recently purchased 2E's Return to Keep on the Borderlands and Return to White Plume Mountain. And they're starting to grow on me. In fact, I may just mash them together into one mega adventure. They complement each other nicely. The story would go something like this: The Mountain is the lair of a deranged wizard. The Caves of Chaos guard the approach to the Mountain and are populated by the wizard's failed experiments, who are compelled to gather together for reasons they cannot fathom. The Keep itself acts as a long term home base for an expedition into the Mountain. There's enough story logic there to justify the gonzo elements of both adventures.
 

guachi

Hero
I should add that, this being a 5e forum and all, another reason I like Night's Dark Terror is that it's fairly easy to convert to 5e. Though I think that can be said for every 1e/2e/Basic lower level adventure I've looked at.
 

JonnyP71

Explorer
UK4 - When a Star Falls (another one in which Graeme Morris had an involvement).

I 1st bought it in 1987, and am only now running it for a group for the 1st time.

From a fantastic opening sequence (I copied all the memories to slips of paper and hurled them into the players' faces when the Memory Web died), to neatly designed encounter locations, stir in a liberal dose of roleplaying, and tie it together with the most interesting plot I've ever seen in a published adventure.

And it never appears on any of the 'best of' lists either. I guess the UK made adventures just didn't have the impact they should have done in the States - shame, as many of them were better than most of the stuff the US writers were churning out.
 

Say, I think that may have been referenced in Volo's Guide, were there Vegepygmies in that one...?

Hoard of the Dragon Queen: it has a deserved reputation for imperfection, but there is a lot of material here, and fun to be had used right.
Volo's is referencing Expedition to the Barrier Peaks, which is a classic (if odd) Greyhawk Adventure.
 

Will Doyle

Explorer
I guess the UK made adventures just didn't have the impact they should have done in the States - shame, as many of them were better than most of the stuff the US writers were churning out.

The UK mods were great. I'll throw in a vote for "UK6: All That Glitters...": a proper quest into the unknown, based on a fragmented treasure map. Great fun.
 


Wednesday Boy

The Nerd WhoFell to Earth
I say 2E's Dragon's Rest from the Dragonlance series. It didn't follow the War of the Lance main plot and took place in some other dimension. The characters would travel from this island (maybe in the Astral Plane) to other dimensions to recover MacGuffins. Then they would return to a random place on the astral island. My favorite part was the variety of the foes, challenges, and places for each segment of the module. The dimensions you went to and the places you returned to on the astral island were all different and interesting, so the module felt fresh every step of the way. And it culminates with an epic dragon-riding battle. I don't know if it holds up but it was my favorite D&D module to play in.
 



ccs

41st lv DM
One of my favorites is N2: The Forest Oracle.
Yes, it's a pretty terrible railroad & poorly written. It routinely ends up on "Worst of" lists.
And If you run it straight & invest no prep, well you'll have crap....

But the general plot is fine. So treat it like a rough outline & add your own flourishes and details.
 


JonnyP71

Explorer
When I saw the thread title, this was my first reaction. You don't hear a lot about these, but they were very good. I played my group through UK2 during the playtest, and it worked seamlessly

My 'newbie' group who recently suffered a near TPK in the main 5E campaign are currently playing some 1E - and enjoying it thus far...

They've just finished UK2, but are all level 3/4 so UK3 would be a massacre - hence the diversion to UK4 - to beef them up somewhat. Though I can see them struggling with some bits, as they still have some of the 5E 'Chaaaaarrggge, we can win this!' mindset. UK2 played really well, it's often looked on as the poor little-sibling to UK3, which is partially true as it sets the scene for The Gauntlet, but the Villa and the old Xvart Lair are both really nicely done, with some tough challenges to trap the unwary. It's amazing the damage a single Caterwaul can do if the party is jammed into twisty 5' wide tunnels.

Graeme Morris was probably the best module writer of the 80s, and was creating some truly innovative gems while over in the States Tracy Hickman was churning out the dross DL series.

When they did the 'top 30 modules' thing a few years ago I seem to remember U1 being the only British adventure in the top 30. U1, UK3 and UK4 should all have been in the top 5.
 
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JonnyP71

Explorer
My favorite modules that don't get enough love?

EX1 & 2 (the "Alice" modules). Back when D&D used to have a bit of fun, not nearly as heralded as Barrier Peaks. Delightfully weird.

X4 & 5 (Desert/Nomad modules). X1 & X2 deservedly get props, but these are fun modules.

In my opinion, X4 is the best of the entire X series, it's fantastic, and far overshadows X5,
 


jrowland

First Post
When I saw the thread title, this was my first reaction. You don't hear a lot about these, but they were very good. I played my group through UK2 during the playtest, and it worked seamlessly


Same here. My vote is UK2 and UK3. Alderweg Keep is fixture in many campaigns I've run, such a great "low level" base of operations. I've had PCs take over as Lords, or simply be honored permanent guests, etc.
 

TerraDave

5ever, or until 2024
B4: The Lost City

Meet strange mask wearing factions members in a very weird pyramid. Huge scope for customization and expansion. Lots of RP potential. Pulpy theme and final boss monster.
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
B4: The Lost City

Meet strange mask wearing factions members in a very weird pyramid. Huge scope for customization and expansion. Lots of RP potential. Pulpy theme and final boss monster.

I don't know if I'd call that underrated. It's one of the go-to modules people bring up when talking about great D&D old school adventures.
 

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