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D&D 5E Multiclassing--Which and Why?

What is your favorite style of multiclassing?

  • Classic Multiclassing

    Votes: 21 18.6%
  • Classic Dual-classing

    Votes: 4 3.5%
  • 3e Multiclassing

    Votes: 44 38.9%
  • 3e Gestalt

    Votes: 7 6.2%
  • 4e Multiclass Feats

    Votes: 20 17.7%
  • 4e Hybrid

    Votes: 17 15.0%

trancejeremy

Adventurer
Classic for me.

3.x multiclassing to me is broken on several different levels.

Mechnically, which is why there had to be kludge prestige classes like the Mystic Theurge

Logically. I just leveled up after I was in an adventure as a fighter, so now I can take a level in any other class, despite no training or practice.

And gaming wise, it just encourages character optimization. People don't play characters, they play "builds".
 

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I'm A Banana

Potassium-Rich
Am I the only one with a soft spot for Gestalt?

"Here. Have another class. Think it's too powerful? Give it to your monsters, too. Throw bigger things at them. Too much for you? Can't handle the awesome? Well, go have a lie down, Nancy, these magical gumdrop elves are for CERTIFIED BADASSES ONLY."

Okay, yeah, not the easiest thing to balance in the world, but a lot of fun anyway. ;)
 


Obryn

Hero
For me, D&D is about archetypes. Class should be the #1 defining feature of a D&D character. 3.x is the outlier here; while it's a fun pseudo-point-buy system, I prefer it when multiclassing is minimal - if it's even present at all. This was even the case in my 3.x days. :)

Ideally, I'd like to see only feat-based multiclassing (like, spend a feat to get a class feature with restrictions), or pre-packaged multiclasses built in a single class progression (like a fighter-wizard "bladesinger", a rogue-fighter scoundrel, and so on).

-O
 

FireLance

Legend
I've suggested before that there might be some scope to combine the best of 3e-style multiclassing and 4e-style feat-based multiclassing. Before you can start gaining levels in another class, you need to take one or more feats which will give you some of the new class's abilities. Taking a multiclass level then becomes something like taking a prestige class - you need to meet certain prerequisites first. So, before a fighter can take a wizard level, maybe he needs to take the Arcane Dabbler feat. Before a wizard can take a fighter level, maybe he needs to become proficient in at least one martial weapon.
 

Magil

First Post
I'm surprised there's as many votes for 4E feat-based multiclassing as there are, as generally the reception to it I see on the forums is rather cold. Still, I think it's my favorite brand of multiclassing, cutting out the gamey potential for abuse of 3rd edition multiclassing/gestalt without the ease of falling into a trap that is the 4th edition hybrid system. I'm too unfamiliar with the "classic" options to comment on them. I feel like it's a decent compromise to keeping character ideas focused, while still allowing a reasonable amount of customization.

I don't think such a system would work well in DnD Next's current iteration, however, due to feats coming every 3rd level instead of every 2nd. Incidentally, I'd like that to change, but I see it as unlikely.
 

Tony Vargas

Legend
I'm surprised there's as many votes for 4E feat-based multiclassing as there are, as generally the reception to it I see on the forums is rather cold.
It's got the core of a sound enough system - swapping out powers - but it seriously overvalued power-swapping.

I don't think such a system would work well in DnD Next's current iteration, however, due to feats coming every 3rd level instead of every 2nd.
And also because there are no equivalent powers to swap. 4e feat-based multi-classing couldn't even work for all Essentials classes, for instance, it was predicated on that common character progression structure.
 

slobo777

First Post
I've suggested before that there might be some scope to combine the best of 3e-style multiclassing and 4e-style feat-based multiclassing. Before you can start gaining levels in another class, you need to take one or more feats which will give you some of the new class's abilities. Taking a multiclass level then becomes something like taking a prestige class - you need to meet certain prerequisites first. So, before a fighter can take a wizard level, maybe he needs to take the Arcane Dabbler feat. Before a wizard can take a fighter level, maybe he needs to become proficient in at least one martial weapon.

I like that. Pre-requisite multi-classing at least prevents the weird immediacy of new abilities that come with 3E level dipping.

The D&D Next multi-class systems looks like each class will get deconstructed into a special multi-class version. Which is pretty similar, really, to prestige classes. Add some simple pre-requisites (even just old-school must have 13 Int to multi-class Wizard), and in practical terms, taking a D&D Next multi-class option would be much the same as taking a 3E prestige class.

Add a bonus feat back for Humans, so it can be spent obtaining pre-requisites early, and they become best race for multi-classing.
 

Wepwawet

Explorer
4E style multiclassing feats.

It's far from perfect and too weak, but i like the dipping modularity that it gives PCs.
3.5 multiclassing would be ideal, but that has too many problems. I think that 4E multiclassing feats are a very similar system, but much more limited and controlled. And you have the choice of how much and when you dip.
(But the limit of one multiclass would have to go)
 


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