D&D General Obscure one hit wonder monsters

Yora

Legend
The thread about monsters that used to be in the default main lineup of earlier editions but don't appear at all in 5th edition had me think about monsters that are really obscure and never really made any further appearance after their introduction. Some while back I had raised the question if Monster Manual 2s and higher numbers actually see much use (apparently not), but there's actually been a lot of monsters that appeared in books that weren't even actual monster books.

My question now is, which monsters from any sources and any editions, that had no meaningful appearances after their original introduction, do you really like, have used, or still plan to use one day. It's not super important if all of them really appeared only once, or if they all appeared outside of full monster books. The matter of interest here is about obscurity. Creatures that you think are really cool, but which regrettably nobody else seems to have cared for.

Big one for me is the mohrg. Which is actually from the 3rd edition Monster Manual, possibly the most well known source for monsters after the 5th edition one these days. But as far as I am aware, that's about its whole career as a monster. It's a skeleton whose insides have turned into long slimy tentacles that extend from its arms and out its mouth. They are created sponraneously from the corpses of evil criminals and people the kill rise as zombies, but only several days later, which can make it really hard to pin down what exactly is causing a new sudden zombie outbreak.

I also quite like the maur from the 3rd edition Underdark. Basically it's a fomorian again, an evil degenerated giant in the Underdark. But these ones are descended from stone giants and live in tunnels too small for them to stand in, so they have adapted to crawling while crouched. They also can meld into stone to hide themselves. And as a special ability, in caves that are high enough, they can raise themselves to their full height and gain the ability to cast lightning spell. The description doesn't say why, but crawling subterranean stone giants with strange magic power are really cool.

And I can't forget moon rats. Don't even recall the book they are from, but they are rats whose intelligence depends on the phases of the moon. During the full moon they become as smart as very intelligent humans, which is when they come together to discuss their plans and plots to gain power and control. And then over the following weeks they lose their intelligence again, becoming just like ordinary rats, until the cycle repeats next months. Since they only have a few nights each month for their grand plans, their plots take a long time to get anywhere, and being otberwise just like rats makes them perfectly hidden from anyone investigating.
 

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The Ragewalker from 3.0/3.5's Monster Manual III. A large Fey that stalks War-Torn battlefields and pretty much has the ability to not only no sell missile weapons via its cloud of floating weapons that satellite around it or cause everything to go in a berserk frenzy, but also has the ability to Dominate/Command/Rebuke/Travel with packs of Living Spells. Also uses Spiked Chains to wreck your face in with as well. Really hoping Nixlord adds it to the Monster Manual Expanded Volume 4.
 
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Echohawk

Shirokinukatsukami fan
Big one for me is the mohrg. Which is actually from the 3rd edition Monster Manual, possibly the most well known source for monsters after the 5th edition one these days. But as far as I am aware, that's about its whole career as a monster. It's a skeleton whose insides have turned into long slimy tentacles that extend from its arms and out its mouth. They are created sponraneously from the corpses of evil criminals and people the kill rise as zombies, but only several days later, which can make it really hard to pin down what exactly is causing a new sudden zombie outbreak.
I also liked the mohrg. Admittedly, it didn't have a great career, but it did get developed into a class in Libris Mortis: The Book of Undead as well as getting a few templated versions in an Elite Opponents web article.
 


Echohawk

Shirokinukatsukami fan
And I can't forget moon rats. Don't even recall the book they are from,
Moonrats were in the 3rd Edition Monster Manual II, and didn't really feature much beyond that. There is a sword named after them (Moonrat's Bane) in Dragon #333, but other than the name, it doesn't seem to have much of a connection.
 




Voadam

Legend
I used the Dark Creature template from Tome of Magic on an advanced roper to make it more of an ambush predator in a high level 3.5 game. I remember it being a fairly straightforward template to apply quickly compared to a lot of mechanically fiddly ones with a lot of number recalculation that were fairly typical in 3.5.
 


Voadam

Legend
I used the Palrethe demon and the Teratomorph from the 3.0 Monster Manual II.

The Palrethe have a neat backstory of being Balors who failed in bids to advance in power and became broken shells of their former selves at a much lower CR and with some powers linked to their broken forms.

The Teratomorph is an extraplanar giant Chaos ooze that has a randomly transforming touch attack. Very flavorful for a sparkly Yog Sothoth type planar chaos encounter.
 


Alzrius

The EN World kitten
I still think the garmorm, which from what I can tell only ever appeared in AD&D 2nd Edition's Planescape Monstrous Compendium Appendix III, was a cool monster. It was basically a human-sized worm that ate people and added their consciousness to its psychic collective, with mouths all over its body, around which faces could be seen pressing out from within its skin.

What stuck with me most about the garmorm was that it perpetually sang out of its many mouths, even when in combat. The book had the following example (and the [snap] entries are it snapping its teeth):

We are many [snap]
We are one
Now we live [snap]
Never done.


Sing of days [snap]
Sing of night
Long to sing [snap]
Show our might.


Join us in eternal song [snap]
Live with us forever strong [snap]
Our choir seeks more of your kind [snap]
Our power grows with each new mind [snap]
 




aco175

Legend
4e Dragon Magazine Annual and Dragon 364 (the first one for 4e) had the Flameharrow, "A rare form of undead often mistaken for a lich or skeleton, the flameharrow (sometimes referred to as an “eye of fear and flame”)"
One of our old DMs used to throw these at us all the time, fearsome monster in the old edition.

I was going to say the deepspawn. I found it handy to use to populate dungeons, but lazy to use at the same time.

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I also have a bunch of pictures from DMsGuild that they allow you to use, but find a whole lot of them are something I never seen or would use.
 

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